Brad nailer - 18 ga. big enough?

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I was thinking the same thing about Sybil here.
PDFTFT
Uh, Leon. Josepi is a troll. PDFTFT.
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wrote in message

Yeah, I am starting to realize this, I certainly hope he never has any thing of value to say as I am going to miss it.
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I guess you don't take Doug's orders very well either. tisk..tisk.. Your latest posts have been so valuable. Now remember you didn't see this.
LOL
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Lowes has a kit that includes all but the pinner. Decent quality, but not for day-in-day-out type work. They do jam occasionally, but it's not every other nail like some of the other cheap ones.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

FWIW, bought the PowerShot manual stapler (Model 5700M) which is also capable of using 9/16 and 5/18 finish nails. I've run over a box (1250 3/8" staples) through it, and it has not jammed once. That is good because it appears there are 2 or 3 screws that need to be removed "in the rare event" that it does jam. The string in quotes is from the instructions. The stapler is $19.99 at Lowes but I saw it on sale Menards recently for about $14.99. It did what I needed it to do (put up some insulation).
Bill
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I bought an Arrow CT50 LiIon stapler to do some insulation work. What a total waste of money! It won't even stick a 1/2" staple into SYP. The safety makes it totally useless. That was a Franklin down the tubes.
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wrote:

So, get 1/4" staples. SYP is 'southern yellow pine', I trust? In toughness, it comes in at 470 in-lbf, a little higher than red oak at 440 in-lbf. Half inch staples in that wood isn't an easy test.
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So, get 1/4" staples. SYP is 'southern yellow pine', I trust? In toughness, it comes in at 470 in-lbf, a little higher than red oak at 440 in-lbf. Half inch staples in that wood isn't an easy test.
And I would add that the above hardness rating is when it is relatively new. Once it has been installed for a couple years, it gets twice as hard. (unscientific difficultly to drive a nail into old SYP)
I agree, get the 1/4" staples. There is no stapler made that will drive a 1/2" staple in that stuff.
Oh, and to the O.P. : You can send that stapler to me, if you don't like it! ;-)
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It's what the Borg and Lowes here sell for dimensional lumber.

My old spring stapler does just fine, as does the HF pneumatic stapler. This thing is *WIMPY*.

Send me the $100, otherwise I'll put it in someone's garage sale and hope for $5. ;-) ...or the garbage, if I have to look at it too many more times.
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wrote:

Bet it is as good as the corded one I have. It will staple cardboard to cardboard. That's about it.
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On 8/9/2010 11:09 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Like your gun rack. May have to steal the idea.
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Yep, that's a keeper.
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Hey, _that_ is no systainer.
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Thankee..Handy thing that. Maple ply, taped edges.
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2 things: The combination stapler/nailers generally leave a larger "dimple" when used with brads than with the brad-only nailers. Not a big deal if they are only used in non-visible areas but more of a PITA if you are going to fill & finish over the brads.
Staples would be far superior to brads for attaching plywood backs to bookcases or cabinets (assuming again that the backs will be out of sight against a wall) It doesn't take much force for slight-head brads to pull right through plywood. If you are gluing the backs on it won't matter.
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Pistol_Pete wrote:

Yeah, it's big enough. Once you start using it, you'll wonder how you did without it. You can use it for installing baseboard trim and quarter-round. The brads seem to have microscopic serrations to prevent them from coming out - they are harder to remove than a plain nail.
Think about the head on a staple it is MUCH larger than the head on a finishing nail or brad. You'd use it where you need a gigantic head for cardboard, veneers, thin plywood, paper, cloth, etc.
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I need some advice about a pneumatic brad nailer. I've never had one, and they look like they would be a real help when the guys on TV use them. Question #1: Is an eighteen gauge nailer what I want? I will be building a bookcase/desk out of plywood (to be painted) and I'll be using the nailer to attach trim around the top, and to put on the backs of the bookcases ( plywood). Not sure just yet if I will use it for the shelves, but I'm pretty sure I won't they will probably be adjustable.
I really know nothing about brad sizes. If I don't buy any air nailer, I will probably use 1 brads to attach the backs (with glue of course) but a pneumatic nailer would make the job a whole lot easier. I think or 5/8 brads of any diameter would be good for the trim but I question if 18 ga. x 1 would be big enough. The piece will be built-in, and screwed to the wall through the plywood back, which is the reason for using the plywood instead of .
Question #2: Some nailers also drive staples. What are staples good for? Upholstery? Insulation?
It goes like this: Once you get one, you will find out that one does not go all things. Depending on what other things you do, you will probably end up with several. Each will do a specific duty, and do it to perfection, but the other will either be overpowered or wimpy. It is difficult to advise you what you need, because there are so many variables. You'll find out. The good thing is that they are not very expensive at pawn shops and yard sales, and even if you want to splurge at retail, they do such a good quality of work that you will wonder how you ever got along without one. You may have one that is only good for one very very specific task. That's the difference between a hacker and a craftsman. Using just the right tool.
Steve
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On Sun, 8 Aug 2010 14:44:30 -0700 (PDT), Pistol_Pete

For tiny trim pieces, use a 23ga pin nailer. For everything else, the 18ga is fine. I'm not a fan of the thicker 15ga nailers because they split trim and for heavy duty fastening, I like either headed nails or screws (my preference.)
http://tinyurl.com/25sbsgx pinner $18 http://tinyurl.com/29bok9f stapler/nailer $20 (I've owned one for 8 troublefree years now and had a plain brad nailer for 5 before that.)

I use a 1/2" crown stapler for upholstery, and occasionally the 1/4" crown for screening and metal fabric fastening.
http://tinyurl.com/26g79e4 1/2" crown $20 (5 troublefree years now)
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#1 I used an 18ga for several years before I bought a 15ga for heavier work. The 18 is a good, all around nailer for day to day shop work and holding things together until glue dries. Granted, 22ga is better for trim work but the 18ga can handle slightly heavier jobs too. If you are going to hang a lot of trim I would recommend a 15ga nailer.
#2 Staples are a nice add-on but I would opt for a good 18# nailer and then go for a cheapo stapler. In addition to my Porter Cable 18ga and Bostich 15ga I sprung for a 18ga nailer/stapler a few years ago at Harbor Freight. Not the same quality as the other two but it gets the job done, proven durable; and it cost $20 at one of their entry display sales.
RonB
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I just picked up their 23ga pin nailer for $18, with a coupon, yesterday. I also have an HF wide crown stapler that really works well. The only thing that concerned me is the lack of a safety. I had to keep that in mind when I was crawling around in the attic stapling insulation.
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