What is the exact tap & die size for a USA garden hose thread (it's not NH)

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From a prior thread, it appears that taps and dies do exist for standard USA garden hose thread; but one needs to know the exact size of the GHT which seems to be an openly held secret.
Can we confirm what the typical USA garden hose thread tap and die size would be?
According to research, it's NOT National Hose (NH) thread; although it's similar, it's Garden Hose Thread (GHT).
The best I can find that describes GHT is this obscure Yahoo reference: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid 070131022106AAKkLuz
If that's right, the tap and die size for GHT would be: O.D. 1.0625 at 11.5 threads per inch
But, does anyone truly know what GHT taps and die sizes are (and where we can get a real GHT tap and die set)?
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 05:07:34 +0000 (UTC), Brent wrote:

Wikipedia concurs at an outside diameter of 1.0625 inches and a pitch of 11.5 tpi ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_hose ) but rec.crafts.metalworking say it's O.D. is 1.031. and has 11.5 TPI.
Early in April of 2004, the folks at rec.crafts.metalworking had some information but not enough (http://tinyurl.com/az4p9 ). They concluded nobody makes taps and dies for garden hose thread, I believe.
"A garden hose connector has a nominal size designation of 1 inch, the actual O.D. is 1.031. and has 11.5 TPI. 1.031 is real close to the O.D. of 3/4 inch pipe (1.050) but 3/4 inch pipe is threaded at 14 TPI. 1-inch pipe has an O.D. of 1.315. and has 11.5 TPI. So it looks like straight or tapered isn't the problem, no pipe die is near the correct size."
and
"Hose coupling threads do not match any standard NPS or NPT thread. The pitch diameter (0.9875"-1.0060") is almost the same as 3/4"-NPS (0.9820"-0.9873"), but the 11.5 TPI pitch matches 1"-NPS, not 3/4"-NPS (14 TPI)."
and
"The thread spec. for garden hose fittings is ANSI/ASME B1.20.7 (see Machinery's Handbook) and the designation is NHR" 1-800-993-4353 (Field Tool Supply).
Those at misc.consumers.frugal-living found a freely available tap and die set but I can't seem to find their link anymore. http://www.craftkb.com/Uwe/Forum.aspx/metalworking/11243/Tap-Die-for-hose-threads
"If you mean garden hose, the proper designations are:
.75-11.5NH (cut, formed, or rolled) .75-11.5NHR (thin wall formed)
However, I don't see how you could make these with just a tap or die, as they involve a pilot, a relief, and a different lead-in thread angle, not just threads. Google ".75-11.5NH tap die" = 0 hits."
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On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 22:23:13 -0700, Terra Arcane wrote:

http://www.diy-forum.net/re-garden-hose-end-re-thread-die-t120356.html
"As noted, you're probably not going to find a die or tap for a garden hose thread. The problem is, the male ends aren't cut threads anyway on anything except perhaps the brass NPT/hose adapters--they're formed. The female ends are so shallow that you would need a bottom tap and probably couldn't reach but a portion of the first thread, anyway, even if you had one."
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snip---
the male ends aren't cut threads anyway

Not always. There are machined brass ends available---but rarely (if ever) found on cheap hoses. I have machined brass ends on many of my hoses (I am a retired machinist---I know the difference).
Harold
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http://www.widell.com/popular%20special%20supplement%2004-09-01.pdf
Scroll down to 3/4-11-1/2. You will see a garden hose size tap listed. Don't know about the die though.
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Good machined solid brass are available: http://www.tamparubber.com/product_pages/coupgard.htm
Go to any hydraulic hose repair shop, they often have the fittings or make up garden hose sections from high quality air hose material. They even survive getting driven over.
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 11:47:35 -0500, DanG wrote:

What most people do to clean up a garden hose is take an old garden hose with good GHT fittings and slice a sharp channel crosswise across the threads with a triangular file. This self-tapping channel should be shallow at the beginning and as deep as you can get it near the bottom.
Then they use this "thread cutter" as a thread chaser on all their garden hoses. Works both for the male and female ends of your lawn garden hose.
If you can find steel garden hose repair fittings, it works even better than the sliced brass garden hose fittings to clean up the threads.
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On Aug 12, 10:53am, Kat Rabun <katspianostudio...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

No, "most people" certainly do not bother. They will either cut the hose and install a repair end, or throw the entire hose away.
The garden hoses I see for sale, even the so-called "good" ones, have stamped brass ends. These are not re-threadable, or repairable in any way. They must be sliced off and replaced.
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Ho-ho! You must be in another newsgroup. Here on RCM, we'd machine a female die from A1 tool steel, calculate a appropriate load of Red Dot powder and primer, and re-shape the end with explosive forming. As a bonus, it would really clean out the inside of that hose.
It couldn't take more than four or five hours of work to save us from having to buy a $3 replacement end. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress



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Ed Huntress wrote: ...

Chuckle... :)
I've done things like re-round them after crushing, certainly, but not by explosive forming...
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Or hand write the G-code to CNC a pattern and then cast a new end. But first you have to build the machinery and the furnace...
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And Bullseye would be better for explosive forming than Red Dot.
"
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Brent wrote:

For Gawds sake, buy a fricken heavy duty brass replacement like you were shown. They aren't cheap but they can be driven over and not distort. And it's good for life! When the hose is shot you keep the good replacement end for when your next hose has a problem.
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On Wednesday, August 11, 2010 12:07:34 AM UTC-5, Brent wrote:

Could a tap be made for Water Hose Threads ?
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Could a 3.5 year old question still need an answer?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I think a water hose is close to a standard pipe thread, if you want to try some pipe fittings to find out.
The problem is that a hose thread is loose, so it can be turned by hand. It depends on a soft washer to seal between the end of the hose and the faucet or hose it attaches to. A tap would need to cut a flat surface at the end of the thread, for a washer to seal against.
Fred
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On 4/3/2014 9:21 AM, Fred McKenzie wrote:

...
Close, but no cigar...look at a male/male NPT/GHT adapter and you can easily see the difference. No fitty if try reversing ends...
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I have a couple that have smaller threads on the faucet itself to accommodate a backup protector thingy which has the hose thread on it. I can't get the hose to match up directly to the faucet.
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On Thu, 03 Apr 2014 11:55:03 +0000, it was written:

A 3.5-year old thread could still need tapping! :)
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