Sears incompetence

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That's from the original long gone Western-Holly cooktop which presumably drew air from the counter space it was set into hence a seperately provided vent. The KitchenAid you see there (probably 15-20 years old itself) has ventilation into the box around the edge of the top.

Yeah, most definitely. Also Western-Holly circa 1957 or so. It has a nice commercial oven look to it. The double oven was not standard for the subdivision so the original owner must have specified it.
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: > When shopping for things that have to be installed, ***always*** shop the : > small, locally owned businesses.
: OK...what do I look for in the Yellow Pages to find a local guy who : installs a kitchen range hood?
I'd go to your local catholic church mass on Saturday night or Sunday morning, on the back page of the bulletin are ads from community based businesses and there is usually at least one who does that sort of installation...
If it were my folks, I'd buy it from someplace where installation is part of the deal or I'd do it myself... Now you have the problem of owning the part and trying to get someone else to install it...
Might just return it telling Sears you bought it from them expecting them to install it and then buy it from a place that will install it...
We bought our new washer/dryer from Sears (we go thru them sorta often here), they set it in the spot and removed the old washer/dryer, but refused to do the gas hookup claiming they don't do that anymore for insurance reasons... I was disappointed and it seems to me in the past they did (might be because of ownership changes) and we haven't bought from them again... when we bought the new oven from BestBuy that was our first question, will they do the entire install and they said yes (and they did...)
An eighth of a inch isn't that much... those vent panels punch out and I would think since metal is cutable and bendable that the stack included would be plyable enough to make that sort of change (we replaced ours, and it's not that hard, i mean, your not running new vents to the roof or wall...)
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Have you found that workmen who put the Pisces symbol in their ads and/or who advertise in the back of the Order of Worship at the local church are any more honest/fair/trustworthy/etc. than a random selection from the yellow pages?
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generally the guys in our parishes weekly bulletin are all reliable and have been advertising for a long time and are seen around the parish and church, which means more credibility.
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: >I'd go to your local catholic church mass on Saturday night or Sunday morning, : >on the back page of the bulletin are ads from community based businesses and : >there is usually at least one who does that sort of installation...
: Have you found that workmen who put the Pisces symbol in their ads : and/or who advertise in the back of the Order of Worship at the local : church are any more honest/fair/trustworthy/etc. than a random : selection from the yellow pages?
Those who advertise in the back are usually very local (live within a mile of where you live) and are pretty accessable. Also because they rely on word of mouth they strive to do a good job because they only cover the area you live in... Someone who covers a wide area can do a bad job for a long time before it catches up to them, someone who covers a very small area won't be in business long if they do poor work...
I found the guy who did our garage roof in the bulletin and I still don't understand how he was able to reroof a 22x22 garage (no tear off) for $250 and make a profit...
He has since moved to vegas, but I had him do a few other jobs for me afterwards... he did siding for someone I knew down the street and he didn't like how part of it turned out (as far as I know, she didn't complain and I didn't notice what he was complaining about either) so he ripped it off and redid at at no charge to her saying he drives by it every day and he didn't want people to think he did bad work... you want to find a handyman who just happens to be a perfectionist as well...
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Actually I shopped a variety of stores, both specialized, and general, looking for the hood. My criteria was it should be stainless steel, 36" wide, 7-8 or whatever "thick" (not one that goes way way up to the ceiling), compatible with a rear exhaust duct (10" wide or whatever the standard is; sorry I don't have all the specs here) and I preferred the controls for fan and lights on the front as the old Nutone unit was. I didn't want bottom of the barrel junk but not super expensive either. Some Nutone/Broan units fit the bill. I selected the Kenmore ELITE model, which is made by Nutone/Broan, because while similar in outward appearance I preferred how, when looking up from under it, all you see are the two large metal mesh filter panels (which pop off for washing) taking up the entire area except the lip where the two lamps are. I liked that better than designs with various nooks and crannies that would probably be difficult to keep clean. Price was a bit over $300.
I would have installed it myself but decided maybe it was better to get a pro to deal with the issues involved. I had no idea the pro invoked by the seller can only handle the simplest jobs. If it had been that simple I would indeed have done it myself in the first place. As for why call Sears for installation, well it's only natural since they are the seller of the product.
At this time we are deciding whether I should just do it myself after all, or return it to Sears since they are unable to install their own item.
Wow...a range hood being installed where one was just removed. Same size and same make even. It's not like I was asking them to install it atop a 50' chimney.
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Sears (and other large stores) contract with a company for a set price to do a set job. There isn't room for custom work in this arrangement. I get from your original statement that they didn't even come out to the house, which is understandable. They contract with the store at a low price based on volume, so driving to your house cuts into any profit. You may have done better if you didn't reveal the extra work required on the phone, and the installer may have made the hood fit to get paid for your job.
Anyway, an appliance installer is not going to want to move your cabinet. That is outside the scope of what they do. The contractors hired by the big chains are not paid as well as contractors that work for smaller, specialty stores. The guy that advised you to contact a small kitchen remodeler is right. Otherwise, you would need to contact the installer directly and arrange to pay them directly for the work to get additional work done.
You're also changing your story here. First you said they may have to move a cabinet 1/8", and now you're saying "same size and make even". These are two very different stories.
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I'm still not understanding the initial problem all that well. Can you post some pictures? Did you buy a new range hood that was the same size as the old one or not? And if so what's the problem?
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I have not changed any story. Both the old unit and new one are 36" models. (They come in 30", 36", sometimes in 42") That is what they are called. The actual measurement of the new unit, as I recall it, is about 1/8" under presumably to allow fitting into a 36" space. The space, from brickwork of the oven stack to the left to the cabinet on the right is a bit over 36".
I tend to call 36" the nominal dimension but that may imply it's an average and surely they are all precisely undersized the same amount. Maybe it should be called the rough dimension for the space it's going into.
The reason it can't just go right in is that the area to left of the cooktop (and behind it and around the sink etc.) was tiled with a tile that is maybe 3/8" thick and this tiling goes right up to exactly where the old range hood was. The tiler cut the tile to fill the space exactly so now with the old hood down there is an area open (untiled) that exactly matches the left side profile of the old hood.
If the side profiles of both hoods were the same it would go right in although there might still be a need to temporarily move the cabinet to the right to get into position since tiles to the front would block sliding it straight back from the front. Maybe one could angle it into that space first on the left and then bringing up the right. A moot point because the side profile is not in fact the same.
If the tiles were cut and removed to get back down to the brick for an area matching the side profile of the new hood then it will fit ok just as the old one did. If the cabinet is moved to get the range hood into place then it would then go back where it was.
OR
If one has to mess with the cabinet anyway it could be remounted about a half inch farther to the right in which case the range hood could mounted with the tiles left as is and hood left side just touching them. In other words the hood would be mounted one tile thickness farther to the right than the old one was. This offset is a bit more than the tiny excess of space created by the fact that the hood is a hair under 36" and the overall space is bit more than 36".
The length of the explanation makes it seem more complex than it is.
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wrote:

