Toilet Wax Seal ?

Hello,
Regarding the wax ring seal under toilets -
Would you expect that if it is beginning to go, or has gone "a little", that you would see water leakage only when you flush, or all the time ?
How long do these things typically last ? Are there new types, or is it still the waxy material ?
Thanks, Bob
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Water only hits the ring during a flush, or if the toilet is leaking. There's nothing wrong with a wax ring if the rest of the installation is sound. There are was rings that have a plastic horn (I like these), and there are waxless gaskets (I've never used one of them). http://www.terrylove.com/forums/showthread.php?t 43
R
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On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 07:51:08 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

I wish I could use these. The drain makes at turn and I cannot get the waxless to seat deep enough to set the toilet. No way to modify the one I tried. The product did state it fit "most toilets" or smilar words.
I look one day for improved version :)
-- Oren
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"Fernco waxless toilet seal" - I used one the last time I pulled the toilet. I will never fool around with the wax type again. For one thing, the Fernco one is reuseable (on the same toilet) in that you can pull the toilet and replace it without having to mess around with the seal.
Harry K
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wrote:

Amen to that. I had to replace a toilet and reinstall two others recently and I used the Fernco seals. I will never go back to wax rings!
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Why not? What is the advantage? My upstairs toilet has never been removed in 30 years, my downstairs was replaced about 15 years ago and not touched since. What would a different seal do for me that the wax is not? How often do you guys remove your toilets?
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wrote in message

Obviously there's no need to replace something that's working fine. But should you ever need to, don't bother with wax. There's a better way now. The Fernco seal cost $5, seals better, no messy wax.
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Advantage 1: Want new flooring in the bath? Just pick up the toilet and replace when done.
Advantage 2: No more squirming around trying to get the toilet to seat solid.
Advantage 3: If you ever do need to pull the toilet, no messign around scraping old wax off the floor and toilet.
Bottom line: Technology moves on. It makes as much sense to me to go back to wax type as it would to buy a new Model T for my next commute car.
Harry K
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I would have used a Hummer for the commuter car analogy. The Model T got pretty damned good gas mileage - something like 25 MPG, IIRC. But I do take your points about the waxless ring. Next opportunity I'll try one out. Thanks.
R
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only when you flush. The leak might be coming from a crack instead of a bad seal. Does the toiler sit properly, or can it rock back and forth?

I've only seen the waxy variety.
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Robert11 wrote:

It will leak when (just after) flushing. They can last a long long time, but if the floor settles or the toilet is knocked/bumped, it can break the seal. If the flange is too low in the floor - you can stack two rings.
a
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*This one has been pretty well covered.

*Until you need to pull the toilet or if the floor has become uneven, usually due to wetness and warping of the floor sheeting and especially if the sheeting is MDF. When you pull the toilet be sure to check to see if there has been long term leaking which may have gone undetected until now.

*Well covered.

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It would smell like sewer gas first, If its leaking it also stinks.
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Robert11 wrote:

Why wax? What's that a hold over from the days before rubber was invented? rubber would make a much better seal.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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Blattus Slafaly 0/00 :) wrote:

Considering that wax molds much better than rubber how would rubber provide a better seal?
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What is better to seat a toilet to the floor, a wax ring (old school) or the new rubber ring? http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t '1819
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From what I read when I was plumbing our house, the wax ring does a better job with variations in toilet and flange heights. Rubber alternatives work great if properly sized to your exact gap, but you could have leaks if the gap is even slightly larger than the rubber ring is designed for.
Old school has worked well for decades, so I chose wax rings for our toilets. Although, I did use the rings with the plastic "funnels" attached, to ensure waste goes down the pipe and not around it.
Anthony
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