What's .001 uufd ?

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I'm trying to fix this antique black and white tv. There's a part in the tv that says .001 uufd on it. On the other side it looks like a domino with 6 colored dots. The dots are different colors, the thing is rectangular with a wire on each end. It is about 1 inch long a half inch wide and 1/8 inch thick. Flat package. I know it's not a chip or power transistor becaue this is a tube tv set. It dont look like a resistor. Capacitors are usually labelled MFD (microfarad). What the heck is uufd?
These antique electronics sure have some weird parts, even though they are built like army tanks. I wish I had a tube tester....... They all light up !
Another thing. I notice corrosion around one of the filter caps. I bet it's leaking. It's a metal can about 4 inches tall, 1.5 inches in diameter, and it has 3 leads on the bottom. (3 caps in one can) It reads: 80mfd 600v 10mfd 450v 40mfd 450v Where can I get a replacement?
I get nothing on the screen, but there is a loud hum coming from the speaker, which happens to be a the weirdest speaker I ever saw. It's got a coil where there would normally be a magnet and an extra set of wires going to the chassis. No parts look burned.
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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 02:51:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

uufd means micro-micro farad. Now it's called picofarad. You have a .001 picofarad capacitor. (This is a very small value, are you sure you have the decimal point right?) The colored dots were a type of color code for capacitors, similar to the color rings on resistors. They were often called domino capacitors; you can search for that term.
You are probably right about the filter cap, it is common for them to dry out and fail. It's pretty hard to find multi-section filter caps any more (at least that aren't old an dried up). You can replace with three separate caps with the minus sides (usually) tied together. Failure of this cap would likely explain the loud hum. Do a google search for multi-section capacitor to find sources and suggestions.
And you have an electromagnet speaker. Instead of a permanent magnet, it used a second coil driven with DC to create the magnetic field for the other coil to work against.
Good luck, you're going to need it! And there are still plenty of enthusiasts around with tube testers; you're going to need that too!
HTH,
Paul F.
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Paul Franklin wrote:

If he does (have the point right, that is), that would equate to 1 nF (nanofarad)...although I think standard nomenclature uses the uuF instead???
Not unheard of, but quite small, indeed.
--
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Actually that's backwards...
A microfarad (uF) is 1/1000000 (millionth) of a farad. A nanofarad (nF) is 1/1000 (thousandth) of a microfarad. A picofarad (pF, formerly known as uuF) is 1/1000 of a nanofarad or 1/1000000 (millionth) of a microfarad.
So pico is the smallest common unit, micro is the largest, nano is in the middle.
As another poster said, .001 picofarads is incredibly small, I've never seen a commercial capacitor made with such a low value. .001 uF is much more likely.
Incidentally, Google can do conversions like the above. Just enter "1 microfarad in nanofarads" and it'll give you the answer!
Eric Law

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Eric wrote:

...
Yeah, DOH! Had a moment there, for sure...writing/thinking weren't connected to each other... :(
--
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Antique B+W TV sets were power hogs. I can't picture a picofarad cap having an existence in the circuitry. Plus if the cap is physically big enough to have color dots printed on it for cap value purposes its likely a lot higher than the picofarad value.

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Metric prefixes eta- 10^18=1,000,000,000,000,000,000 peta- 10^15=1,000,000,000,000,000 tera- 10^12=1,000,000,000,000 giga - 10^9=1,000,000,000 mega 10^6=1,000,000 kilo- 10^3=1,000 10^0=1 mili- 10^-3=.001 micro- 10^-6=.000,001 nano- 10^-9=.000,000,001 pico- .10^-12=.000,000,000,001 femto- 10^-15=.000,000,000,000,001 atto- 10^-18=.000,000,000,000,000,001
1 nanofarad = 1000 picofarad = .001 microfarad .001 picofarad = 1 femtofarad.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 02:51:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com

...
try sci.electronics.repair and make sure you read the faq (do a google search for "sci.electronics.repair faq")
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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 02:51:13 -0500, fartblanket wrote:

Try asking in the right news group. There is an antique repair group for radios but I know none for televison. Maybe someone in sci.electronics.repair knows?
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uuF = MicroMicro Farads = Pico Farads. Rec.antiques.radio+phono group can help out a lot more - there are some TV restorers in there . Someone might have some things you're looking for.
You're right - there's no chips in that TV. But you best learn more of the parts in there - some might be knocking you on your ass - if you're not careful.
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001 pF or uuF sounds like an impossible number. Stray capacitance will be higher.
help http://www.vcomp.co.uk/components/cap_codes/cap_codes.htm
I would guess its really a 1000 uuF pF
greg
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Doesn't it go: Micro, Nano, Pico? so Micro = X10 to the -6 nan0 = X10 to the -9 and pico = X10 to the -12 so micro micro is X10 to the -12 or pico? and there fore .001 micro micro ,001 pico which is not a valid commercially available value

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wrote:

Sounds like you've got those units right. For some reason they don't seem to use milli- (10^-3) or nano- with capacitors.
I don't know much about old electronic stuff, but in the more recent stuff there are a lot of .001 uF (not uuF or pF) capacitors.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 15:34:58 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@pitt.edu (GregS) wrote:

Go to http://www.goodolejoe.net and download "TV Diagnostics II". It also contains color code charts. Cheers, Joe
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On 8/1/07 8:34 AM, in article f8q971$bh$ snipped-for-privacy@usenet01.srv.cis.pitt.edu, "GregS"

It's .001 mFd, or uFd if you prefer. A value commonly found in older radios.
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Look here
http://www.dc-daylight.ltd.uk/Valve-Audio-Interest/Component-Colour-Codes/Component-Colour-Codes.html
Arfa
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Radiosrfun wrote:

However 0.001 picofarads makes NO sense at all.
Graham
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I was answering the "basic" question of uuF - and that was "before" i had my coffee. I wasn't paying attention to the actual "value". Due to the back ground of the poster - it "appears" he had limited electronics experience to start with. I'm more concerned with his sticking his fingers in a place - unexperienced, than a "Value" of a component.
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Some of my first experiances with electricity.
My mother told me of the time I was spilling water in to the socket of a table lamp I had unscrewed the light bulb.
The second time was with a remote control bus I had which worked with a spark gap static transmitter. I had unscrewed the antenna and poked my finger inside while pressing the transmit button. I remembered this ocasion very well.
Watch out where you stick your fingers.
greg
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Ah yes, our formal learning years........ I used to stick my fingers in Lamp sockets and turn them on - what a tingle! OR grab onto Antennas with a transmitter turned on. No wonder I've got such an electrifying personality! I produce sparks most of the time when touching metal or so on. Hmmmmmmmmmmmm How I miss those years! I'll have to try to relive some of those experiences for old time sake.
L.
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