Soap Scum Removal ????

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I have a problem with soap scum all over the shower doors. Part of the problem is from the rotten well water here which when combined with the soap gets hard as a rock. I've tried every useless bathroom cleaner on the market and nothing touches this crust. Does anyone know of a chemical that will cut the scum ???? I've tried every brand of bathroom cleaner as well as white vinegar..... HELP !!!
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Didja try CLR ?
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Yup...............
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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 14:26:19 -0400, against all advice, something

How about DW-40?
<oh, just kidding>
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Don't laugh, it may just work.
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Brian wrote:

A little baking soda on a damp cloth or just my hand works fine for me. Soap scum is waxy stuff that results when calcium or magnesium in water replaces sodium or potassium in soap. Without much scrubbing, the sodium in the baking soda can replace the magnesium or calcium in the soap scum, turning it back into soap that will rinse away.
Adding salt to the baking soda makes a more abrasive mixture which may help if the soap scum deposit is thick.
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Brian wrote:

Textured or smooth glass? If smooth, scrape it off with razor blade scraper. Then use Scrubbing Bubbles...best stuff there is for cleaning bath/showers.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I have also had good results with "Dow Scrubbing Bubbles" cleaner.
Jon
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Steam clean?
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Try the DOW scrubbing bubbles. Spray it on, wait 2-3 hours, scrub with a brush dipped in household ammonia, rinse. You may have to repeat the cleaning. Use a daily after-shower spray product, any brand will do.
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Use a hardwater castile soap. You will feel cleaner and there will be a lot less soap scum.
Jimmie
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Forgot to leave the name, Kirks Castile soap. Its not everywhere but I could always find it in OKC where the water there will knock the bottom out of the bucket its so hard.
Jimmie
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If you don't mind working with pool acid it will do the trick. I have taken shower doors from one of my rentals outside and laid them on the grass and poured pool acid on them and scrubbed with a long handle hard bristle broom like you'd use around the house to sweep stuff into a dust pan. You want to be careful not to get acid on yourself, wear eye protection, etc. But it will work and fairly quickly. It didn't even seem to hurt the grass. Hose the area down well when done.
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wrote:

The problem with that is hydrochloric acid eats the aluminum frame of the door.
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On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 01:50:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's what I thought would happen but I was surprised that it did not seem to do so. These were so bad it was either acid wash them or replace them. Keep in mind that the frame was no longer shiny to start with so maybe whatever "eating" it doesn't really doesn't make it look much different. The ones at my home are frame less.
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On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 01:50:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Agree with you about hydrochloric acid. A milder acid is Sulfamic Acid (by TILELab), made for tile, grout and concrete. Mix it weak and I'm guessing no harm to metal frames. Of course rinse frequently.
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wrote:

vinegar works well too.
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You're talking about "pool SHOCK"? Hmmm. That's CONCENTRATED bleach -- maybe basic, not acidic?
David
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wrote:

pool acid is not pool shock.
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Well, then what IS "pool shock"?
THANKS!
David
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