Rethinking "Made in China"

Page 12 of 16  

On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 09:07:55 -0500, clare wrote:

Yes, but they make up for it by often costing a small fortune when something *does* go wrong...
... plus I like keeping it simple; if something does go wrong when I'm out in the middle of nowhere, there's more chance I can fix it by the roadside in an older vehicle than a modern one. I like that safety and convenience.
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 10:23:03 -0600, Jules

Not so much now. It's not like the '80s with the GM "computer controlled" carburetors. I had to replace all of the spark coils (two at a time - they wouldn't replace them all the first time) on the '00 Sable. It was a couple of hundred each time, but that's not so bad.
I did spend $3K on my '01 Ranger, but that was everything from breaks, to break lines, transmission lines, radiator, and whatever. The Vermont salt got to them and the Alabama summer finished them off.

The more chance you'll have to. I *like* fuel injection and all of that. The only repairs I've ever had to make to a fuel injection system was a leaking distribution rail in my Vision and that was under a (silent) recall. My '78 Granada went through at least a carb a year. While it was usually only $100 to fix, $100 was a lot more money then and fuel on the windshield wasn't a nice feeling ("I don't believe it's supposed to do that").
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 11:07:22 -0600, krw wrote:

Well, I suppose a lot of the cost these days is in the labor to fix it, so if you can do stuff yourself you save a lot - but the parts on more modern vehicles that do go wrong always seem to be more complicated and therefore more expensive to me.

I have issues with any computer-controlled stuff, though. If it was accessible, they gave me full schematics and a copy of the firmware then I wouldn't mind; I can fix it myself if it does break. But I really don't like stuff that's "black boxed" like that and considered not to be field servicable.
Agreed on the "mechanical" side of FI, though - definitely better than a carb (although I've stripped and restored a few carbs now and they're not too bad and *should* work for a long time before they next need to be messed with).

How come? Was that a known bad design, or was something else causing the failure (the fuel used, lack of fuel line filter etc.)? I suppose it does matter how many miles you were putting on it, but I'd expect a good carb to go for close on 100k miles before needing major surgery.
(I'm starting to feel sorry for all these woodworking folk putting up with this thread :-)
cheers
Jules
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:05:22 -0600, Jules

I've found that I spend *way* less on repairs over the life of a car than I did 20 years ago. It's unusual for anything other than wear parts (brakes, tires, etc.) to go bad anymore.

It doesn't break, though. I have no use for schematics or firmware. I'm certainly not going to take the time to learn what makes it tick, much less rewrite any of it.

I have no idea. It was a 1bbl Carter but couldn't even get the one lung working right. Rebuilding it was a waste of time (they once tried it four times in three months). They were cheap but being without a car wasn't.

That's why thread kills were invented.
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:05:22 -0600, Jules

Terrible carb, and most of the "rebuilts" were even worse.

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I've also done timing with the doghouse off. Wasn't that a bit hot, with all the hot blast from the radiator coming into the passenger compartment?
Yep, good old WD. I found the ground on the ignition module troublesome.
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My old '62 Dodge Lancer with slant six and AT got 22mph on highway.
nb
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notbob wrote:

Bet that was a hazard. Watched a lot of bumpers did you?

--

There is never a situation where having more rounds is a disadvantage

Rob Leatham
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notbob wrote:

As long as we're bragging, my 1970 Ford Custom got 9mph.
'Course it had a police interceptor engine, a calibrated speedometer up to 140, an 8-quart crankcase, and, believe it or not, a DELCO alternator.
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 17:33:47 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

What good's a speedo up to 140 if it won't go beyond 10mph? ;)
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You can see how much room you've got for improvement!
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Somebody wrote:

Police vehicle?
1970?
Delco alternator?
Very doubtful.
That was Leece-Neville business back then.
Lew
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 00:27:42 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

Could have been replaced with a Delco.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Leece-Neville and Delco alternators in that size for an automobile engine resemble each other if you don't look closely. Back in the 70's GM, Ford and Mopar alternators and AC compressors were quite distinctive. I hardly recognize them these days without a hard look. I think Chrysler started putting Asian alternators and compressors on its vehicles some years ago.
TDD
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 08:51:01 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Except the Delco mounting brackets wouldn't fit a Ford wirhout MAJOR reworking, and the L-N bolted right in.
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 15:23:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Still could have been replaced. I can imagine a small town with only 2 or 3 squad cars being in a hurry to get them back in service with whatever they could get their hands on fastest.
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 16:08:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Which in the case of the heavy duty alternators WOULD have been the Leece Neville - They OWNED that market in those days. The 180 amp? delcos were scarce as hen's teeth.
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 23:23:20 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My scenerio remains very possible. Who says they replaced it with a 180 amp delco? I'm saying they did what they had to, to get the car back in service ASAP. Or, who knows? Maybe the alternator failed just before they were going to get rid of the car, and they put in the cheapest thing they could graft in there. Adapting brackets would be trivial.
A friend of mine had a Military Surplus Jeep that he bought at an auction. The alternator was totally shot. An exact replacement military alternator was $345. The Civilian alternator he installed cost about $40. Was it the equal of the original? I sincerely doubt it. But it got his Jeep through inspection and on the road.
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 10:00:19 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

An the FACT remains, ford alternators are every bit as available, and generally in those years cheaper than a standard Delco. Putting in a Delco would necessitate rewiring for the regulator as well, unless they hacked it with a "one wire" delco - which didn't exist untill 10 or 15 years ago.
Accept it - your recollection was wrong.
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 12:55:59 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My recollection?
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