Rethinking "Made in China"

Page 15 of 16  

"Leon" wrote:

I give up.
Lew
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"hot" water heater? I only need a "water heater". ;!) Iknow, I know, it reheats relatively hot water, but would a hot water heater work if it were full of cold water?
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wrote:

Why would you want electric water, whether it be hot or cold?
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LOL... good'n I would rather electric water than gassy water
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 17:51:01 -0600, Leon wrote:

Define "cold". My water comes out of the ground at a pretty much constant 55 degrees year-round, and that's considerably hotter than freezing ;-)
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 08:25:17 -0600, Jules

Mine sure doesn't. There is a big change in the shower handle position between summer and winter. When I lived in VT we were lucky it came out liquid in the winter. ;-) The frost line often went down 7' and not all water lines did. Since we had a domestic hot water coil in the boiler, the hot water temperature varied quite a lot too.
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krw wrote:

Same here. But ours isn't due to ground temperature, but the storage temperature of the water tanks. During the summer, don't need much hot water at all for a shower, during the winter, we need to turn down the cold water considerably.
If the water is coming out of a well, then the temperature is going to be pretty constant year-round. In general, that means cold. When I was growing up, I'd see pictures of kids on TV running through sprinklers having a grand old time. I'd try that (on a farm with well water) and I'd last for a couple dashes through the water before I had to give up. I think our water was about 60 degrees. It wasn't fun.
--

There is never a situation where having more rounds is a disadvantage

Rob Leatham
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 19:45:08 -0600, krw wrote:

Yeah, that'd do it, I suppose. Our line's around 7-8' down and only goes maybe 30' out to the well. Temp seems to stay pretty constant year-round.
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 09:22:22 -0600, Jules

Because you're on a deep well not because the lines are down' 7-8'. The ground temperature isn't constant (in northern climes) even 20' down. OTOH, at 400', and in the water table, it will be fairly constant. ;-)
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Incorrect as usual. Do a little research on "geo-thermal" HVAC systems and get back to us. They make use of the fact that groundwater is, in fact, a constant 55 degrees. They don't drill to 400 feet to get that, either. It's the same temp in New Mexico as it is in Rochester, New York.
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But, is paying $800 for a more efficient ....read energy conserving, not colder.... gonna save you any money? Not likely before it dies and you need to spend another $800 another new one.
nb
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wrote:

Well you have to also consider and I have had to factor this in before. If the unit is old you must admit it may be on borrowed time, may be not. But if you wait till it fails the food is going to be a costly factor added to the cost of replacement if you don't catch the problem quickly enough. You really never consider that angle till it happens.
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It will when you end up paying the true cost of the energy used.
TMT
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On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 19:44:15 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

The best available freezers 30 years ago were within percentages of the efficiency of the run-of-the-mill freezer available toda, and the difference from the poorest to the best today is something like 7%. Thirty years ago, foam insulation was already becoming standard on the premium units. The vast majority of today's PREMIUM units will be in the scrapyard in 20 years or less. Many don't last more than 10 years. The cheap stuff is even worse. They may still cool, but the shelves are falling out and the doorseals are leaking, and they piddle on the floor like a 6 week old puppy.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:
<snip>

In UK in the late 1950s already, when I was becoming seriously interested in photography, I don't think any American cameras were considered high quality. The really good stuff was Leica (German) and Hasselblad (Swedish? -- both mucho expensivo). Praktica (E. German) was OK. Some of the Japanese brands were coming onto the market, IIRC. I'm not sure that Kodak was considered a serious photographer's camera.
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Olympus made at least one fantastic camera around that time - or was it the early sixties? I had an Olympus PenE, half frame SLR that took fantastic pictures.
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<snip>
As another poster said. They make what we ask them to make, or they make what we will buy. I think the latter is the truer statement. If everybody who said (myself included) "I am sick of buying cheap crap from China" actually stopped buying cheap crap from China. They would make better crap. How do we all stop buying stuff made in China. I have no idea. While picking up the family Christmas cards at Wal-Mart tonight the kids wanted Santa hats. $1.50 a piece - made in China. I bought 2, my Dunkins this morning cost more.
To the poster who mentioned about how Japanese made used to be a joke. When I was a kid, I am 46 now, my dad owned a NAPA store. I can remember the comments when a customer came in to purchase parts for a Datsun or a Toyota. The joke was the price of the replacement part would double the value of the car. Not so much anymore.
Larry C
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Then the pendulum swung the other way and Japanese products were considered the best (cameras, electronics, etc) when, in fact, they were no more great than when they were considered crap. I had a closet full of dead Japanese stuff that barely made it to warranty. Perception is a lot of it.
The price thing about car parts is a little more complicated. When Japanese cars first hit our shores, parts were insane. $600 for one CV joint for a Civic. Later, aftermarket mfrs/rebuilders got into the act and drove prices waaaay down. I bought a PAIR of rebuilt joints for the same car for $125. Later, when rebuilding a Honda alternator, I got Honda parts cheaper from the dealer than the local discount parts store. Pays to shop around.
nb
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Somebody wrote:

-----------------------------------------------------
During the 60s, I was involved with bearing applications for automotive electrical systems.
There are more basic 203 ball bearings manufactured than all the rest of the bearing sizes combined.
Had the guy representing Japanese bearings come calling with some impressive stats as well as very attractive pricing.
As a bearing supplier competitor remarked, "First the bearings, then the alternator, vacuum sweeper, etc."
Took about 15-20 years, but they got there.
Lew
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 16:56:34 -0800, David Nebenzahl

I have a Linhoff Teknica 4x5 and an array of lenses that I still use occasionally. The results I get are astounding. Worth the price just for that wonderful compensating bellows on the back.
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