tight lug nuts

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"J Burns" wrote in message
I bought tires a couple of months ago. Yesterday I tried to remove a wheel to check the bearing. The nuts wouldn't budge.
They're supposed to be torqued to about 65 foot-pounds. After letting penetrating oil work overnight, I got 15 of the 16 nuts with a cruciform wrench with 10" arms. I used a pipe to extend one arm and stood on the other.
I believe I'm applying well over 200 foot-pounds. The wrench twists so far that I think more force would be dangerous. I'll see what tools neighbors have, or maybe go to a mechanic.
Can I have the dealer and his crew sent to prison?
Years ago I had Sears install snow tires on my truck. Was on a back rough road and had a flat. I was bending my 4 way lug wrench. No results. Drove into town to a station I bought gas from. They finely got the nuts off with an impact wrench. Never bought tires from Sears again.......WW
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I've read most of this tread and I only have three comments:
1. I also use anti-seize compound on wheel lugs and have never had any problems doing that.
2. I also buy tires from auto wrecking yards. A good set of tires should last a good 10 years or more, and often that car with the new tires gets into an accident after only one or two years with those new tires. It's the auto wrecking yard that inherits those tires when they bring the smashed up car in, and generally the tires are an excellent buy.
3. In regard to the OP's problem with the overtightened lug nut, I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Torque Sticks so far in this thread.
'Torque Sticks, Torque Sockets and Other Discount Tools' (http://tinyurl.com/pdkocaz )
Torque Sticks are 1/2 inch drive extension bars that are machined to precise diameters so that they act very much like a torsion bar spring. You simply put the Torque Stick in between your impact wrench and the socket you use to drive the lug nut, and it tightens the lug nut to a predetermined torque depending on the Torque Stick you're using. That is, you simply put the Torque Stick on the impact wrench, and then the impact socket on the Torque Stick and tighten the lug nuts. The Torque Stick will tighten the lug nuts up to a predetermined torque, after which the twisting of the Torque Stick will absorb the impacts of the impact wrench, and the lug nut won't be tightened any further. The OP needs to go back to the place that overtightened his lug nuts and explain to them how their using Torque Sticks is good business practice because it will keep customers from throwing Molotov cocktails through their business' front window.
Here in Winnipeg, it's rare to see a garage that DOESN'T use Torque Sticks when replacing the wheels on a car.
--
nestork


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I repair roll laminating machines that apply plastic to paper. Every now and then I find a machine I CAN NOT loosen the allen screws on:( drilling them out, ruining sprockets and other parts are a heal pain.
Occasionally the DIY repair person reports I always know when the allen scres are tight, since they go click click click:(
Very expensive for the machines owner:(
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wrote:

torque.
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rbowman wrote:

I find that my el cheapo air impact works well for that . Similar quality to HF , can't remember where the son got it , but he was unhappy with it and I got it for like half what he spent .
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2014 08:32:55 -0400, Stormin Mormon

had one change torque.
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On 9/24/2014 1:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm not all sure what is different, your shop or mine. I may never know.
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2014 17:53:08 +0200, nestork

beyond the 5 or 6 hits recommended.(ratatatatat)
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jeep,and many other American makes used LH studs at one point or another At one point ALL lorries in britain had left hand studs. Some (actually MANY) medium and heavy trucks still do.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Wasn't them Dodge and some European vehicles?
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wrote:

them "hit" more than once - then finish them up with the torque wrench. 2 hits with my old CP734 was usually about 65 ft lbs on 120 psi shop air.
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why don't you ask him when you stop by and have him test the torque on your lug nuts?
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On 9/24/2014 1:21 AM, J Burns wrote:

Two of my sons had called me to bring my tire wrench as the one supplied with their cars, a Saturn and a Mercedes, would not take off the lug nuts. They had used penetrating oil. The Saturn I got bailed out but wrench was to fat to fit Mercedes hub.
A similar story with air pressure in my new Subaru's tires. After running a couple of thousand miles I checked them and found them at 40 psi vs 30 psi spec.
I think in all these cases it was the manufacturers fault.
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Frank wrote:

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Frank wrote:

40 psi when cold is too much over inflated. I usually fill the tire ~5% higher psi when cold.

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On Thursday, September 25, 2014 2:38:45 PM UTC-4, Tony Hwang wrote:

I always make sure to use 80% nitrogen when inflating tires now.
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On 09/25/2014 04:13 PM, TimR wrote:

I always make sure to hold my breath when inflating my tires at home to make sure the tires don't get too much carbon dioxide in them.
Perce
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On 9/25/2014 2:38 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

This was summer. The Subaru dealer told me that tires were inflated higher at factory as in shipping and storage they did not want to have to add pressure if needed. Guess you could also blame dealer in not setting to specs.
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wrote:

Correct. I'm not sure when they started doing it, but up through the mid-late 1970s, Chrysler Corporation vehicles had left-hand thread lugs on the left side, right-hand thread lugs on the right. Tighten the nut in the same direction the wheel turns when the car is going forward.
I'm not sure exactly when they stopped, either, but my 1985 Dodge truck has RH lugs all around.

No, it didn't. The left-hand-thread lugs were on the left hand side wheels, and the right-hand side wheels had right-hand-thread lugs.

Broke a stud, I can believe. I've seen that before. "Pulled it clear out" through 3/8" plate steel? I doubt it.
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"Doug Miller" <>>> Forget the details but in years past, some lug nuts threaded

I know Chrysler cars had left hand nuts on the drivers side. I changed a bunch of tires working for Sears while going to school. I was cautioned about that when I started working there around 1970.
I don't know for sure,but heard that some military vehicles had alternating left and right on the same wheel.
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