Chain saw gas

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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 21:27:53 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

OK - when I get the saw out I pull it through once or twice with the choke on, and the ignition off so it won't tear my arm off - then turn on the ignition and give it a couple good sharp pulls - Usually running on the second pull with the ignition on.. Usually barks at me on the first "powered on" pull. - knock the choke in one notch and pull again. It either starts or tears the rope out of my hand. I don;t know if the saw is stock or not - I've only owned it for about 25 years.
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On 12/27/2015 11:32 AM, Michael wrote:

additive to increase octane to help prevent engine knock.
Vehicles have knock sensors that listen for knock and will retard the ignition timing to help prevent engine knock with cheaper grades of fuel. Premium fuel typically helps to prevent knock and the ignition timing will electronically advance for better power and gas mileage.
In the old days when you set the ignition timing manually the engines would truly run hotter if you advanced the timing too much.
Relatively modern engines these days monitor all of the engine functions and make adjustments accordingly.
If you chain saw has an electronic ignition and a knock sensor the timing could be advancing with premium fuel and running hotter. Or you could simply be getting a more complete burn with the better fuel and naturally running a bit hotter.
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wrote:

control and knock sensing??????? Some of the high-tech 2 stroke direct injection snowmobile engines are getting pretty fancy in the control department -
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On 12/27/2015 9:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No no no no No no.... Not that familiar with the modern chain saws. If none have what I described above, it would not be a stretch for it to be imagine it happening some day.

could trickle down.
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wrote:

I don't envision a computer controlled injected 2 stroke chain saw in the near future - the extra weight and the durability concerns make it somewhat unlikely in my lifetime for any but the largest professional saws. The day of the gasoline consumer saw is likely coming close to an end with new electric saw technology advancing very quickly.

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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 21:33:02 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

trunk with a 10 inch electric on a pole. Line powered - not battery - in less ths 3 hours. The tree was higher than my 2 story house. I used the electric pole saw because there was no way I was taking the remington up into the tree. I limbed it from a 12 foot stepladder with the pole saw completely extended.
After I had it down to the 4 or 5 foot stump I pulled out the remington, the noticed there was a tree service truck just finishing up down the street so I asked them how much to finish the stump and chew up all the branches so I didn't need to haul it to the dump. Less than an hour later there was nothing left but some leaves and twigs. (and the stump chunks I had other plans for)
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2015 08:00:03 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

old Partner will do except gas me out and burn my finger if I get my hand too close to the muffler. The remington has a bit more "cajones" than the big partner.
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wrote in message

The higher end Stihl and Husqvarna professional saws have engine management systems available that electronically control the ignition timing and fuel metering... Both claim to compensate for different fuels, altitude, humidity, temperature and clogged air filters.
Stihl's is called M-Tronic and Husqvarna's is called Autotune.
That said, the average homeowner or farmer probably isn't going to buy one of those professional saws... they are costly and excessively powerful for what mere mortals need in a chainsaw. The guys making a living in the woods or doing serious tree work are more likely to spend the big bucks...
John
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Don't forget the tool junkies. "This thing has electric start, SparkAdvance(TM) (tm)* that automatically fires the spark before cylinder reaches TDC, TriggerValves (tm) that restrict fuel flow when you're not running full speed, and OxoInject (tm) for mixing fresh air with the fuel for better burn!"
* (For marketing reasons "SparkAdvance(TM)" is the trademarked term.)
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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wrote in message

Found some videos:
Stihl's video...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJIBdSURoAQ

Husqvarna video...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPaofF186Wg

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"Michael" wrote in message

The manual with my saw recommends a minimum of 89 octane... I use ethanol free premium gas along with synthetic 2 cycle oil (STIHL HP Ultra) that has fuel stabilizers. In the past year or so one of the chain convenience stores started carrying ethanol free premium gas and they are adding store locations steadily over time--I've got one 7/10ths of a mile from my house now. I started using this mix in all my Stihl 2 stroke equipment (string trimmer, hedge clipper, chainsaw), and the gas in my mower, and everything runs better.
I would expect your saw to run cooler, and better, with the premium fuel as compared to say 87 octane based on my saw's manual:
"Use mid-grade unleaded gasoline with a minimum octane rating of 89 and no more than 10% ethanol content." "Fuel with a lower octane rating may increase engine temperatures. This, in turn, increases the risk of piston seizure and damage to the engine."
John
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2015 23:50:42 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

equipment. For the small amount of fuel I put through them in a year, the difference in cost is a non-issue, particularly considering the possible costs of the alternatives. A screwed up carb or a scuffed piston or siezed engine is too costly to consider trying to save the 7 cents a liter or whatever.
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I do the same. I have a 4 cycle mini-rototiller with a Honda mini engine. It has been a problem from new, had it serviced and not much better. It was hard to start and would stall after running a few minutes, and then only run a minute or so after starting hot. This was with regular 87 gas. I also have a Honda weed wacker with a mini 4 stroke engine that runs fine with regular 87 fuel.
Switched all my small engines to Shell premium, they run great and even the difficult mini-rototiller Honda now runs properly with only a change of fuel to premium.
The added cost of premium is insignificant compared to frequent servicing required when they don't run properly. By the way, I have a Honda self-propelled walk behind mower that is now over 25 years old and has never needed service other than oil changes. It starts on the first pull.
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they run just enough too lean on Hooch that they hardly run at all..
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 13:20:24 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

wallet.
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 21:42:07 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

small engine shop wanted over 4 bucks for a foot. It's about 2 bucks at Aircraft Spruce
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2015 09:32:27 -0800 (PST)

how was it helpful to run hotter
was it because of low ambient temps you could try aviation fuel at 100 octane
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Aside from the fact that that wouldn't be legal or smart in many jurisdictions (that's 100LL, and I'll allow you to research what the "LL" stands for, and the restrictions on the use of 100LL nationwide, or the efforts to phase it out).
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On Mon, 04 Jan 2016 19:05:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

remove the lead deposits every hundred hours or so. There is more lead in 100LL than there ever was in the highest octane automotive fuel sold retail (like Sunoco 260) by a factor of more than 2.
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