"We kept Wal-Mart out of our town!"

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"[PLAINFIELD, Penn] Walt Neidlinger spent years trying to keep a Wal-Mart-anchored shopping complex from being built...
"The traffic would have been suffocating for their little community, neighbors argued, so when the massive retailer and its partners packed up their plans and left ... Neidlinger was ecstatic. He figured he'd wait for the next plan to come along and remembers thinking, 'What could be worse than Wal-Mart?'
"Over the past year, Neidlinger says, he's gotten an answer: RPM Recycling -- the metal-shredding plant on the same land -- causes daily noise that sounds like a freight train rumbling down the street, and frequent explosions that shake his walls."
http://www.mcall.com/news/local/all-3rpm.6547307aug17,0,5038048.story
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Should have let WalMart in.
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'What could be worse than Wal-Mart?'

Proving yet again: Be careful. You might get what you're asking for.
It's a lead pipe cinch that Walmart would NOT have permitted a recycling plant to be built next door.
All those jobs, all that tax base - gone. (Never was.) Too bad.
<sigh> JR
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Jim Redelfs wrote:

Good point. The recycling plant has, what, fifty workers compared to 200 for Walmart. And the recycling plant generates zero sales tax dollars for the city. Moreover, the property tax has to go down in the neighborhood due to the collapse in home value by being next to a noise maker.
But Walmart's not there. To some, it's an even trade.
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Jim Redelfs wrote:

Actually, Walmarts don't contribute a lot in taxes because they strategically plan so much of their floor space to their grocery department, for which they pay no taxes.
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On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 20:58:16 -0700, Samantha Hill - remove TRASH to

I'm no fan of walmart, but that doesn't make sense.
I've been to Walmart, and plenty of their floorspace is NOT groceries. 70 or 80 percent, maybe more.
Whatever groceries people buy at walmart, if there were no walmart, they'd buy it somewhere else. The total amount of groceries sold doesn't vary that much in an area, because everyone eats.
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wrote:

That sounds right, considering the Wal-Mart Supercenter here.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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We have a Super Wal-Mart about 1 mile away. Half the building seems to be groceries. They have a whole bank of gas pumps, maybe 10 or 12 of them. The gas is the cheapest around here. I used to go there, but no more. The customers are too trashy. If i need something from Wal-Mart then i order online. I'll go there for gas, but only when it's not too busy, which is almost all the time.
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On Mon 18 Aug 2008 09:29:11p, Marina told us...

I can't afford to think "global ecomony" or even "local economy" when I need to make every single penny count. Wal-Mart generally has the best prices on almost anything I need to buy. I really can't afford to not shop there. If I find good specials at other stores, then I go to those stores, but inevitably I end up at Wal-Mart for a lot of my shopping.
I agree with you about the typical customers. I make it a point to shop at times where there is a minimum number of shoppers, either extremely early or extremely late.
--
Wayne Boatwright

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Boatwright wrote:

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I spoke to a friend who is the CEO of a bicycle manufacturer about his dealings with Wal-Mart. He said he's happy to sell to them, but only on condition that his company's name does not appear on the product, because of what he's forced to do in order to meet their pricing policies. Example: fewer spokes in the wheels, vinyl instead of leather saddles, plastic where metal should be used, unsmoothed welds, no primer, less paint, etc. You only get what you pay for. A great majority of Wal-Mart merchandise is built to a price point, rather than a quality/feature level.
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PanHandler wrote:

Yeah, and poor Sam much be spinning in his grave to the point of being dizzy.
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Google Vlasic pickles and Wal Mart.
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This concept predates Walmart by a few, thousand years.

With the exception of "great majority", I agree with this, particularly with the bicycles you cite. I believe it holds true with other, so-called "durable" goods.
--
:)
JR

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wrote:
[snip]

Including really thin plastic parts that break much too easily, making the product useless.
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On Tue 19 Aug 2008 12:53:45a, Don Klipstein told us...

We're very careful shoppers, and not unaware of many of WM's practices. We got burned one time which was some time ago, and have been very aware of checking weight, count, ingredients, parts, etc. I'm not saying they couldn't slip something by us, but it would be unlikely.
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Americans are very uninformed on stuff that matters. Sure we know who won the world series and who hit the most home runs for the season or who made the most touchdowns or baskets. Who had the most traveling penalties, but many still think Iraq attacked us on 911. Many can't even point out their own state on a map. That's how we got GW Bush for 8 years and why we have Obama as Dem candidate and McCain as Rep candidate. How can you be expected to know or even care that Wal Mart and it's ilk uses virtual slave labor and has their suppliers pollute to their hearts content in the name of profit. Then they advertise how good corporate citizens they are. Not much has really changed since the 19th century. Greed and ignorance rules.
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snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Such merchandise is clearly marketed under Walmart's "Great Value" brand. All merchandise is presented in its original packaging, clearly marked with all required labels such as content, weight, volume, nutrition, etc.

Those, too, are clearly marked.

Yet you perpetuate them.

Wrong.
Walmart ran afoul of wage and hour requirements YEARS ago when it was revealed that SOME workers had worked off the clock. It is unclear whether the workers were pressured by management to do so.
Today, the biggest rule, by far and away, is that one does NOT work off the clock. Management is adamant about it. There are large (bilingual) signs at each time clock forbidding working unless clocked-in.

Walmart is extremely accommodating with merchandise returns and other customer concerns. Still, there will always be the customer that is dissatisfied regardless of any outcome.
Remember, also, there are those that, not too much unlike shoplifters, will intentionally take advantage of Walmart's liberal customer satisfaction policies.
My wife was mistreated by a returns Associate as was my son-in-law - the latter over a mere package of moldy pita bread. Much depends on the Associate with whom the customer is dealing and how much experience and training that Associate has had.

That's too bad. It is a great place to work and shop.
:) JR WM Associate
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Also hardly WM the only one trying to sneak by. I have worked at a couple hospitals over the years where most of the nurses got a nice "bonus" because we were expected to sign out on time yet also get our work done.

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wrote:

Now I'm totally confused. Quotes around bonus like it doesn't mean bonus but then what does it mean? You signed out on time, did some of your work after signing out, and then got extra money? Or extra work? You're too subtle for me.

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