What the heck goes into the trash can (as opposed to recycling?)

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Malcom Mal Reynolds wrote on Mon, 02 May 2016 16:31:14 -0700:

Good observation!
We don't have cats or dogs, but I wonder why cat litter isn't just compost. Certainly the refuse part of it is normal compost.
What's cat litter made out of anyway?
I suspect it would be perfect for compost.
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On Tue, 3 May 2016 02:24:42 -0000 (UTC), Arthur Cresswell wrote:

Perhaps it is considered a biohazard.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasmosis
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On 2016-05-02 10:37 PM, Mike Duffy wrote:

clay based stuff anyway, we use a wood pellet, I have seen it sold as cat letter, then saw essentially the same stuff sold for pellet stoves. It works just as well and is much cheaper.
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On Tue, 3 May 2016 03:01:34 -0000 (UTC), Arthur Cresswell wrote:

Did you read the reference?
Cats are the only host in which the parasite can reproduce.
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Mike Duffy wrote on Tue, 03 May 2016 10:00:27 -0400:

My only point was that poop is poop and poop is good fertilizer and who cares if it has toxoplasmosis when it's fertilizer?
You care if babies eat the stuff, but in my back yard, there are no babies.
Anyway, if I had cats (which I don't) and if I kept them inside (which I would think is cruel for a cat) and if they therefore needed kitty litter, I would feel happy to recycle that kitty litter by dumping it in the compost heap along with everything else.
I guess, the end results of the question is that most people are far more picky about what they put in the three locations:
1. Waste that is composted at the household 2. Waste that is put in the trash to go to a landfill 3. Waste that is recycled
I guess I'm just less picky than most of you and thankfully, since we put almost everything in the blue buckets that comes from inside the house, the trash collectors are apparently not that picky either.
Lucky us. Our prices seem on par with everyone elses for once/week pickup at roughly a dollar a day.
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Uncle Monster wrote on Mon, 02 May 2016 19:43:29 -0700:

http://www.ehow.com/facts_4909742_what-cat-litter-made.html
Cat litter is made from various materials including clay, silica, wheat, corn, cedar, pine and paper.
Seems pretty compostable to me.
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My philosophy is that anything to be discarded which fits into an opaque garbage bag goes into the trash bin.
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On 5/2/2016 5:09 PM, Arthur Cresswell wrote:

Some years ago, there was a comedy. Might have been a take off of Candid Camera. They put about eight bins out of a guy's house, and then had a comic instruct the home owner what goes into which bin. The confusion and bewilderment was really comical. I sense we have reached such a point in society as a whole.
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Stormin Mormon wrote on Mon, 02 May 2016 21:10:19 -0400:

My kid wanted me to help her win a free t-shirt at a local earth day event, where I had to take a bin of trash and play basketball, putting each item in the right bin.
Of course, I failed a few times, but eventually I won her the t shirt.
I hope she appreciates it.
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On 5/2/2016 10:23 PM, Arthur Cresswell wrote:

If she watches near zero television, and is cell phone free... then she had a chance.
You didn't ask my advice. But spend a lot of time with her. Express your love. And read to her often from good books.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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Stormin Mormon wrote on Mon, 02 May 2016 23:00:12 -0400:

She is a good kid. All kids are good if you let them be so.
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Arthur Cresswell wrote:

