Poulan chainsaws

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I've never owned one but I am considering purchasing one from Amazon...
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
The price is right but I am concerned about the quality. Reviews seem positive but I figured I check with this newsgroup for opinions. After years of fighting with Homelite chainsaws (trying to start )its time for a different make.
Thanks, cj
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Better than the Homelite, not as good as a Stihl or Husquvarna. For occasional use it should be fine.
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Stihl, Husquvana or Echo would be my choice.
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On 3/31/2013 11:25 AM, cj wrote:

saw made by Husqvarna, in the same price range and it's fine for me. If you want it for farm or professional use, get a Stihl
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I have a similar model from Mccullough - 50cc, 20in bar, 78 link chain. Bought a few years ago for a similar price. Just a few coments - think about the bar size and the motor size.
20" is great if you plan to take down some serious old growth but is way overkill for most homeowners. I bought it because I had a willow with a substantial trunk blow over. There are a few drawbacks - you won't find a lot of 20" chain availble at the big box stores, so a quick dash after breaking one may not be in the cards.
A 50cc engine is OK, but does get heavy after a while, especially doing side cuts, which leads to the chain jumping the bar, which leads to the bar getting messed up or the chain tab bent.
I don't think the perfect starting 2 cycle exists. They all do great at first but eventually take some effort after a few seasons - even if they are drained and cleaned. The trick I use when the engine is cold is to prime the engine, set the choke and then pull with the throttle full open. The lever that holds the throttle open doesn't hold it open enough.
Most consumer stuff is built in China these days, no matter what the brand. That's not a knock on China - they build to a price point they are given, but brand loyalty is meaningless on the low end.
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All the major saw brands, Stihl, Husky, Echo, etc. build both consumer and professional grade saws. Poulan, Homie, etc are consumer only and very cheaply made at that.
I have 3 stihls, 2 consumer grade, 1 pro. Oldest one is some 15 years old and still starts just like it did new, as do the other 2.
Major thing with two cycle equipment is to never put them away for any lenght of time (say over 2 weeks) without draining the fuel and then running them dry.
Harry K
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# # All the major saw brands, Stihl, Husky, Echo, etc. build both # consumer and professional grade saws. Poulan, Homie, etc are consumer # only and very cheaply made at that.
Poulan is owned by Huskvarna They manufacture many different brands in North America.
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aYes and my answer still holds. Poulan chainsaws are consumer grade only and poor ones at that.
Harry K
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I USE electric CHAIN SAWS, AS A MATTER OF FACT i HAVE 4:) When the chain gets damaged by hitting a old nail in a branch, or other problem occurs I just swap saws and keep on cuttng:)
Used to use gas, but for the occasional use once or twice a year electric is better it always starts
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I have about 300 feet of heavy-duty extension cords that I use with my two electrics. I also have a generator that I can move around if the cords are not long enough.
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On 03/31/2013 08:25 AM, cj wrote:

I had trouble starting my Homelite as well until I cleaned the air filter. Runs like a champ now.
Of course, I had to put my pride aside and start it the *exact* way they said to in the instruction manual. That was probably the hardest part.
Jon
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On 03/31/2013 12:37 PM, Steve B wrote:

I use mine once or twice a year, and after use I drain the tank and run it dry.
If you do this simple procedure after use, you can avoid having stale gas, something that applies to any brand of saw.
Never had a problem with warped gaskets.
Jon
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On 3/31/2013 11:25 AM, cj wrote:

After years of fighting with Homelite chainsaws (trying to start )its time for a different make.

The top professional tree services use Stihl because you can't make money when your chainsaw is broke.
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On 03/31/2013 01:51 PM, Your Name wrote:

Yes they do; if you are a tradesman it makes sense to buy the best tools you can afford.
For the rest of us, lesser brands often suffice perfectly well, unless of course the tool is needed for "compensation" purposes.
Jon <--- who is very happy with his Homelite
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Jon Danniken wrote:

Yes, and you can deduct the cost of the saw and fuel as a business expense on your taxes.

--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 3/31/2013 11:25 AM, cj wrote:

Also keeping it running. After a winter storm last year it would not stay lit. Then during the past summer no problem. When you need it , it should be there. But it wasn't always.
If you need it for sure, get a Stihl. If you can leave the debris for another time, the poulan might work for you.
--
Jeff

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On 03/31/2013 02:28 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Sounds like it needs to be tuned.
Jon
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What is the procedure, and what is included in a chainsaw tuneup? I've got a Homelite that gives me trouble. Be interesting to know. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Sounds like it needs to be tuned.
Jon
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On 04/01/2013 07:10 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Start with the air cleaner and a new plug, and always run it dry before you put it away for more than a short amount of time. That got mine (a Homelite) working "like new" again, and should be considered part of any standard tune-up.
Unfortunately, "like new" has to comply with EPA regulations, and generally results in a "too lean" condition. Fixing this required removing the limiter caps on the carb (use the drywall screw trick) and opening them up a little bit (maybe my saw was just a little lean, I don't know, but it helped a lot).
I also increased the idle speed a little bit to keep it from stalling out on me when I set it down.
Finally, I put a better chain on mine, an Oregon 91 VXL. This chain has no kickback prevention, so I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who isn't extremely aware of what causes kickback, how to prevent it, and how to live through it when it happens. In other words, I probably wouldn't recommend to anyone.
I also bought an angle guide to help me keep the file at the right angle when I sharpen the chain, because without it my angles aren't consistent.
Doing the above to my used $40 Homelite has it cutting through even hardwood like butter.
Oh yeah, I also removed the screen from the muffler, but I honestly didn't notice any difference from that.
Jon
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Thanks, that sounds useful. I do have another air filter, some where. And, spark plugs I do have. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Start with the air cleaner and a new plug, and always run it dry before you put it away for more than a short amount of time. That got mine (a Homelite) working "like new" again, and should be considered part of any standard tune-up.
Unfortunately, "like new" has to comply with EPA regulations, and generally results in a "too lean" condition. Fixing this required removing the limiter caps on the carb (use the drywall screw trick) and opening them up a little bit (maybe my saw was just a little lean, I don't know, but it helped a lot).
I also increased the idle speed a little bit to keep it from stalling out on me when I set it down.
Finally, I put a better chain on mine, an Oregon 91 VXL. This chain has no kickback prevention, so I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who isn't extremely aware of what causes kickback, how to prevent it, and how to live through it when it happens. In other words, I probably wouldn't recommend to anyone.
I also bought an angle guide to help me keep the file at the right angle when I sharpen the chain, because without it my angles aren't consistent.
Doing the above to my used $40 Homelite has it cutting through even hardwood like butter.
Oh yeah, I also removed the screen from the muffler, but I honestly didn't notice any difference from that.
Jon
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