Wall Oven Supports

We're replacing a very old double oven with a single Thermador unit, and the installation spec calls for installing 2x4 supports. I can't get anyone to do it in time for the new unit's arrival so we have to do it ourselves.
What method/hardware should be used to secure the supports to the cabinet walls? The diagram suggest that the 2x4 be perpendicular to the wall, but that would seem to require some pretty big screws. What's the best way to do this?
Heres the install doc:
http://www.bshextranet.com/files/techtoolbox/SE%20&%20C%20Install.pdf
Thanks
Stacy
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Stacy wrote:

Can't see your cabinets, but can yo trust their walls to bear the weight? If you can, I would use some sturdy "L" brackets to support those 2x4.
Looking at the diagram on page 4 I see two "legs" cut to size from the floor level to the 2x4s . Those legs can also be 2x4. I would put also 2 legs on the back and two more in the middle and secure all 6 to the 2x4s with the brackets.
So, 6 brackets for the legs, 6 to the cabinet wall ( 1 at each end and one in the middle) and enough screws to put all that together. Shouldn't go anywhere, but I would also secure the foot of each leg to the bottom of the cabinet.
What about the electric box, is it in a good place for the new oven?
Hope this makes sense
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It's 32 pages and I haven't found the page in question. I'm not going to read the whole thing. And I don't understand your question about big screws to mount 2x4s. Sorry.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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Sorry! Page 4. Its right at the beginning so I didn't think I needed to cite the page.
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I don't know yet about the electrical box because we haven't removed the old oven yet (they're coming Monday). The only thing with what you say is that we wouldn't be able to put another oven in the lower part of the cabinet, which we may want to do. I would assume that there are only post supports in the back in the diagram so you don't block the use of the lower part of the cabinet?
Currently there is a double oven that sits on a shelf (which is the top of a drawer located under the current oven. Wouldn't that imply that a shelf screwed into the sides would be enough to support a single oven? (I assume there is some sort of framing around the cabinet, but its under a fancy veneer and I don't want to risk damaging it)
One thing of note: The cabinet is in the corner, so the back of the cabinet is not flush against the wall. So wall studs will not be able to be used. I think there is a bit of space behind the cabinet.
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Stacy wrote:

Do you know the dimensions of the future bottom oven?

you may be right.

Not sure which one you're getting, but the heaviest single is 240 pounds. Do you know how heavy is the old double? Probably heavier..
Anyway, is that shelf at the right height (dimension D on page 5?. If not you may have to put 2x4 s or another shelf at the correct height.

When you remove the old one, you should be able to see how that shelf is secured to the cabinet. My guess is screws or nails in the frame of the cabinet. you could secure those 2x4s or the new shelf the same way May want to choose the lenght of the screws very carefully.
Also, you'll probably be left with a hole in that cabinet (the difference in height between old and new ).

I see, is it secured to another cabinet?
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Carpenter wrote:

no, thats why I need the supports.

Yes, the panal to cover the opening is another matter, probably for the woodworking group :)

I don't know (yet).
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I am in the middle of doing the exact same thing, including installing a Thermador oven. However I am changing from a 27" wide to a 30" wide and have had to build a new cabinet for it.
Don't expect to accept delivery, wire it up, slide it in and turn it on. Your old oven probably has a fuse/breaker box somewhere close to the old oven. Your new Thermador may have something else, or a plug that will need a matching receptacle. I haven't received mine yet, so I don't know either, and the manual does not give that information.
I did not use 2x4s, but built a floor out of doubled 3/4 plywood to take the weight.

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EXT wrote:

Well, the old oven is being taken away on Monday and an installer is delivering the new one on Thursday. The installer will take care of the electrical (they'd even adjust the cutout if the new one needed to be bigger). So we just need to provide a place for them to slide it in.
Why are you going to so much trouble to use the 30" oven? The 27" Thermadors are big; big enough to fit the biggest Turkey you can buy probably. If you were buying some smallish oven like a Bosch I might see needing 30", but I certainly wouldn't rebuild cabinets for it.
Stacy
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The reason we are changing from 27" to 30" is because here in Canada most manufacturers only supply their very basic model in 27" sizes, and the ones with their features are only provided in 30" sizes. We are also were told by the manufacturer's representatives that they are standardizing on 30" size for the bulk of the models for North America, and are planning on limiting the 27" models for economy and limited space situations such as apartments, the same as they have done for stand-alone stovetop/oven units.
Rebuilding the cabinet is no big deal, I also had to revise the fridge location to accommodate a 48" built-in from a 36" stand-in.

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Hmm. I don't know what "limiting them to apartments" means. What are there 20 million apts in North America? When you say "you were told by the manufacturer, what does that actually mean? They're only shooting themselves in the foot by making ovens bigger than the spaces that people have available. If Thermador only makes 30" ovens and I have a 27" cutout then I buy a DCS. Frankly I'd rather have a DCS or Dacor anyway. But since you get 10-15 years from an oven I don't see why anyone would care what they plan to do in the future. Its not like you're going to trade it in in 2 years. The only argument I'd make is that a 30" is the same price as a 27", which makes it a better deal. But not if I have to redesign part of my kitchen in the process. Then its way, way more expensive.
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Stacy wrote:

OK, so they took away the old oven this morning, and I'm a bit surprised at what I see. Under the old double oven, which from the way the two enormous men were struggling weighed about 200lbs, was supported by 2 3/4 x 3/4 runners with 3 1.5" screws each, and a 3/4 particle board shelf over them. No special supports in the rear. I'm wondering how these could have worked? Is the weight distributed so evenly that such small supports could work? I'm thinking of using the same shelf (since it fits perfectly of course) rather than the 2 x 4 runners. If there is no framing behind the cabinet ( I think there is framing in the front but not the rear, how much weight can a shelf thats just screwed into a 3/4" cabinet be expected to hold?
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