Poison ivy

Page 2 of 4  

wrote in message

specifically for this

you can pinpoint where

spray mist would takeout

dead. You want the

Check the label.

remove the plants and any

until Fall for this. Wear

every when you're

afterwards. (I always

peal!).
Thanks for your input. This is going to be a lot harder than I thought. I have to get rid of it before fall because I'd like to have siding put on my house soon and the contractors have all said they won't deal with the poison ivy. I searched the web and found 2 chemicals that should be able to kill it. Glyphasate and triclopyr. I am going to try and find a concentrate of one of them. Another poster suggested Garlon but I don't see that for being for poison ivy, just blackberries. I've got the sprayer but I think I'll get another to use just for poisons. I plan on getting those paper suits and coving every inch of my body. I wish I had a friend who wasn't allergic!
Thanks again to all who responded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you sure that's not Glysophate? That's Roundup.
Get the concentrated version, maybe mix it 2 or 3 times stronger than the instructions, and add a teaspoon of dishsoap per quart.
Put on some dishwashing rubber gloves.
Get some cheap cotton gloves, stuff with a little cotton batten, and then put the gloves over the rubber gloves.
Dip your hand in the concentrate. "swipe" the plants with your hands, so the whole plant (I'd cut the stems a foot or two up, ignore the stuff above the cuts) gets thoroughly dampened with the stuff.
[This is how a professional botanist eradicates the stuff.]
Glysophate is _quite_ innocuous to animals/humans, so this is not dangerous. Just don't go overboard getting it on you. Wash up, and dispose of the cotton. The rubber gloves will be okay with a rinse.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

Unless sensitive to poison ivy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Oops. Right. Make that "okay after a wash with strong soap".
[There'll be very little transfer in this situation, but better safe than sorry.]
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You are not making the Roundup strong enough. Mix it double strength or even a little stronger than that.
I question whether this is poison ivy though. I never heard of poison ivy crawling up amything. It's normally just a ground plant getting a foot or so tall. Of course there could be other varieties that I dont know about. However, this sounds to me like the decorative ivy that people use intentionally for decoration. If that's all it is, you can just start ripping the roots out and pulling it. Some of the universities have photos of nearly all plants online.
If it's only growing against the house and not in the lawn, I highly suspect it's the decorative ivy.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is definitely poison ivy that grows as a vine. I just whacked some here in NJ yesterday that was growing up a tree in the woods at the border of my lawn. The root was about 1 1/2" in diameter at the base. It went a good 20+ feet up the tree. You're right about needing the Roundup to be strong. I used it at about 10%, whiere 1 or 2% is fine for most common broadleaf weeds and grass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14 May 2005 12:06:19 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yes, I have the vines as well, and they grow like crazy!
They do make a brush killer labeled for poison ivy, but I've had good luck doing the following:
I cut the vine a foot or two from the last root. I take a small container of full strength roundup, and dip the cut end of the vine (the part that is still rooted in the ground) into the pure roundup and leave it for several minutes. (when I'm working with the ivy I wear protective clothes, gloves, and eye protection.)
This usually kills the vine within a week or two. It's a pain to do a bunch of vines, but it works. I've thought about an alternate method, but haven't tried it yet. Cut the vines as above. take a cotton ball and dip it into full strength roundup. Place on the end of the vine, and cover with a piece of aluminum foil crumpled to hold it on the vine. With this method, you could do a whole bunch without taking the time to soak each vine. If you try this, be sure to collect the foil pieces and cotton balls and dispose of properly.
While we're on the subject, a company called Gemplers (www.gemplers.com) sells a product called (IIRC) Technu, that you wash with after exposure to poison ivy or related nasty. It claims to be effective even when used hours after exposure. When I'm out mucking around in the areas I know there is ivy, I wash off my arms and legs with it afterward, and it really does seem to work. It's a lot less messy than those barrier lotions you put on ahead of time.
Insert usual disclaimers.
HTH,
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 14 May 2005 16:21:47 -0400, Paul Franklin

I vote to burn the house down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ups.com...

vine. I just whacked

tree in the woods at

in diameter at the

You're right about needing

10%, whiere 1 or 2% is

I'm in Burlington County. It's poison Ivy alright.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kathy wrote:

I cur it off at the base and let the vines die, then when the roots start to put out new ivy in a few weeks or a month and it is a small area of green then I hit it with round up. Kills it dead without using a lot of chemical. make sure to cover up when working with the ivy or poison. By then the vines have died and removal is less hazardous. And whenever I mess with poison ivy I clean up with orange gojo any where I might be contaminated before turning on the shower, really cuts the oil of the plant off your body. ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kathy wrote:

Clip at the bottom. Cover stem with coffee can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1015.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@my.point.com wrote in wrote:

I vote you go inside first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just give them to a welder for a couple of weeks. If you get enough oil into the leather, and you have serious allergic reactions to PI, I would just toss them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not a matter of treating, but of removing the oil residue. I'd not use them again, except for more poison ivy removal. Meantime, I'd keep them in a plastic bag so no one accidently handles them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/27/2010 9:53 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Those long heavy welders gloves are great for picking up trapped feral cats too. :-)
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Go to WebMD, look up poison ivy, they mention two chemical used to clean/dissolve the toxic oil. If I have a chance, I'll look.
But, as an oil, it should be soluble in detergent as well, which should help. Or, shmearings with vegetable oil, followed by detergent.
Vegetable oil will remove some shop grease that even detergents have a problem with.
--
EA

>



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cheryl wrote:

Urushiol cannot be deactivated by normal means, and is very persistent. The only solution is to remove it with detergents, but I do not know if these would work with leather. More importantly, if you have ever had a reaction to the resin in poison ivy, you would know that the only answer is, "no, throw them away".
In other words, if you told me I had to pay you $50 or I "might" get contact dermatitis, you would have $50.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Soap and water dissolve and remove the oil that causes the irritation, if its on gloves then its probably on your pants and shoes as brushing into a plant releases the plants oil, just wash everything. The palms of your hands have thick skin and are the least supceptable part of your body to Urishiol oil, and if your wash your hands within an a half hour or so nothing should happen. Welders gloves are a bit overkill as light duty gloves will work, but just throw them in a bucket of water with dish washing detergent. The oils remain active for something like 6++ months so wash it off. Google about it for more specific informaton. Once I pulled doen vines and burnt them, didnt shower and didnt know I was breathing Poison ivy burning, I had about 250 welts on each arm, was sick for at least 6 months from breathing the smoke, and I spread it over my body from not washing. I pull it mistakenly now and notice it poison ivy to late, I just wash off my hands with a hose and some soap now and no problem. The important thing is removal of the oil within about 1/2 hour and not touching any other part of your body.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I detox after poision ivy exposure with a rag wet with gasoline. Figuring it will kill whatever is on me
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.