What work gloves do you use for heavy infestation of poison oak & ivy (covered in urushiol)?

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What work gloves do you use for repeated immersion in very heavy impenetrable thickets of poison oak & poison ivy?
I'm covered in black poison urushiol from head to toe!
So far, these are the gloves I've tried (most of which failed miserably)! - Pics here: http://yfrog.com/jc45906740jx - Album http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?idE906740.jpg
Specifically, what skin is best for repeated washings? - cowhide? goatskin? deerskin? what skin is best? And, what gloves are available that are long and durable? - garden gloves? oxy-welder's gloves? mig welders gloves? (what else?)
Cotton/leather work gloves are wholly unsatisfactory: - They wash well; but the thin leather is worn out after 1 or two uses; - They're too short to be of much use in heavy infestations; - Worse yet, the back cotton allows urushiol to penetrate to the skin!
Leather work gloves are slightly better, but still wholly unsatisfactory: - They're strong enough to take the wear of a few uses in the chapparal; - But they're too short so my wrists get covered in the black oil; - Worse yet, an XL comes out of the wash as an L which is smaller still; - Yet the leather gets hard as a rock after a few wash cycles!
Cowhide oxy-acetylene welder's gloves are also unsatisfactory: - They're nicely long so they cover the wrists perfectly; - And, it's no problem finding an XL size to fit my large hands; - And they're thick enough not to wear through on the first few uses; - And they come out of repeated wash cycles as hard as serpentine! - But they're just too cumbersome to use around power trimming tools!
I just tried the pigskin mig-welding gloves with some success: - They're nicely long, almost as long as the O2 welder's gloves; - They're all leather like the leather garden gloves so they're strong; - And the leather is thinner than gas welder's gloves (nice and nimble); - And, you can get them in XL sizes which don't seem to shrink too much; - But they too get hard as a rock after repeated wash cycles!
Next I'm going to try the goatskin mig welding gloves: - Like the pigskin mig welding gloves, they're long & seemingly durable; - And, they seem to give a bit more "feel" than the pigskin gloves do; - Also, I can get them in XL sizes (but I hope they don't shrink too much); - Mostly, I hope they don't get as rock hard after a few wash cycles.
If the goatskin mig welding gloveds don't work, I'll try the deerskin mig welding gloves; but there must be someone out there who has worked in heavy impenetrable thickets of poison oak and/or poison ivy and/or poison sumac who has solved this problem.
What other gloves can you recommend for protection when cutting through heavy thickets of poison oak, when you're covered in black urushiol marks from head to toe?
Requirements are: - Available in size XL (and needs to stay XL after repeated washing!) - Must be durable (can't have any cloth) and must cover the wrists! - But can't be so thick as to hinder the use of power tool controls. - A bonus would be if it stays pliable after repeated machine washings!
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On Apr 9, 2:30 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Go cheap and just throw them away when you are finished.
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 11:32:58 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc wrote:

Cheap would be fine if it also worked (at least once).
But, as shown in the well-annotated pictures here ( http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?idE906740.jpg) ...
Neoprene or latex or nitrile gloves are cheap, but they tear in seconds outdoors and they don't cover the wrists from urushiol (still, I wear them UNDER the leather gloves) ...
Garden gloves are less cheap (about 10 bucks a pair); but they don't work (too thin, too short, and too permiable too urushiol) ...
Welders gloveds are decidedly not cheap; and they seem to work the best (so far); but I'm wasting lots of time and money on testing them one by one (first oxy cowhide, then mig pigskin, and now mig goatskin (next would be mig deerskin))...
Surely someone other than me has worked in poison oak/ivy before me?
What do outdoor firefighters use for gloves? What do outdoor field workers use for gloves?
Certainly someone must have the experience & recommendation that I lack for outdoor gloves that are long, durable, and can be washed repeatedly???
Here are my experiments so far (deerskin mig welding gloves are next): http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?idE906740.jpg
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On Apr 9, 2:46 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

I kill it off with 24d and wait 6 months or so before trying to clear it.
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 12:16:39 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc wrote:

As explained in the pictures, the main problem with "garden gloves" is they're too short and if they're not 100% leather, they're too permeable to urishiol oils.
Any web page which doesn't discuss the black stains of urushiol is going to be suspect because anyone who hasn't seen the black all over their clothes hasn't really been exposed to poison oak or ivy!
This guy has been exposed ... I can tell by his description of the black stains on his leather gloves. Unfortunately, he says leather is permeable to urushiol (I doubt that myself, as long as the leather is thick, in my experience). He does use what he calls "neoprene gauntlet gloves" http://www.curtbeebe.com/docs/anecdotes.html
BTW, killing the poison oak does absolutely nothing to the urushiol which permeats every part of the plant, from the leaves to the stems, to the roots.
As you can see in the pictures, the stems are from a mm thick to a few inches in diameter, so, they're chock full of always poisonous black urushiol even a hundred years after they've been "killed off". http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=45906740.jpg
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That would be my preferred method. I recall, in the days when one could easily get the stuff that you don't use 24D for brush and poison ivy but the better chemical is 245T a close but stronger relative. I don't know if you can even buy the stuff now.
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EXT wrote: ...

