Blade Guard on a Table Saw?

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I haven't used a blade guard for years, but was reading a book today on table saws that insisted to use them whenever possible.
Question: Do you use one? If not, why not?
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No, gets in the way.

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Is this a trick question? I don't use it for the same reasons you don't use it.
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Tim wrote:

The reason the book says otherwise is because putting it in print, with your name on it, is a good way to get sued into destitution.
--
BigEgg
Hack to size. Hammer to fit. Weld to join. Grind to shape. Paint to cover.
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The reason the book says otherwise is because it's the right thing to do.
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Locutus wrote:

Well, *obviously*. Except when it's not the right thing to do
The simple fact is that it's up to the operator whether he uses a guard or not - his choice, his risk, and his responsibility.
Unfortunately, some people make the choice, take the risk, then try to make someone else responsible - hence any media (whether Norm with his "safety guards are removed for photographic purposes only" (even whilst cutting dadoes) and "there is no more important safety rule than to wear these: safety glasses" (when they plainly aren't, since they have no side guards), or the OP's book which insists on using guards "whenever possible") will always cover itself to remove the risk of being held responsible.
--
BigEgg
Hack to size. Hammer to fit. Weld to join. Grind to shape. Paint to cover.
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The first time that you put your finger or hand into the spinning blade, it will make a lifelong believer of you to use that blade guard.
I was a young and stupid teenager when I did it, and the only thing that saved me, and only left me with a scar, was that I had just as stupidly put the blade on backward.
Remember this, it is not a question of IF, it is a question of WHEN!!!
Zap
bigegg wrote:

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The sure way not to get cut is not to stick your hand in the blade.

For you, maybe.
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Quite true -- and keeping the guard in place makes it less likely that you will do that.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Mine is in place. Far end of the shop, top shelf.

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Give it time. You'll learn why that is not necessarily the right place. There is a time and place where we all of think we are 10 feet tall ,teflon coated and bullet proof. Good luck with that one.
Mike

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You think I should move it to the next shelf down?

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Well My Friend, There are some who can, and will, learn by what others have experienced, but there are always some who insist on learning the hard way, insisting that they just have to do it their way.
Every one of us who got cut up on a saw, or banged up on a motorcycle was sure that it would not happen to us, we were just too good and careful.
Have fun in the Emergency Room of the hospital, and when you come out, please write and tell us about your blade guard and if it is still on your shelf gathering dust.
I myself have no problem with you leaving your blade guard off, It's not my fingers that will be gone, it will be like my son who lost his finger just that way. Thought he could work faster without the blade guard, but now is slower just because he is trying to make the other fingers (which were damaged) still work. Well you have had enough warnings, now go ahead and have your accident. It's your privilage to do so.
Zap
CW wrote:

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Hardly a fair comparison because there's a lot not in your control (e.g. other drivers) when you're on a bike.

I have the utmost respect for the tablesaw anytime I have it running. Take a lot of care to keep fingers and such away from spinning blade and never rush. It's an imposing tool so it's hard to forget the respect part.
Use push sticks and such.
Sure, there's always a chance an accident could happen, but it's more likely to be something other than "accidentally" sticking my hand in the blade.
My couple cents...
Renata

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zap wrote:

You are making the erroneous assumption that an accident is inevitable. Well, yes it is, if you think those monkeys are going to reproduce Shakespeare in your lifetime :-).
I've ridden motorcycles since I was 14 (I'm 69 now) and apart from a few cases of road rash, had no problems. I've driven at least a half million miles and been involved in 3 non-injury accidents, none of them my fault. And I've been pushing wood through a tablesaw for at least 30 years and still have all my fingers. In fact, I can only remember one kickback in those 30 years.
Yes, I know you're going to say I'm just lucky. I happen to believe you make your own luck. If being careful and knowing the odds is luck, then yes I'm lucky :-).
Luck is when somebody shoots at you and misses :-). And yes, I've had that happen as well.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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On Tue, 24 Oct 2006 08:27:57 -0700, Larry Blanchard

Her husband was a bad shot? ;) . . . . (just kidding)
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When I rode motorcycles, we used to say there were two kinds of riders, those that crashed and those that were going to crash. Use saftey equipment whenever possible. Jack
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I do, whenever possible. The reason is simple: the blade is inside the guard. If you keep your fingers outside the guard, they can't come in contact with the blade.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 10:10:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I took mine off 25 years ago and left it off util a year and a half ago. Then I caught my the first finger of my left (non-dominant) hand in the blade. It was 95% off, just hanging by the skin and one small artery. After two hours in the operating room and six months of physiotherapy, it is now slightly functional. It goes up and down but it doesn't bend as the blade went through the PIP joint. My physiotherapist learned the word 'kerf'.
The blade guard has stayed on (except for dados) every since.
The pain in the finger is minor but ever-present. Cold weather bothers it a lot as the circulation is buggered up. Getting older is going to be a bitch as it will become seriously arthritic.
If you insist on keeping the blade guard off, move to a country with socialised medical system.
Nigel
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