Doesn't matter, it's clearly too complicated for a sears installer. They did you a favor by not doing it. They would have messed the whole thing up big time if you had them try.
Hanging a hood is no big deal. You seem to know all the details, why not just do it yourself?
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post a jpg
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Steve Kraus wrote:

DO you know from an actual measurement or a diagram in the manual that it is only 1/8" less? A lot of appliances of nominal 30" width, range from 27 to 29 1/2". Carpentry isn't a very precise craft, and when multiple elements come together as in a kitchen, usually they're pretty generous about the fitment.
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Nexus7 wrote:

Yeah, most carpenters are fairly _liberal_.
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If you have a "standard" installation you can't beat the price from Sears or other "big box" store.
If you don't have a standard installation you either DIY or pay MUCH more for a local small businessman to sell and install the replacement.
"Around here," for an example, Home Depot and Lowe's will have their contractor install a patio door for $500 (or less). They also have good prices on the doors.
A local company wants $800 per door for an installation without special problems. They also charge a few $100 more for equivalent door that the big box store.
That's just the way it is.
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No, it isn't. My local appliance dealer delivered and installed a dishwasher for $50LESS than HD would do it and they did it the next day. They delivered and set up the washer the same day and charged less.
I bought an 8' Pella slider that was a better model than HD sold and paid $300 less to have it installed by a local. You may not find tat type of service where you live, but I certainly can beat the big store every day for items like that.
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....and then you go and tell 5 people how happy you were with the work. These small dealers must be nuts. :-)
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for
I'm quite happy for you.
But that's not how the prices go "around here."

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Sounds like you don't have enough competition there.
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Not right now.
There is still a "housing boom" going on. It's just starting to lose steam but there is plenty of work still out there.
We have a LOT of government jobs here so we just don't "feel the pain" of you folks who live in the real world.

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How many locally owned kitchen dealers would you estimate you have there?
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