2,4,5-T was decertified years ago by EPA even for licensed agricultural use in the US. 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T mix was known as "Agent Orange" and the indiscriminate use in 'Nam and aerial spraying for attempting to thwart marijuana plots in proximity to habitation was prime motivation for the ban.
--
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 17:06:29 -0400, EXT wrote:

Mine too! If it would work.
Unfortunately, killing the leaves does nothing to clear the thicket of the infectious stems and roots.
See these pictures to get an idea of the chaparral we're talking about: http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=45906740.jpg
Your feet are a foot off the ground due to the intertwined dead stems which then go up and over everything to a height greater than twenty feet. It's almost like a jungle (although I've never been in a real jungle so I can't say for sure.)
Also see my previous references which claim that a tiny drop the size of a pin point is infectious months, years, proven cases of a century in samples stored in archives, and some people say, essentially forever.
This is deep in a valley where you can't even walk through the stuff w/o hacking away with a machete and/or power cutters. I don't think a bobcat or bulldozer can get in there either because I have to climb down a rope cut through the poison oak just to get to the bottom where most of the work lies.
PREVIOUS REFERENCES: Only a few molecules are needed to cause a rash: http://www.curtbeebe.com/docs/Urushiol.html )
An amount the size of the tip of a needle can cause a rash: http://www.technuextreme.com/faq.htm
Some assert urushiol is infectious forever: http://www.poison-ivy.org/html/faq.htm "The oil from poison ivy is extremely stable and will stay potent - essentially forever."
Others show examnples where urushiol infectivity lasts a century: http://tinyurl.com/ybkublp "For stability urushiol has few equals-it has been found active in dried plants that date back more than 100 years."
Yet others assert urushiol is infectious only for a few years: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poison_ivy "Urushiol oil can remain active for several years, so handling dead leaves or vines can cause a reaction."
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 21:50:03 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

Roundup kills the root system, not just the leaves. There are different solutions of Roundup. The full strength stuff is about $100 a gallon. I obliterated a large stand of Bamboo that didn't grow back. Bamboo is a lot harder to get rid of than any poison ivy and poison oak. Some people claim the only way to get rid of Bamboo permanently is to remove all the earth and dispose of it elsewhere.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 18:45:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I understand. But did you look at the pictures of how thick the chaparral is? No way will roundup work. Unless I'm missing something critical. http://img338.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=poisonoakurushiolchapar.jpg
As in all threads, I can't put all the information in the first post so I stuck with the relevancy for gloves. But, I did buy the Costco roundup concentrate which costs IIRC about a hundred bucks.
I haven't been able to use the weed killer yet except on the areas I already cut because there is no way I can think of to spray the stuff if I can't even get my arm into the thicket more than a couple of feet.
I have to go hundreds of yards. The roundup can won't spray that far! :)
So, my plan for the roundup is to keep the path I've cut clear of NEW poison oak growth.
But, even if the roundup did work, I'd still need good gloves to hack it all up and carry it away, wouldn't I? Or do you suggest burning it where it lies or doing some other composting of the poison oak leaves, stems, and roots?
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Kat Rabun wrote:

http://img338.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=poisonoakurushiolchapar.jpg
No workee... :(
...

If this is anywhere near any other residential area, whatever you do, don't try to burn it. It doesn't completely destroy the stuff and inhaled it's worse internally than simply the external itch/sores...
If it's this bad I'd probably be considering ought to be working in Tyvek coveralls, etc., treating it as essentially as if it were a hazardous waste site.
W/o the pictures, etc., of terrain and so on, hard to say, but sounds almost like need to start w/ the chain saw and just slice 'n dice to get thru the big stuff.
What are you doing to dispose of it???
--
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 18:45:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

The p[roblem with roundup and poison ivy is the oil on the plant protects it from the roundup. A friend found adding a couple ounces of diesel fuel to a gallon of roundup improved the kill-rate on poison ivy by several hundred percent. It helped the roundup penetrate the oily defence.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 20:32:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I haven't had any problems like that with it.
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Elmo wrote:

Firefighters gloves are BULKY unless you buy the good ones. However as I said in my other post Extrication gloves would do the job and work well.
--
Steve W.
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 18:46:54 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

Get the good neoprene impregnated cloth hazmat gloves - they are built like a rubber boot.
Safety supply should carry them - not cheap.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 16:12:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

BTW, I don't know about neoprene, but poison oak urushiol apparently goes right through latex gloves! :(
http://www.curtbeebe.com/docs/beingsmart.html
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 14:32:18 -0700, LM

The beuty of neoprene is it is totally resistant and impervious to oils and alkalis
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 17:39:28 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.cawrote:

Might also want to cover unprotected skin with Bentoquatam topical (generic for Bentone 34; Ivy Block; IvyBlock etc..)
Urushiol can atomize in microscopic proportions enough to cause Contact Dermatitis if you're going to be squeezing and pulling on living plants.
Also don't burn any plant containing Urushiol it can persist inside dried plants making the smoke toxic.
Ask your pharmacist about IvyBlock.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 17:58:05 -0400, Which Doktor wrote:

I didn't mention it but you can see a bottle of the stuff in the pictures I posted at http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?idE906740.jpg
Apparently it's the same bentonite that drillers use.
I didn't mention it (because I was concentrating on the gloves), but I use layering when I cut tunnels in the chaparral of Western Poison Oak (Toxicodendron diversilobum or Rhus diversiloba):
1. Ivy Block on my hands and wrists (also face and neck, ankles and feet); 2. Nitrile gloves on my hands 3. Gauntlet style heavy leather work gloves (pig or deerskin mig welding gloves)
Chemicals alone won't prevent poison oak rash at the huge concentrations I'm being exposed to.
I can see the oils on my gloves and clothes before it turns black. It takes a day or so to turn black but you can see the oil it's so thick (and it takes only a few molecules, the size of a pin point, to give you a rash).
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Use nitrile or latex gloves and cover them with leather gloves. The nitrile is to protect you from the gloves and the gloves from hard work that tears plastic.
Take leather off and you can spray them down with a soap.
Then wash hands in soapy water (with gloves on) and dry off with paper towels and throw them away.
Then take off the plastic gloves and run for your life!
We have it all over here - roundup takes it out - but sometimes it is so big - 1/4" stalk - that it takes several treatments.
Martin
Elmo wrote:

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