Photocell adapter that do

JJ:
J > Anyone know of a photocell light adapter (to implement dusk-to-dawn on/off J > on an existing light fixture) that doesn't cut the light output of the bulb J > (at least not significantly)? J > J > I've tried these screw-in adapters from the hardware stores and they work, J > but they bring the light output of a 100-watt bulb down to about that of a J > 60-watt bulb (or maybe even less). I've tried using a 150-watt utility bul
J > and that didn't make any difference.
Doubt if you're going to find one (watch the next post say otherwise!). The "problem" is the photocell is an electronic device with quite a bit of resistance to it.
As you probably have found any "light bounce" inside the globe will cut the photosensor -- assuming it's the 'variable' type and not the strictly on/off like most built-ins. Minimize any internally reflected light; some sort of hood may help. The hood might 'backfire' in that the light will be turned on at an earlier time and off later.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
*  Walking in my winter underwear...  
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RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
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Not familiar with these photocell things but is it possible that the light from an open (or flood) type bulb is shining back to some extent into the photo cell? Thus reducing the amount of electricity supplied to the lamp which then 'burns' dimmer? Or is the reduced light just a function, all the time, of these simpler screw in photo cell adapters. I ask because gather that some of these things are not necessarily an ON/OFF device? If that were so would it be best to 'hood' the bulb so that its light is directed away from the photo cell sensor? Or use a photo cell unit that switches to fully ON or OFF states. I installed a couple of those for a friend and they appeared to do the completely off or completely on job, quite adequately. As it got dark, at some point, adjustable by a sort of shutter across the photo cell window, the light would come on and barring headlights or something shining right at it, the photo cell controlled light would stay on all night! Conversely, have been told that occasionally very bright street lamps will interfere with some photo cell controlled lights; but always in the context that they go OFF due the glare from the street lamps due to rain or diffused light in fog? Comments/criticism on this post appreciated. Terry.
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Terry wrote:

Most lower priced 120V photocell sensors use a triac to switch the load. You can avoid the flickering and drop-out / falsiing problems by using a photocell that switches the load with a relay, such as these:
http://www.intermatic.com/?action=subcat&sid#6
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