Band Saw questions

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I couldn't agree more. A good bandsaw opens up possibilities we might otherwise miss. It appeals most to my frugal side, as under-nourished as that half is. The ultra thin kerf and ability to turn one board into 2 or 3 are its main attractions. Timbers I had been hoarding because they were too special and too precious to waste with the cavernous cuts of other tools found their way out of the shop when I rediscovered the bandsaw. But that's also the side that rebels when thoughts turn to upgrading. Herr Helshoj still writes me (personally, I'm sure) from time to time, following up from when I wrote him for literature and DVDs. Don't get me wrong. I'm extremely envious of your Laguna, and probably wouldn't even remember the cost to complain a week after it shows up. But until then, the quiet little voice that says, "No! Do you have ANY IDEA how many board feet you can buy with that?" wins out. C'est la vie. ;) The old Delta works fine enough. For now.
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I hear you. If mine was not helping me make money I would probably still be using the old one.
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Leon wrote:

I do a fair amount of that with my MiniMax. I have a Weber kettle and probably 98% of my barbecuing is done with hardwood scraps and cutoffs from woodworking projects (the rest with charcoal) that I've cut into manageable pieces on the bandsaw. I pretty much have more barbecue fuel than I know what to do with! But I'm workin' on it, and I don't call myself "bbqboyee" for nothing! :-)
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I use scraps to start the fire but beyond that it tends to burn too hot and too quickly. I prefer fire wood in the raw once the fire is going.
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The current Delta collection of 14" bandsaws:
http://www.deltaportercable.com/Products/CategoryOverview.aspx?catPathB74.4313.4325
Note the motor sizes, which have changed very little in the last 40 years. A resaw band saw and a garden variety band saw are worlds apart.
MikeWhy wrote:

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Rilly. A deuce and a half differs from my pickup truck how?
And can't I resaw with a garden variety, non-resaw bandsaw?

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On Wed, 8 Jul 2009 14:24:15 -0500, "MikeWhy"

Perhaps "serious" has the wrong connotation. "Heavy" might be closer to what I intended. There was no intent to imply that small, thin, light, etc. was frivolous or lacking in skill or craftsmanship. If you inferred that, be assured that was not my intention.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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I have a 1 horse on my Delta wood and a 1 horse on my horizontal metal band saws.
It depends on what you cut. My delta is a 14" tall version for bowl cutting. I do nominal re-saw on it - but mostly nominal wood work.
Martin
SBH wrote:

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Thank you all for the replies. It helps me make a better decision when purchasing. One more question which many have indicated about "resawing". What exactly is "resawing"?
Thanks
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peices. Often done to create venners. This is how a bandsaw can save you some money. Buy some expensive wood, resaw it and glue it to cheaper wood to make various projects.
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Standing a board on edge and splitting it in half. At the saw mill they cut the boards and maybe plane them to a thickness. Then you can "resaw" them into thinner boards.
They also use the term to indicate the type of finish because it is sort of rough, so some wood comes with a resawn finish. Many times you will see exterior trim boards available in the construction lumber area with one smooth face and one resawn face. You can decide if you want smooth trim or resawn (rough) when you apply it to the house.

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Wood from a mill may come rough sawn, (unplaned) S2S (surfaced 2 sides) , S4S (surfaced 4 sides) meaning it has been planed after sawing. The pieces for this "what-not" shelf were *resawn* from a piece of 1 X 4 (actually 3/4 X 3 1/2 finished size) http://picasaweb.google.com/contrarian32/WhatNot#5353296161094057298
Max

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Standing a board on edge and splitting it in half. At the saw mill they cut the boards and maybe plane them to a thickness. Then you can "resaw" them into thinner boards.
Slight correction here, resawing is not necessarily splitting in half, I typically resaw and get 5-6 pieces out of a 3/4" thick board.
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Yeah, but.... You've got one of those $320,000 Laguna bandsaws and a 1/2 micron thick 3" wide titanium/diamond equipped bandsaw blade to do your resawing.
What is everybody else supposed to do? You could of course invite is all over to your place to use your bandsaw and when a few of us accidentally cut a few fingers off, we promise not so sue if we can have all your woodworking tools.
:)
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wrote in message

That is a 1/2 micron thick 3" wide titanium/diamond "Special Edition" bandsaw blade, smarty pants! ROTFL
LOL,,,, But surely with a marginal, well my first BS could resaw into 3 or 4 pieces, a 2 bu 4. ;~)
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SBH wrote:

About 15 years ago, I bought a used 14" Rockwell/Delta bandsaw. It had (and still has) a 1/3hp motor. Since acquiring the saw, I've managed to resaw 6" wormy chestnut and other hardwoods (slowly). Feeding too fast caused the saw to stall. Never had an issue with cutting hardwood "on the flat" as long as the blade was sharp.
Current versions of this saw can be purchased with a maximum of 1hp motor. I believe that Norm Abram uses this model and relies on it to do resawing when needed.
~Mark.
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But that was 15 years ago and it was used then. They don't build'em like they usta. HP rating are now exagerated. As a side note, I just retired and sold my 30 year old Rockwell DP that had a 1/3 hp motor, it never stalled regardless of what size forstner bit it was spinning.
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Leon wrote:

I'm glad you said that because my 55 year old Rockwell/Delta 14" bandsaw has a small motor, I think its 1/2 hp but could be 3/4. It has never felt underpowered to me. I never installed a riser block so it only cuts 6" deep, and I've resawn white oak and hard maple to near that depth. I can't even imagine a 4 1/2 HP motor on a bandsaw? Wow! The other thing is I hate 1/2" blades on the thing, not because of power issues though, but because of turning radius issues. My favorite blade was aways a 3/16th inch skip tooth. I bought one when I was cutting names out of 2x4 lumber and needed speed and small turning radius. Turned out I liked that blade for everything, including resawing.
Anyway, my BS has never disappointed me and I wouldn't trade it for anything less than one of those "$320,000 Laguna bandsaws with a 1/2 micron thick 3" wide titanium/diamond equipped bandsaw blades" that some of you have.
I'd have to replace the blade though:-)
--
Jack
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wrote:

But, a Horsepower 55 years ago is a lot more powerful than today's horsepower. What's so crucially important is how well the bandsaw is tuned. Even an underpowered one will resaw with ease, it will just take a little longer.
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