Weatherproofing wood with paint?


I need to make a lid for my Cistern. I plan on using some 2x4s and perhaps 3/4" plywood. I am wondering if I paint this, will it take on any measure of weatherproofness?
If not, how do i make wood weatherproof. Also, without handling too many nasty chemicals. I'm not interested in the treated wood, but I can use it if necessary. Can't afford cedar.
The water in the Cistern is not for drinking.
CLG
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perhaps
Nothing makes wood "waterproof" if exposed to serious rain when horizontal. Your best bet would be to design a sloping roof (for rapid runoff) and emulate either a house roof (shingled) or a ship's hatch (treated tarpaulin tight over a wood frame, exposing no wood to the weather.)
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Don Phillipson wrote:

THanks, I had not thought of that. Roof will also discourage walking, but ill have to make it presentable.
CLG
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CL "dnoyeB" Gilbert wrote:

Exterior plywood maybe. I never had any luck with non treated boards on my deck no matter what I put on them. Newer pressure treated lumber contains somewhat less toxic chemicals. Access to my septic tank is about 2 ft round concrete ring.
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CL "dnoyeB" Gilbert wrote:

Seems that exterior house paint, properly primed and applied, would do as well on a cistern cover as on a house. End grain requires particular attention, extra coats, as that is generally where paint fails on exterior wood. I would paint all parts before assembling, and put on another coat after.
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coat of fibreglass
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jim wrote:

I was thinking of cladding it in metal, e.g. flashing or similar. I assume only the top needs to be waterproof.
If you do go with fiberglass, you could use balsa or other similarly light material, as at that point it's simply part of the matrix. (I believe that some sports cars actually used a balsa/glass sandwich for floorboards.)
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I'd use some of that plastic-skinned stuff sold as cheap sheet siding, or maybe the stuff they sell for skinning trailers. Or even a sheet of corrogated roofing material, either fiberglass or metal. I'd also make the frame for the lid out of metal or PVC pipe. There is a reason few docks are made out of wood anymore. I assume this lid doesn't have to be human-safe to walk on?
-- aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

I want it to be safe to walk on. Not that its in a walking area, but because someone may stumble on it and I don't want it to collapse. The area is about 64"x96". I'm thinking of semi-permanently covering it, then having 8-12" of dirt on top then planting a flower garden. Ill still border off the area. And leave a small observer hole in the center.
My water has lots of red mud that will make its way into the tank. I will likely have to clean it once per year. Planning to use the shop vac for that.
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CL "dnoyeB" Gilbert wrote:

Paint will be fine. Use an exterior paint. A primer wouldn't hurt, but you can also put on extra coats of the regular paint.
Use a wood filler to fill any voids in the edge of the plywood before you paint.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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In time anything you use will fail, but marine grade woods will last far longer than most. Even those must be protected by a marine grade finish.
I suggest you also consider fiber glassing whatever you use.
Regular outdoor paints are not water proof, but rather water resistant. They will not stop water vapor only liquid water.
Wood is a material that usually does best when allowed to breath, so completely sealing it can actually cause problems.
Few wood products or finishes available at the local lumber yard and suitable for that kind of use.
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Round here well covers for what are often called 'surface wells', that is 12 to say 25 feet deep have often been made of galvanized sheet metal. Typically circular because most wells have a vertical pipe down to a 'rocked in' water chamber below ground big enough to allow a person to go down if required. Typically the covers made by a local 'tinsmith' are slightly conical, ours is about 30 inches in diameter and still unpainted but not rusted after some 20+ years. We don't use the well now since municipal water was provided but there's a couple of feet of water in the well, the cover etc is in good shape and the well could be used if necessary.
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On Tue, 16 Sep 2008 18:15:45 -0400, "CL \\"dnoyeB\\" Gilbert"

Corregated fiberglass (or that hard plastic wall covering) over the wood will last longer than paint. Untreated wood will invite insects and rot.
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CL "dnoyeB" Gilbert wrote:

Just out of curiosity, how large is the lid to be?
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