tight lug nuts

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I bought tires a couple of months ago. Yesterday I tried to remove a wheel to check the bearing. The nuts wouldn't budge.
They're supposed to be torqued to about 65 foot-pounds. After letting penetrating oil work overnight, I got 15 of the 16 nuts with a cruciform wrench with 10" arms. I used a pipe to extend one arm and stood on the other.
I believe I'm applying well over 200 foot-pounds. The wrench twists so far that I think more force would be dangerous. I'll see what tools neighbors have, or maybe go to a mechanic.
Can I have the dealer and his crew sent to prison?
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wrote:

A 3/4" impact wrench will spin them off but you should be able to crack them loose with a breaker bar and your pipe. Use a 6 point socket.
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On 9/24/14, 1:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

for impact wrenches. I understand one advantage is that if you hammer on the breaker bar, the socket will transmit shock to the wheel around the nut. It seems to transmit the shock pretty well but hasn't worked so far.
My BIL has a 3/4" set. I used to use it on farm equipment. That might work.
Dadblamed tired dealer! I wonder if the lugs and nuts are permanently damaged from the stress.
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On 9/24/2014 1:52 AM, J Burns wrote:

Wow, that must be tight. Are you pressing down on the wrench, to the left of the lug? I find that works, compared to lifting up to the right.
On lug nuts. If the wheels are aluminum, the tire places want to recheck the lugs after 25 to 50 miles. This is a real concern. I did a rear wheel brake pad slap one time, and figured they were fine. Two days later, I had a rather serious shake. Took it to my garage, and he noted that the right front tire was out of round. On the way to the junkyard to get another tire, the left rear fell off.
Mechanic had not asked if I did anything to the wheels lately "Well, replace brake pads in the back" and had not pulled the snap caps to see if the lugs were tight.
I share the blame, I didn't recheck torque after 50 miles.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

You buy tire from junk yard? You put your life on the line with junk tire?, LOL!

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On 9/24/2014 10:06 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

They worked for the last guy.
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On 9/24/2014 1:52 AM, J Burns wrote:

Years ago, someone mentioned the hot wax method. When a nut and bolt is rotted on, the trick to heat it up with a torch. Of course, mechanics the world around use heat. But the trick is as it's cooling, light a candle and drip wax onto the thread. At first, the wax disappears into vapor. But as it cools, it gets to the magic temperature. The wax sucks into the threads, and acts as a lubricant. Wax is slippery, try rubbing a candle some time, to see for yourself.
I've not tried this, though I have wondered if there is any truth to this. I'd really love to know if this works or not. Please try it, just to humor an old man.
BTW, I did try soaking a totally rusted pair of fence pliers in concentrated hydrochloric acid. It did eat the rust off, and now I've got a working pair of pliers. I never thought that would work.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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wrote:

I accidently misplaced my very expensive Krauter electric pliers outside, then found them a year later seized solid. just kept them mourning their loss. Then, after watching the 'remetallization' process our Brulin's quaternary sanitizer was doing [Unicide 256] soaked the pliers in the compound,not only did some/much of the rust turn back into metal, but the pliers started to open very stiffly. Kept working on them and now have my pliers back!
Have you ever tried Whink [mild hydrofluoric acid] to remove rust? Be sure to wear gloves! Eats under your fingernails, but you don't realize it until an hour later when it feels like your nails are being constantly ripped off. So mild doesn't do much damage to porcelain - tried to etch glass and it won't.
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On 9/24/2014 9:43 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

Nice to know some thing works.
As for HF acid, I refuse to get near the stuff. Some HVAC guys use that on coils, since they end up looking shiny and bright. I like the alkaline cleaner, which works nicely.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Next time, try phosphoric acid. You can find it in the masonry section of a big box store since it's used to etch concrete. The advantages are that it will attack rust and not the underlying metal so you can leave the item in the acid without worrying and it leaves a phosphate coating that inhibits rust. With hydrochloric, you have a super clean, etched surface that will rust in front of your eyes if you don't get some sort of protective barrier on.
If you read the ingredients in Coke, you'll find phosphoric acid which is probably why it's alleged to be a rust remover. I wouldn't drink the stuff straight but it's far less aggressive than hydorchloric.
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On 9/24/2014 10:06 AM, rbowman wrote:

HCL did the job, I had some on hand, and the experiment was a success. Why would I try some thing different? Does phosphoric work better? I guess you do mention a couple advantages. I put some oil on the fence pliers, and they are still good.
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On 9/24/14, 10:06 AM, rbowman wrote:

I once had a 3-year-old license plate that was badly pitted with rust. Naval jelly, red lead, white enamel, black enamel for the lettering. Still perfect 10 years later. If I ever get put in the state pen, I want to be on the license plate team!
Vinegar can remove rust.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I use it in motorcycle gas tanks. The older ones are prone to rusting but can often be salvaged with a inner coat of epoxy. The idea is to remove the rust and not eat through the tank. With phosphoric, you can fill it up and leave it for a week or two with no problems.
If you neutralize the phosphoric acid with sodium hydroxide, you'll wind with sodium phosphate and water. That's an excellent preparation for cleansing your colon. (don't try this at home, kiddies)
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J Burns wrote:

Read the label. Naval Jelly is an expensive way to buy phosphoric acid.
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On 9/25/14, 10:58 PM, rbowman wrote:

between naval jelly and navel jelly. Navel jelly is the stuff you put on English muffins.
Amazon says the list price for 16 ounces of Loctite Naval Jelly is $6.29, and the list price for 32 ounces of Duda Diesel Phosphoric Acid is $35.95.
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J Burns wrote:

There might be an opening in Deer Lodge. When I registered a bike last spring they gave me a xerox reduction of a temporary car tag and told me to tape it to something. Seems there was a statewide shortage of motorcycle license plates.
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J Burns wrote:

You're not making CocaCola so you don't need food grade acid:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Klean-Strip-1-gal-Phosphoric-Prep-and-Etch- GKPA30220/100406369
Naval Jelly has its place if you're doing spot rust removal where the thick consistency is helpful. If you're dumping a bunch of rusty items into an acid bath or, conversely, filling a rusty tank the liquid is better.
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On 9/26/2014 10:15 AM, rbowman wrote:

Just heat it up with a torch, and drip it on like the hot wax method.
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On 9/26/14, 10:15 AM, rbowman wrote:

If I had a rusty tank, I wouldn't fill it with cleaner. I'd read the manual. You're probably supposed to use army jelly for tanks.
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J Burns wrote:

I'm not Paul Allen; I can't afford a tank although one would be fun.
http://www.sfgate.com/nation/article/Paul-Allen-sues-over-German-tank- purchase-gone-bad-5749592.php
http://snipurl.com/29agghr
Ironic. Allen is vocal about gun control and he wants to buy a tank. I guess it's just hoi polloi that shouldn't be armed.
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