Troubleshooting a toilet leak

Bought a new American Standard Cadet bowl on Fri. Installed it and the wax seal was did not seat correctly. I could tell because 1) it leaked after being flushed several times and 2) when we removed the bowl it was only pressed into the wax in two small areas.The flange is about 1.25" below the newly refinished floor, and the floor is not level. So I buys a waxless solution made by Fluidmaster, their 7500#. Installed it and the bowl. Still have a leak. Checked the seal by touch from the floor ceiling below. It is sealed around the toilet horn. Only one spot I cannot reach and am making the assumption that if the seal is touching the bottom well over the horn on the sides checked then it probably is sealed where I cannot physically ascertain the seal. Turned off the cold water for the day today and found that the leak had subsided or stopped, it had been dripping at the rate of about 1 drop every 10 - 15 seconds. When I arrived home I found no noticeable dripping and that the water level in the bowl had gone down to the point where it would be difficult to drain any more by hand. The tank which was left full did not empty into the bowl. I am thinking that the bowl is cracked somewhere and letting water seep out. Is it logical to make the assumption that if the water in the bowl goes down and the cold water is turned off then the leak is in the bowl itself? Or is there something else going on?
(This is my final challenge in the remodel and would like to spend a little more time on it before calling a plumber.)
Thanks in advance, Bill
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Probably what you need is:
1. a new seal with a deep throat to better close off the joint between the pipe and the toilet base
2. a beeswax seal to go between the toilet base and the new seal - beeswax is a much better seal.
3. longer flange bolts to better lock the toilet down. got to overcome the height of the new floor re;lative to the flange.
M.O.
1. Thoroughly clean all the old sealant from the toilet base.
2. Remove the old, shallow throated seal from the floor.
3. Replace old bolts with longer ones.
4. Insert the beeswax seals.
5. Gently set toilet on new flange and wiggle it a bit to help seal fit.
6. Sit on your throne to force the seals to take. When all this is done the crapper should be flush with the floor.
7. Tighten flange bolts till toilet stays put - do not over-tighten as the ceramics break easily and cannot be repaired.
8. Turn on the water and pray it does not leak.
Good luck
--
PDQ

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"Bill" < snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net> wrote in message
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Re Install using 2 wax seals, one with the plastic ring another without. Get them good and soft before hand. A good practice on every install......... Tom
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On Wed, 09 Nov 2005 07:21:26 -0600, Trekking Tom <> wrote:

xxxxxx

Thanks for the replies, The leak stopped magically after being in use for a day....Think I forgot the last part...Sit on the toilet!
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