12 volt wood saw ideas ?

Page 1 of 2  

Looking to convert my large trailer into a mobile pallet recycling (into fuel) operation for next autumn (GB). Want the saw to run off car battery so any ideas/experience for
1) converting battery saw e.g. deWalt 2) putting a 12 volt motor onto bandsaw 3) something i have not thought about
Chainsaw is not an option
Regards David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
david wrote: > Looking to convert my large trailer into a mobile pallet recycling > (into fuel) operation for next autumn (GB). Want the saw to run off car > battery so any ideas/experience for > > 1) converting battery saw e.g. deWalt > 2) putting a 12 volt motor onto bandsaw > 3) something i have not thought about > > Chainsaw is not an option
I like option 2.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How about using an inverter to change the voltage? you could run some of you corded tools off of it and use it to recharge batteries for the battery operated one. No jury rigging tool that way.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
--------- Looking to convert my large trailer into a mobile pallet recycling (into fuel) operation for next autumn (GB). Want the saw to run off car battery so any ideas/experience for ---------
Hi David,
Please, do yourself a favor, use a deep cycle battery to operate your saw, NOT your car battery! You will kill your car battery in no time by discharging it often by more than 20%. A car battery is designed for a very large current supply for the short duration of an engine start, which actually uses only 5% of the battery energy capacity in regular conditions. The battery gets recharged back immediately when the engin is running. It is not designed to be discharged!
A deep cycle battery has a different plate construction and is meant to supply a smaller current and be discharged by 80% for 200 to 300 cycles. By using a battery isolator, you could rechage (partly, maybe) the battery while driving back home.
Car starting batteries have the bad habit of dying suddenly and leaving you stranded in the wrong place. Please do some research on deep cycle batteries and the best ways to prolong their life.
Good luck!
Andre
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
david wrote:

What about putting a gas motor on your bandsaw/tablesaw? I've seen it done.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In recycling you aim to use less energy than you're going to recover.
Chris Friesen wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, he plans to use the car battery for power right now. Where do you think the energy to charge that comes from?
todd

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm sure he can charge it more efficiently than by using a small gasoline powered engine.
todd wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Please post the efficiencies of a dedicated generator and a car/alternator setup.
todd

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First you would have to compare apples to apples. Most any automobile engine runs more efficiently than your typical portable dedicated generator engine. Any you could probably run 15 alternators on an automobile engine if that was all that was expected out of the engine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fine. I'm just asking for the numbers. You seem to know it's the case, so pulling some numbers with a source should be no problem.
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

numbers are that important to you, do a Google search and or request this information from the manufacturers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

However if you are going to make an assertion that on the face of it seems unlikely (a 200 horsepower engine running at near idle to provide the couple of horsepower necessary to run a bandsaw is _not_ going to be more efficient than 2 horsepower engine running full throttle unless that 2 horse has something badly wrong with it) and then not support it then the rest of us will decide that you are a loon.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
david wrote:

Fuel for what?
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would not recommend trying to run a decent size saw or bandsaw on 12V.
Think of the large cables you will need. Consider a 1 HP motor. Small for a table saw, not considered small for a bandsaw.
1 HP = 745 Watts (Volts x Amps). Accounting for motor efficiency, you could be looking at needing to run cables which can take 70 Amps. If you undersize the cables, you starve the motor and will cause something to fail or burn.
I recommend you buy a small portable generator. I do not know about the UK, but in the US there are many sizes and brands available. The less expensive will not last as long and have more noise.
At least this way you can use whatever motor is on the saw/bandsaw and may also use the generator for lighting.
If all you are doing is cutting up pallets, I would go for a bandsaw as requiring less power for a given cut thickness, due to far fewer teeth cutting compared to table saw.
I have a 1 1/2 HP table saw and it really slows down when cutting 8/4 maple. I used to have a 3/4 HP bandsaw which was able to cut the maple without a problem (assuming the blade was not dull). I now have a 2 HP bandsaw and as expected it can cut 8/4 maple even better than the smaller unit.
Another consideration is the cost of blades. If you are cutting pallets, you may miss a nail or staple. If a blade was to be ruined by accidentally cutting metal, I think a bandsaw blade will be a cheaper replacement than a decent table saw blade - at least it is for me.
My table saw blade cost me $90. My bandsaw blades cost me around $20.
Dave Paine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
*snip*

Are there bandsaw blades that can handle both wood and metal? I know bandsaws are used for both purposes, but are the blades/speed the same?
That's another thing to consider.
Puckdropper
--
www.uncreativelabs.net

Old computers are getting to be a lost art. Here at Uncreative Labs, we
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Metal saws turn slower and use finer tooth blades. You can cut (slowly) wood on a metal saw easier than cutting metal on a wood saw. There are a couple of dual speeds but I don't know if they are acceptable for both.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
david wrote:

Add a deep discharge battery to your car or van and get a 1000W inverter. Run your circular saw off that. My tuppence worth .....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Generator. I doubt a 12V saw is going to give the power and endurance you need.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
david wrote:

Handsaw, crowbar and small sledge hammer? Or buy an 18v cordless sawzall and a mess of batteries that you can recycle in the evenings.
I know that not an innovative solution, but the hand tools are not much slower for demolition/recycling tasks. Good exercise too, and they fit the whole "recycling" ethic well too boot.
H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.