Built-up Mouldings

Popping over from alt.home.repair...
Anyone out there have any suggestions on installing crown moulding that is 'built-up' from various pieces of moulding?
Better to 'build-up' the moulding before installing? or vice versa?
Additionally, (for my specific application - above kitchen wall cabinets) I'll need to use blocking. Better to install the blocking to the cabinets before installation or after (with or without the crown moulding)?
FWIW - The crown moulding will abut both the cabinet and ceiling. Prolly a 'gap' of ~2". IMO not enough room to affix the blocking once cabinets are installed. My line of thought leads me to believe that the blocking will have to be individual pieces equaling the width of the cabinet... Suggestions cheerfully accepted.
TIA
Rick
--
Computer recommends - Hard drinking calypso poet

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I should know that, but I don't. I was in my late 20's when my mother re-married and my stepfather was a contractor that studied architecture in Vienna, worked on some high end mansions. etc. When he was older and could not do any more work, a few people would pay to have a driver pick him up, bring them to their house and watch over a finish carpenter to get the moldings the way they should be.
He offered to teach me everything he knew. Did I care? Nah, I was too busy with job and family. Damn, was I stupid to pass that up! Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I've done this I've built up the mouldings as I installed them.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
pray4surf wrote:

Build up as you go. This way you'll minimize the joints/they will be off set from one piece to the next. You can also screw the sub-pieces (where they will be covered later) to the wall, get them real snug and then use them for grounds (backing) for your final piece(s) which can then be finish nailed (in the creases of the molding by the way).

You could go either way with this. I would hold a continuous strip of blocking down from the ceiling 1/4"(ish) in case your ceiling runs out (slopes). Shims can be used to set the piece snug and use a nail or two here and there yo hold it in place. Anyways, it's always good to survey the room first, find the low spots and use them as your elevation (height) datum. Nothing worse than finding this out at the end of a run of cabinets.
Don't Ask Me How I Know This.
By the way, for wide (8" to 24") room crown we typically build an L with the ends of each leg at an angle (angel in wreskspeak) to match the back of the crown. These are then cut to 12"(ish) long pieces and located as required around the room. This way you can shift one or two to miss bumps and bows in the walls.

A full length strip attached to the ceiling above the cabinet (with a gap below) and set out the distance required for the crown (in this case it's prolly a bed mold) would work, unless I'm missing the point? I would make these in as long a pieces as possible otherwise you are up there aligning wood that was once aligned in the first place. You can also attach through the cabinet tops with finish nails. (see above for shimming info)
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I installed a 7-layer crown in my foyer. It was not an easy task as part of the foyer is 14-foot high. I layered parts in the shop, so that I had 4 layers to install in the foyer. Each layer I went the opposite direction (counter-clockwise, the clockwise). I primed and painted before installing, then painted again after the install. I would install the blocking before (and separately) the crown.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.