complicated things that don't qualify as e-waste, some food wastes that i would like to compost, but Ma will not, plastics that don't fit our recycler qualifications (like many others our recycler will not take styrofoam or food wrappers or many other wrappers).
as for many organic materials and yard wastes that others throw out or use curb recycling here i either put them through the worm bins or they get buried in a garden. bones eventually get broken down, or just bury them deep enough and the worms and soil creatures will work at them through time. in the older days you could crush or grind the bones up for use in the gardens or as chicken grit. food/veggie scraps all go to the worm bins eventually (i might dry some first because i don't want them sprouting and growing later).
we have some friends in the city who bring us their leaves, wood ashes and whatever else they want to get rid of that is an organic material. this helps us a lot in our many gardens so we give them stuff back in the form of jams or produce and they can also reuse the leaf bags several times before we also bury those in the garden. cardboard layers work well as smothering for weeds. plastic coated cardboards i recycle at the curb, i don't want plastics in the gardens.
all paper stuffs are used as weed barriers or are shredded and composted with the worms.
i've emptied my wastebasket in my room here one or twice a year and often it it mostly fuzz from frayed carpet samples that i use to slide the worm buckets around on (instead of scraping up the wood floor).
i do have e-waste to recycle from time to time and batteries from gadgets.
most the trash going out here as trash is often from projects Ma is working on with fabrics and i don't want to end up with stuff not rotting so i just let it all go. even if i know cottons or other natural fibers will rot eventually, i don't want to deal with sorting it out or trying to get her to do it. once in a while i'll put an old shirt in the ground to give added fill, but i seem to keep finding threads that do not rot so i don't like to do that much any more.
songbird
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Every time you rinse out a food container that residue is going into your septic or sewer system, which in my case with a septic system needs to be pumped out and disposed of in a sanitary manner every few years. In my case that is about $250 per honey wagon load.
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On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 7:28:48 AM UTC-4, Steve Stone wrote:

And typically you need to use hot water and even soap to get it clean. Mayonnaise is one of the worst. If it's bad enough, I'll just toss it in with the garbage instead of wasting time and energy to clean it. You have to wonder about the economics and environmental impact of having to clean those hard to clean things. I know people who clean even a can or jar until it's spotless. If you go down to the township facility where they accept stuff you bring in, they have a giant dumpster for the recyclables and OMG, what a mess. It's obvious a lot of people aren't cleaning up anything. But even when I tell people what it looks like there, they still want to run the hot water to make every bottle and can shiny.
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On 5/3/2016 8:26 AM, trader_4 wrote:

About thirty years ago,when Reader Digest sent paper based magazines, there was a comment clip sent in by someone. The family had a picnc, and she was cleaning up. Paper plates and plastic forks went right into the trash, and then she was rinsing out the various food containers for recycle. "Just look at me! I'm washing my garbage and throwing out my plaes and silverware!"
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trader_4 wrote: ...

using hot water to clean recycling containers is a waste of energy. and as water gets tougher for some areas to come by they will also usually be much better served by a larger facility doing the cleaning in bulk.
i rinse stuff out with cold water and some soap if needed to break up the fats.
in a perfect world all containers would be recycled and all manufactured products would get recycled. there's only so much metal/petrochemicals to go around and eventually they'll be gone. we'll probably be mining old dumps at some point.
songbird
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On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 8:26:52 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

I find that there's usually enough room in the dishwasher to add the occasional mayo jar or whatever recyclable needs to be cleaned.
My recyclables are stored on my enclosed porch until I schlep them out to the (detached) garage. I don't want a bunch of smelly food waste sitting around on my porch, which is also my laundry room.
Cindy Hamilton
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trader_4 wrote on Tue, 03 May 2016 05:26:47 -0700:

The wife makes mayonaise from three ingredients: 1. An egg 2. A squeeze of lemon 3. oil
She blends that in a way that takes skill (because I always end up with a mess but she ends up with mayo) and it stays in the plastic container until it is used up (usually it's about a cup of oil at a time because you can't really make less and blend it successfully).
We just rinse it out in the dishwasher, and it seems to come clean.
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Arthur Cresswell wrote on Tue, 03 May 2016 23:03:36 +0000:

Same by the way with the ketchup.
When we need ketchup (catsup?), the wife whips up a batch out of: 1. Tomato paste 2. Vinegar 3. Spices (interestingly enough, stuff that is used in pumpkin pies!)
When the catsup/ketchup is done, we put the plastic container in the dishwasher. Where the catsup goes from there, I never see it.
It is a pain to have to rinse out the tomato paste cans.
They should make tomato paste cans like they make caulking guns.
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Unless you are dumping a LOT of food down the drain (garbage disposal?), or dumping things that shouldn't go down the drain, your septic is either undersized or is not functioning correctly. Anaerobic bacteria should normally break down the waste in your septic tank, so you should only end up with a very small amount of undigestable sludge.
We are required to have our septic system inspected every three years, but I haven't had to pump my septic tank since 1999. Even then it wasn't really needed, they just pumped out of routine when the inspection program was started.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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