SWMBO management?

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simpler and quicker to use. Our cloth (i.e. re-usable) bag Miele needs no regular maintenance at all except that of emptying its bag when it's full. In its 20 year plus life I think I've cleaned its insides out and replaced the filters maybe four or five times. That's much less work than our Dysons have required.
--
Chris Green

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On 29 Jan 2004 10:18:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

car. You need to be committed to using a Dyson, they're not for everyone and they're not indestructable. A bit of TLC and fine fettling is sometimes required to get either to work properly at times.
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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You mean based on a 20 year old design?
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*Why is "abbreviated" such a long word?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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50, more like.
MGBs are Morris Minors in drag.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
[email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
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No - the MGB owed its heritage to the '47 Austin A40 Devon - the first car to use the B Series engine and running gear.

More Austin Cambridge. The Midget was closer to a Morris Minor - but even closer to an Austin A35.
--
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

I find it sad you have such detailed knowledge of these cars which were all British rubbish. I know as I have driven most of them..
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You say.

Perhaps you'd care to say what contemporary vehicles you'd compared them to?
--
*If your feet smell and your nose runs, you're built upside down.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

At te start of their life, teh Midgets and MGB were excellent cars. By the end of thier life the later VW and far east stuff, and even Opel/vauxhall were doing far better than BL.
The cavalier became the de facto cortina relacement, and more or less held the top rep spot until the mondeo finally won out - no one really liked sierras. Sure a passat was a better motor - but look at the price in those days!
Likewise a toyota corrola or datsun lasted longer, but weren;t available in volume n teh 70's and early 80's .
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Well, I was talking about Morris Minors and Austin A35s as they were what Huge mentioned, and they were BMC products of the '50s, not BL from the '70s.
Of course BL got outclassed by foreign makes - as did Ford and Vauxhall, and the Hillman group just disappeared without trace.
To blame this *all* on the British workforce, as many do, is plain rubbish. It was mainly down to the City, as in so much else, simply wanting a quick buck.
--
*I wished the buck stopped here, as I could use a few.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

It ws a combination of poor management, poor union intelligence, and poor design and complacency.
No one ever made anything out of BMC/BL. Maybe one or two directors, but thats it.

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You *are* joking. BMC throughout much of the '50s and some of the '60s consistently paid large dividends - of around 20% - instead of investing in decent R&D. Then when their sales dried up - virtually overnight - due to not having modern competitive models, the City withdrew its money and caused - eventually - the formation of BL.
A poor workforce is invariably caused by poor management - who ever heard of a happy one causing trouble? And it wasn't about pay, but more autocratic management who treated their staff like chattels. This came from the top.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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wrote:

I had several Cortinas - a Mk 3 at the beginning of my driving career, and several Mk 4's when I joined the company car set.
Never got a Sierra, I went for the Cavalier CD (and later SRi) instead, still on the company car fleet.
I remember I got a mailing from Rover in the late 80's which claimed that if I took a test drive in a Mondeo then I would get a free CD of my choice. I thought "what the heck, for 10's worth of CD I'll drive a Sinclair C5 round the car park if I have to".
I drove the Mondeo Countryman, which was a big car. As this coincided with the start of my family I got one - and found it quite a pleasure to drive for the 2 years I had it. British Leyland junk it may have been, but I was quite pleased with it (however, being a company car I didn't actually have to pay for it).
Changed it for a Mondeo, then left HP. Got a Rover 214, too small for my right foot, but I had it 3 years before I got the Freelander.
I have to say that Rovers quality has improved substantially since the British Leyland days - I've been inside several of their plants.
PoP
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PoP wrote:

LOL. No wonder Rover went down the pan; giving you free gifts to test drive a *Ford* ;-)
ITYM Montego.

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Damn. Who's been switching these kyetpos around? ;)
PoP
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PoP wrote:

The worst one of all

MUCH better. Almost driveable ;-)

The mondeo is a ford...you either mean a marina, or the other one whose name escapes me Montego? Not bad, but not that good..

