Can I use a Jetfence as a router fence?

I'm building an extension table on my Jet table saw to house a router for sake of space. I've seen some of the Rockler router table extensions, and they use slots to guide and hold the fence. I have a 30" Jetfence, with cast iron wings. If I buy the Rockler extension, I'd have to take out the right cast iron wing, which I don't want to do. This is why I'm making my own "smaller" version that will fill up the empty space.
My questions are:
1. Is there any advantage in somehow using the table saw fence as a router fence? 2. If so, how can I go about doing it? I can't figure out any way to attach another fence to it, without drilling holes in it. I've never used a router table, but it seems like a clamped on fence would get in the way, so that seems out of the question.
I've searched all over this newsgroup and can't find the answer to this. I'm not an expert, so what I am asking may be stupid.
Thanks in advance, Michael
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Michael:
have a look at my JET Contractors saw:
http://www.robswoodworking.com/images/table_saw.jpg
I built the table extension in no time, but I had holes in the stamped wings to bolt it to. You may have to get inventive. If you look close you'll see two pieces of t-track inlayed into the table (they're blue). These are for the t-bolts that lock the Rockler fence in place. I cut the "t" portion out of one end of each piece so I can drop the fence in or remove it quickly.
The "box" looking thing below the table is one of two simple drawers I made to hold bits/wrenches etc.
I have used the TS fance a couple of times, but rarely. I'd suggest a second fence for the router table. I used it today as a matter of fact, and I'm still glad I did it this way.
Good luck Rob
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Damn thats a clean shop!
;)

for
and
the
my
router
that
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was....a clean shop :(
Now it's someone else's....
Rob
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Rob, ...very cool website by the way.. nice work!

router
extensions,
out
to
a
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why thank you!
Rob
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I just wanted to say thanks to everyone for all these great suggestions! I haven't decided what to do yet, but this is definitely a BIG help and will get me started!
Michael

for
and
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my
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that
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On Sat, 7 Feb 2004 23:42:12 -0600, "Michael Ryan"

it's already there. it's probably stouter than a typical router table fence. it has an accurate and repeatable adjustment mechanism.

if your fence has parallel vertical sides make a fence that straddles the rip fence.
what the heck, drill some holes. it's a tool... it's there to help you get some work done, not to look pretty sitting there.

it will be in the way for ripping operations. this is the nature of having the router and the saw share the station- one will always be in the way of the other.....
it will also restrict you to a fence that runs front to back, if you want to use it while standing where you'd stand to use the saw. front to back is less useful (imo) on a router table than a fence that runs side to side, generally behind the bit. if you work at the router table from the end of the extension wing the fence will be in the right orientation, but adjusting the fence may mean walking back and forth. since you are doing this to save space you may not be able to work from the end of the wing.

if it was stupid you'd see it asked a _lot_. ; ^ )

hope it helps...     Bridger
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I own a JET 10" contractors saw and have attached a "sacrificial" fence to the JET fence with bolts (requires driling holes. Only problem I found was that as I tightened the bolts, the sacrificial fence would lean over (causing out of square condition).
You can avoid this through the use of double sided tape, or shim the fence to maintain squareness. Double sided tape can be a pain when you go to remove the sacrificial fence. If the tape has been on for a long time it can be a real pain to remove...
One thing you have to be aware of, the JET fence unless "firmly" tightened down will deflect over .020". Which when pushing items against the fence can cause "wavey" cuts. This can be avoided by ensuring that you have fully bottomed out the cam assembly, or by putting a clamp on the outfeed end.
Bridger wrote:

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