Abuse Your Old Glue

OK It works. But I still won't trust it for major projects. All ten of the girl's glue ups had to be broken with a hammer. She even got into the smashing fun. The wood broke but the glue did not. So abuse your glue.
--
Master Chef Richard Campbell
100% Delightfully Evil for Your Protection
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Master Chef Richard Campbell wrote:

So, you have a 100% success rate and won't trust it?
What kind of logic is this? :(
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"Master Chef Richard Campbell" wrote:

SFWIW, last time I bought a gallon of TiteBond II, it was about $20.00 USD.
How much wood or better yet, hardware, for this project, can you buy for $20.00?
There are better ways to reduce project costs than trying to reclaim 2 year old glue, IMHO.
Lew
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Lew,
I asked him to "abuse" the glue and do a test just to see if he got the same results I did. He did.
Don't think he intends to use the old glue.
But it is interesting that after shocking the glue back to life, the joints held. Question is, will they hold in the long term or has there been a chemical reaction now that shortens it's life span?
No matter - this was just a curious exercise..... And if I ever had to use old glue (winter storm, can't get to the store, famine in the area and everybody croaked, the little guy's from Mars landed...) and I had to absolutely glue up some Piney boards so they would fit in the fireplace..... I'd use it in a flash.
Bob S.
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Bob S. wrote: ...

...
I realized later I misinterpreted the reference to which the don't trust it phrase referred as thinking the test was on the new and a general distrust of Titebond was being expressed instead...
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"Bob S." wrote:

Good question.
When you add up the cost of all the materials, throw in say $5/hr for your time, you quickly realize that the adhesive cost for a project is a relatively small percentage of total project cost.
It just doen't make sense to try to use old glue except as you describe below.

Lew
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Here's something else that is strange about TB.
I had bought a couple of gallons for some big laminated beams I had to make up, and had about a half gallon left over after the beams were put together.
So in the time honored tradition of many years, I filled myself up a bottle of it for the truck and tossed it in the box. I forgot about it, and it made it migrated to the middle of the truck box and stayed under some stuff for about a year.
We were out in the middle of nowhere, and needed some glue, but found we didn't have any with us. Then I remembered that stuff. I pulled it out and it was thick and lumpy. No good, right?
One of the guys had the number on his empty bottle, so I called and talked to the tech guy myself.
"Hard lumps or soft lumps?" he asked.
"Soft, but the size of dimes and they won't come out of the spout".
"Can you get it out of the bottle? If you can, pour it all out into something, add a TINY bit of water, then stir the lumps out. That should get it."
Damned it if didn't work. And that glue stayed the correct consistency for another 8-9 months until I used it all.
That tech guy told me you could also use it after it had been exposed to freezing weather for long periods of time, just not frozen completely solid.
I don't know, it may be some kind of voodoo employed in making that stuff. I don't use anything else for general purpose adhesion.
Robert
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On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 22:31:28 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Exactly what they told me. That's why it is good to go to the primary source to get info when the such source exists.
Also told me (for III) that you can add up to ten percent water to increase open time in extremely high heat without any detrimental performance issues.
Frank
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote

I'd heard the adding a bit of water trick before, but not for increasing the open time. Did he give any indication of how much open time you may gain by doing so?
The "open time" issue is something that somehow seems to turn critical in just about every project I've done lately ... every minute gained can be as precious as the wood itself in a one man shop glue-up.
I've been using the "extend" version, and even going to weldwood on the complicated, but any extra time gained, and that could be quantified, would be "nice to know".
Thanks ...
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If he did I don't remember a specific. Conversation took place last summer during a string of triple digit days when I was having a time trying to do some complicated glue ups. Cooled off after that and I never tried it.

On complicated glue ups, I've started doing a dry clamp, then taking a digital picture, and marking the sequence. Must be old age <G> I did this on a cradle that had no 90 degree angles in the construction so many clamps and angle make up blocks to get it done.

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"Frank Boettcher" wrote

What ... no SWMBO in the mix?! :)
Mine knows nothing about woodworking, but out of necessity (mine) she's learned to be a clamp operating champ!
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Actually, she did help on that one and, remarkably, we did not get into a fight. :)

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"Swingman" wrote:

Time to take a look at epoxy.
Standard laminating resin and slow hardener will give you at least 30 minute pot life in 75+F weather.
Having a helper to handle the clamps allows you to not to have to be so careful working with the epoxy, but working alone is still no deal breaker.
Lew
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Yeah. Jobsite folklore doesn't always cut it whe the rubber meets the road. And surprisingly, many companies still have one or two guys that can answer real questions hanging around.

???
When I have added water, it >>seemed<< that I CUT my open time as it was thinner. did he give you any thumb rule guidelines? With our 100+ degree days we have here (like right now) we can use all the help we can get.
Robert
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On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 09:04:58 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

None that I can remember, and I didn't try it so can't verify.
Frank
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