Awful car that 214.
Feelamder - almost gor waway from teh old BL parts bin. Not a bad car, but I decided it was roo small for a utlity, and too expensive for a shopping trolley.

Not the old defender that I have - 3 years old, alwytas leaked, been in for more warrantiesd than I have had chmpagne breakfasts. Still uses switches and door handles straight out of a 1970's marina..
The Discos and freelanders are much better. BUT the disco is to dear and teh feelander is too small...

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On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 17:13:07 +0000, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

They're supposed to do that. It isn't a Defender/110/90/109/89 unless a) Water gets in everywhere; b) So does the force 8 gale outside; c) You need ear defenders to drive it.
I love 'em. But not for the comfort factor :-O

Aahh - Lucas, Prince of Darkness.

Freelanders are too close to the ground for their supposed class. Disco's not bad - pity no one ever drives them off road.
101 FC's are fun though. Try getting your wheel clamp on one of them, Mr B**tard Traffic Warden!
If I had infinite money, I'd go the whole hog and get a Rangey. Comfort and guts.
Tim
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BillR wrote:

Actually bits of them were not too bad. The Midget engine wasn't bad. The MBG engine wasn't too bad. Ceraily no worse than any other makes including germn - of teh period. If you want a really bad engine, try the old air coolled VW Bettele engine. You might have to regrind a morris crank after 70k miles, but you had to line bore the VW block as well...
The gearboxes and backl axles were also not bad.
What let them down mainly was poor fittings and rusty bodywork. And an extaordinary front shock absorber arrangement.
Contrast with the triumph Hearld/sopitfire front suspension, whch was univeraslly used my most kit cars as beinginfintley better. Sadly the rear suspension on those was as bad as - yes - the VW beetle!
What actually happened is that Briotain failed to keep pace with European stanrads in engine longevity, top speed and cossroision prrtofing, and far east standards in reliabiliy and gadget provision.
Thats why Rover used a Honda engine ultimately in their smaller range. The old rover engines were direct descendent of the A35 (A series) and the original morris oxford (B series) engines. Never been changed.
If BMC had bitten the bullet, and simply concentrated on one or two GOOD designs, and sacked the workforce and opened up one new factory, they might have made it.

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Both the A and B Series are Austin designs - the A Series first in the A30 and the B Series first in the A40 Devon - both from the '40s, when Austin and Morris were still separate companies. Only after BMC was formed in IIRC '52 did Morris start using Austin parts.
The current K Series Rover engine which has been around for about 15 years has *nothing* to do with Honda - it was an in-house design, and a pretty good one too - although now perhaps outclassed.

They'd have needed decent management first. Stokes was an accountant with no vision beyond a fast buck and stuffing the workforce. Typical of the management of the era.
If you really want to find out about him and his tricks, read up about the history of Albion - his first major takeover, which had an extremely hardworking and loyal workforce. Didn't stop him just near closing it down, though.
--
*Even a blind pig stumbles across an acorn now and again *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

Mmm. However the old A30 engine wasa a sidevalve. Not sure what the A40 devon used.
The A series as used in midgets/minis etc was born somehat later - it was certainly used in the later morris minors, but I am not sure whether the A35 had the side or OHV engine.

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No it wasn't, unless I'm blind, as I've done a complete engine re-con on one. It was the original incarnation of the A series in 803cc form. And the whole car was near identical to the A35. Later used to replace the sidevalve unit in the Morris Minor MM in '53. The pre-war Austin 7 was side valve, but that bore no resemblance to the A Series - which if anything was loosely based on the Bedford wartime 'high speed' truck engine, as was the B Series.

The 1200cc version of the B Series which later became 1500 in the MG Magnette - the first car to use that version.

All OHV and all the A Series. If you look at the externals of a '47 A-Series it's near enough the same as the last Mini. A production run of 50 years. Of course there were many internal modifications throughout its life.
--
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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