any feedback on the HF tools?

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hello,
wondering if any of you had bought these planes and have comments?
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber520
cyrille
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Life is too short to buy and use cheap tools! Why not look into a quality plane that will give you a lifetime of satisfaction? Dave
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Teamcasa wrote:

Life is also too short to wait until you can afford a "quality" plane, especially if you need one now. It's also too short to wait until you can afford every supposed "quality" tool when a "cheap" tool will work just fine currently. If I spent all my money on the tools I'm "supposed" to get, I'd probably be still waiting to finish that birdhouse from 7th grade. If you can afford the high end tools, that's fine and dandy, but if you're on a tool budget, there's absolutely nothing wrong with the dreaded Harbor Freight. Blasphemy I know, but my great-grandfather managed to build a three-story house without the Hitachi Power Sneakers.
Might have to tinker with the planes from HF, but it's been my experience using planes, from the antique planes passed down from my great-grandfather to high end planes that you have to tinker with them anyway.
Woodworkers from the 1800s are laughing at us.
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ivytheplant wrote:

I tend to agree. Buying the best almost always makes sense if you're going to use something frequently. You will make up the cost in the longevity of the tool, and it will almost certainly do the job a little (or, in some cases, a lot) better.
However, for the weekend warrior who only needs a certain tool once in a blue moon, having a cheap version is a lot better than having none at all. And since a lot of us can't afford to spend top dollar on a tool we will only use a few times a year, buying cheap makes a certain amount of sense. (I'd rather have a beat-up old clunker to drive across town than to walk 10 miles every day while I was saving up for a BMW.)
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Charlie M. 1958 wrote:

Exactly. And there's no rule that says you can't still save up for the BMW while driving the clunker.
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ivytheplant wrote:

And still drive the clunker on crappy days...
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What? And let everyone know I have a clunker (still).
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Wed, Oct 25, 2006, 10:25am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (ivytheplant) doth sayeth: Life is also too short to wait until you can afford a "quality" plane, especially if you need one now. It's also too short to wait until you can afford every supposed "quality" tool <snip> Woodworkers from the 1800s are laughing at us.
You've got that right. I was spending my "quality tool" money raising two sons on my own. Possibly the only reason Ive got a shop today, albeipt small - 8'X12', and most of the tools I've got, is because I got a unexpected bouns when my job at the time shut down. If not for that I'd have been a lot longer in getting any shop at all. The shop might be small, and i might have a batch of HF and other inexpensive tools in it, but they all work, and I try to be properly grateful for what I do have. I bet woodworkers from at least the mid-1900s are laughing too, that or they're all saying "WTF is wrong with those people?".
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in (ivytheplant)

My wife & I raised 4 sons, and we're pretty pleased with how they turned out. For most of the time while they were at home, I borrowed tools from Dad, or friends, and 'made do', or bought a very few good tools.
When they finally moved out, and completed college, the money was there for some good tools, and I bought a bunch of them. Now I take them to the boys' places, and work on their projects, or take them up, and work on my dad's house.
JOAT's plan of buying what you can afford, when you can afford it, and painting it yellow, makes an awful lot of sense to me. It's just really hard to do with a Lie Nielsen plane, ;-)
There's nothing wrong with buying a Harbor Fright tool, if that's what you need, or want, or all you can afford. There is very little value in having more tooling than you can use.
Enjoy all of this. Doesn't last forever.
Patriarch
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Well, I go along with a lot of HF stuff, but the plane I got is just a starting point. I don't think I could make it work properly with any amount of work short of remachining. Used real plane every time! WL
(ivytheplant)

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Wed, Oct 25, 2006, 6:13pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcast.net (Patriarch) doth sayeth: <snip> JOAT's plan of buying what you can afford, when you can afford it, and painting it yellow, makes an awful lot of sense to me. It's just really hard to do with a Lie Nielsen plane, ;-) <snip>
Gotta say, a Lie Nielsen plane would pretty much be wasted on me. However, with the boys grown I'm now in a position where I can buy some higher quality tools. Most of them will still get painted yellow, definitely including anything the boys are apt to use, or "borrow".
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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ivytheplant wrote:

What, like $5 ?
You can get a perfectly serviceable old Stanley #4 or #5 for that sort of money and an evening's work. Even my "best" #4 (a perfect rosewood Sweetheart and one of the best performing planes I own) only cost me 40ish, which is what I spent on dinner last weekend.
There is _NO_ excuse for ever buying an Anant or similar abomination.
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Andy, These planes look to be 4-5 inches long with a half inch cutter. They appear to be brass with a rosewood infill. On the website they looked kind of cute. Regards, Hank
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Henry St.Pierre wrote:

I own one. They're crap.
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And unless you get it into a landfill or recycling, the damn thing will still be around 200 years from now for someone to display! :o)
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Then how the hell was a couple HF planes and a dollar store plane able to make a houseworth's of extensive cabinetry and shelving? If they're so terrible, then they shouldn't be usable at all. Unless there's a rip in the space-time continuum.
I still maintain that woodworkers from days of yore are rofling at us. In fact, I'd bet my table saw on that :P
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"ivytheplant"
I frankly could care less that you buy their Chinese, slave labor, costing US jobs, cheap junk. As for the old time furniture builders, they used the best tools and technologies available to them at the time. If they had access to a Unisaws, 20" bandsaws, vacuum bagging, hi-tech adhesives, shapers and 3hp variable speed routers, carbide cutting tools, A2 and stainless steel, diamonds, compressed air and the tools they operate, polyurethane and many other advances, they would and do use them now.
I too have tools from the 1800's, passed to me by my father, grand and great grand father. They are the tools they used, they were the best ones they could afford or build themselves, and subsiquently, still good today. I doubt, serioulsy doubt any tool sold by HF will still be around in 200 years, much less working.
Dave
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There are a number of reasons why I buy tools. Subsidising an e-bay gloat 200 years from now is not one of them.
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"ivytheplant"

"Teamcasa"
"Lobby Dosser"

You missed the point. Again. HF tools are cheap and designed to be short lived. If the OP, or anyone else wants to buy and struggle through using them, only to toss them after limited use, it OK with me. There will always be people that tout the cheap route thinking they outsmarted everyone else by getting such a good deal. They are happy in this knowledge - until they actually use a high quality tool.
Dave
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I OWN some HF tools. I buy HF tools carefully. One of the very big advantages to HF tools is that they ARE inexpensive. If I drop my 4" angle grinder from the roof to concrete, I'm out $9.00. If I drop the DeWalt, I'm out a Bunch more. I don't need an angle grinder that will last 200 years. I need one that is inexpensive and will do the job.
If I'm doing pro work I'll buy the best saw that I can afford that will do what I need it to do. I'll Still buy the HF angle grinder.

I OWN some high quality tools. None of the power tools will last 200 years - Period. Most of the hand planes that I own belonged to someone else 50 or a 100 years ago. Two of them date back to the 1750s. I tune them to work for me. I've even 'modified' some by sawing and grinding off bits that get in the way of what *I* want it to do. If I had paid $400.00 for that plane I would be Very reluctant to do that. As it is, the most expensive planes I own are the 250 year old planes - I paid $25.00 each for them and bought them just because liked the idea of owning them. I could use them, but I just like them sitting there and neither does anything I want done right now. If the need arises, I Will use them.
If you really want to buy tools that will last 200 years, that's fine. Everybody has his own excuse for buying another tool, but don't knock it if you haven't tried it.

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