Chineese crap

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Just took the van to pick up some stuff. Noticed the brakes sounded like they had a stone in them.
I just replaced them last year, rotor and pads. You can't find anyone to resurface rotors anymore.
As a matter of fact NAPA told me the town prohibited them from turning drums and rotors. They wanted them to build a separate out building for it.
Anyway in one year the Chinese shitty rotors are gone. I used OEM Toyota pads, I checked the calipers are fine they are not hanging up... So the answer is the crappy rotors just ate away so fast. $26 per rotor.. Pads were higher than the pair of rotors.
I have to redo it after a year. I guess I am buying OEM rotors since this stuff sucks.
Buyer beware.. same with HF.. I've been burned a few times recently. putting me back on a more cautious buy with them.
--
Jeff

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On Sat, 07 Dec 2013 14:50:42 -0500, woodchucker wrote:

My mechanic tells me that the rotors are made so thin nowadays (supposedly to save weight) that it's not safe to turn them down.
--
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On 12/7/2013 8:13 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Many rotors are a composite material vs. solid steel. You turn them you ruin them.
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wrote:

Many??????? Extremely few production brake rotors are anything other than cast iron or cast steel.. Most of the damage done to rotors is due to chemical reaction with metallic compounds in the prake pads, compounded by road salt. All rotors have a "service limit" and a "machining limit". Used to be they were significantly different and you could cut a rotor up to 3 times. With the advent of CAFE, and the resulting weight reduction "imposed" on manufacturers, brakes are often now undersized for the application, and so low in mass that they cannot handle extreme heat - and machining them reduces the mass to the point the quickly warp after being machined. With today's labour cpsts, and the cost of 3C parts, it is cheaper to replace than to machine MOST brake rotors. Good brake pads today are VERY expensive compared to rotors - It is false economy to buy the cheapest rotor you can buy unless you are also putting on the cheapest pad you can buy and are not planning on keeping the vehicle roadworthy for any length of time.
My modus operendi is to never buy either the cheapest or most expensive part unless there are only 2 or less options.
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On 12/8/2013 12:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, many. Many is not a specific number or ratio to all as a whole. Plenty more than pre 90's
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On 12/8/2013 2:52 PM, Leon wrote:

Actually to be more specific and to clarify that the composites have been commonly used even in the 80's,
COMPOSITE BRAKE ROTOR APPLICATIONS Some of the earliest applications for composite rotors were the 1982 Lincoln Continental, 1984 Ford Mustang SVO, 1987 Ford Thunderbird Turbo Coupe, and 1988 Ford Taurus and General Motors front-wheel drive "W" body cars (Buick Regal, Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme and Pontiac Grand Prix). Since then, the number of vehicle applications has continued to grow.
http://www.aa1car.com/library/rotors1c.htm
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wrote:

OK, there is more than one definition of "composite" The "composite" you are refirring to is still an all-steel rotor - - Those "composite" iron/steel rotors could still be machined, successfully. Just took proper adapters for the brake lathe. I machined hundreds of them
When "composite" rotors were mentioned I was thinking Carbon Fiber and ceramic composite rotors which have worked their way into the ultra-high-performance brake world over the last number of years -not as standard equipment on any mass produced sub-$80,000 car. These rotors can NOT be machined on any normal brake lathe.
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wrote:

What normal production non-specialty vehicle uses composite rotors. Name 3 - 2 of which must be generally available for under $60,000 US
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On Sun, 8 Dec 2013 17:49:01 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

My last front pads alone pretty well hit that mark here in Canada - for 2003 Ford Taurus. Front rotors run $20 for the cheap crap to $45-ish for the decent stuff. I had ESB rotors and "green" Kevlar pads on the Mystique - $300 for the front pads and rotors IIRC - but they lasted over 5 years.
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On Sun, 8 Dec 2013 22:39:49 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

That was parts only - at my "trade" price, as a licenced mechanic. Yes, we pay a LOT more for many things up here north of the border. But that was for "specialty" performance parts. I could have put 3C parts on for about $65, and continued to change them every year for 5 years - paying the same amount or more. They actually lasted 8 years but were in bad need of replacement by the last year. (I had not served them the last 3 years - always figuring on scrapping the car.) The brakes were new on the car when I bought it - and were totally shot within 2 years and less than 10,000 miles of driving.
The pads I just put on the Taurus were $135, my cost, in the box. The real good ones were almost $200, and the cheap ones something like $60. The BPI Raybestos Element pads sell for about $70 online in the USA
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"Mike Marlow" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------- I'm not a mechanic, don't play one on TV, but $300 sounds like a lot of money for just a front end brake job.
Had my front end done on my Toyota Tacoma at about 95,000 and was told to come back about 140,000 for the rears.
Don't remember how much the fronts cost but it was nowhere near $300.
If it had been I'd still remember it.
Lew
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On 09/12/2013 1:46 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yeah, it's pricy up here. Just did the front brakes on my 2003 Silverado 1500. $108 for each rotor and $89 for the pads, plus 13% sales tax on all of it. Don't know why there should be such a great price differential between here and the U.S. There's not that much difference in the dollar.
Gil
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On 12/9/13, 9:28 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I used to own an '85 F150. Before I sold it (which I still regret), I replaced the entire brake system, except 80% of the lines for under $250. All the calipers/cylinders, master cylinder, drums/rotors, a bunch of line, pads, shoes, etc.
And I did all the work in the driveway, with a single jack and a few sockets.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Mon, 9 Dec 2013 13:24:37 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

When I first moved to Alabama, from Vermont, I had to have all of the brake radiator lines replaced ($3000). They had never seen anything like that before.
Last summer I had to replace the truck because the rear leaf spring mounts had turned to air. I'd probably been driving for the better part of a year with the springs resting on the frame. Moved much of my house and all of my tools that way.

;-)
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On 12/9/2013 6:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

What is a "brake radiator line".
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wrote:

^ and

Does the above help? The "radiator" lines included the transmission cooler lines.
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On 12/10/2013 12:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

That helps.
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Brakes ain't cheap here in Ohio. Replaced brakes on our Ford van and rotors alone were $95 each. Front brake job, including labor was way past $300.
I just replaced the rear brakes on my '99 Cherokee. Drums, shoes, brake fluid and one replacement cable and cylander ran under $180 and that was with a mechanic's business discount.
We got rid of the van (full-size). In some ways we really miss it but in others (gas, parts, etc) we really don't. Had to replace ingnitiion wires every 12-18mos and had to use Ford OEM. All after market wires would start to fail after 6 mos at best. Our last tuneup on it ran $700, including labor. My last Jeep tuneup ran me $87.
I'll give up a full-size van over a jeep anyday based on yearly cost of maintenance and gas use. Van was 13-14 MPG and 20-21 MPG on Jeep and that's using 4-wheel drive. Downside is less space, comfort and overall usabliity. We loved the van for camping and long trips but not local travel.
If you can do the work yourself, you can save some serious money, especially if you can get parts at cost. If not, you better find a really good mechanic. One that does honest prices and good work. And the latter seems to be a dying breed.
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Actually, they are cast iron, not steel. That said, quality control and metallurgy are not Chinese strong points.
Add to that, that the makers of rotors for the Detroit iron used to age each rotor, for up to a year before they put the factory turning on it and shipped it out. That is the primary reason they used to hardly ever warp, and if they did, not so badly. Do you think the Chinese age their cast iron for a year? Nope.
--
Jim in NC


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<...snipped...>

Speaking from 34 years professional experience in fleet vehicle maintenance I would seriously doubt that assertion.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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