Want to replace old flat tv cable with better coax.

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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 02:05:08 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

RG-6/U is 75 Ohm. RG-58/U is still fairly common for ethernet.
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 02:05:08 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Not sure what you have but it may be called jamais vu, never seen. The feeling that you've never seen something when in fact you have seen it. You may even know logically that you've seen it, but you feel like you haven't.
Sort of the opposite of deja vu, the feeling that something was already seen.
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wrote:

After David's post, I realize you really have never seen it. :)
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Maybe. :)

How did you do that? Soldered one wire to the center and the other to the braid? I'm curious, but as others have said, you should redo it, and run straightaway to a tv or a signal splitter, if you want to go to more than one tv. They still sell them for flat lead.
I would also pay attention to the way the wire is run now. Flat lead should have stand-offs to keep it away from the pole and the siding, and as someone pointed out, it should be twisted I can imagine that some prior amateur or neat-freak kept the wire untwisted because he thought it looked better. So if they didn't do a good job the last time, your job can be better. (The interference will still try to interfere, but its effect on one part of the flat-lead will be exactly the opposit of its effect on the other part of the wire, so the two effects will cancel each other out. Hence, no interference. This is similar to the reason that wires from burglar alarm sensors use twisted pairs of wires, so that lightening won't generate a voltage spike in the wires that will damage the control panel (or set off the alarm?).

Yes.
They're not so much heavy duty as they are designed to keep the insides dry, with the rubber cover and all.

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How did I connect the twinlead to the coax? I used two cones and twisted them. Center to one lead, outside to the other lead. This was meant to be a temporary solution (two years ago.)
At any rate I have one more question, if I go twinlead all the way from the antenna to the TV (almost to the TV, I'll have to switch over just before cable runs up the wall behind my tv) should I be concerned with grounding? As I explained before, coax is well grounded just before entering crawlspace. Will I need to do the same for twinlead?
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Cones?
Wirenuts?
Are you in the USA?

LOL
My mother paid a tv guy to connect our tvs to the rooftop antenna, back in 1957. When I was in the attic several years later, a little before she was going to move, I saw that he had just twisted the wires together, even though there was a flatlead antennal splitter hanging right there, not being used.

The purpose of grounding iirc is for lightening protection. Lightening protection is NOT accomplished by providing a path for the lightening to reach the earth. A conductor would have to be enormous to accomplish that (as big as your thigh?).. It's accomplished by providing a path for excessive charge in the antenna or any piece of high metal to dissipate to the earth, so that the lighening will not be attracted by that charge.

This question is beyond me.
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mm wrote:

Back in those days there were a lot of fly-by-night TV repair shops. Most breakdowns didn't require a great deal of skill to fix, and the industry was much less regulated than it is today. Someone could read a few books, buy some tools and tubes, and set up a business.
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This is boring. Skip to the last paragraph at the end.
It's possible, remotely possible, that he brought the splitter, tried it and decided he was getting better reception, all in all, without it. I think the antenna lead only went to one room, the den?, and my mother wanted a tv in the bedroom too. (Although I don't remember us having two sets. !!! or what the second set would have looked like. After the Dumont broke, we got a Zenith with remote control. But that was in the den. Plainly I do remember the three runs of flatlead twisted together,(one from the antenna and two from the sets) so we must have had two sets.)
Or maybe the previous owner had an antenna wire in the living room and that's why there was a splitter in the attic, but I don't remember seeing such a wire.

The industry is regulated today? I'm serious. I haven't heard anything about this.
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jg wrote:

Hi, Coax impedance is typically ~50 or ~70 Ohm range depending on the type and it's so called unbalanced feeder vs. twin lead is 300 Ohm balanced. Balun means Balanced/Unbalanced kinda transformer to keep the impedance matched for minimum signal loss. Buy good quality coax like Belden brand and use also good quality weather tight balun. You connect the balun at the antenna terminal, screw in coax at the other end of balun. It's done. Good luck, Tony
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Thanx to all who replied and helped out. I've installed a balun tranformer at the antenna and I've replaced the entire run with RJ6 coax cable. Picture quality increased drastically on all channels. I've got my antenna pointing 206 degrees yet I can still pick up channels 29 (103 degrees) and 19 (143 degrees.) (My antenna's fault I'm sure.) At any rate the local stations (Sacramento) all come in super clear, so I'll leave it as it is.
Thanx again.
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jg wrote:

The antenna's 'fault' proved to be a benefit in your situation. Sometimes it's better to have an antenna like yours which has less gain (sensitivity) for weak stations but a wider beamwidth, so you can receive stations from different directions without needing a rotator. It's a trade-off that sometimes pays off. Nice work.
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If you ever get the urge, buy a good long distance antenna and put a rotor on it and see what you get! B
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