OT Tire pressure sensors

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Ron wrote:

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On 10/24/2013 1:08 PM, Bill wrote:

Well, I've only had to do it once (so far) and I just wanted to make sure I got it right by the owners manual.
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On 10/24/2013 12:03 PM, Ron wrote:

I've had Buicks for 20+ yr and none have had anything remotely resembling that--simply 'RESET' from the monitor for the tire pressure screen display field when cycle thru variables.
This holds from the first that were simply an imbalance indication (no absolute nor even identify which tire just an anomaly) to the present that are absolute pressure for each wheel--the reset was the same.
The 300M Chrysler was essentially same w/ a slightly different interface to the computer--when got back to the farm it had too hard a suspension and too low ground clearance for the dirt roads so replaced it w/ another Buick (the Enclave as it has 20" rims for clearance and AWD for the mud and sand).
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On 10/24/2013 1:27 PM, dpb wrote:

Well.... http://www.gmtruckclub.com/forum/showthread.php/130797-Reset-TPMS-in-Chevrolet-Traverse-amp-Equniox-GMC-Acadia-amp-Terrain-Buick-Enclave
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On 10/23/2013 10:41 PM, Bill wrote:

...

What in the world vehicle is this on???? Some firmware engineer needs firing over that one...
GM vehicles are simply manually set pressure w/ tire gauge to desired and then hit a 'Reset' button on the monitor screen...there are very slight differences in where the function's hid but if you've done one you can figure out any other that I've seen w/ only a few tries...
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On 10/24/2013 8:47 AM, dpb wrote:

The above is for a GM vehicle.
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On 10/24/2013 01:05 PM, Ron wrote:

yes, it's irritating. Especially on one that requires tire rotation with every oil change. If you don't do it, if you pick up a screw you'll be scratching your head trying to figure out which tire is actually low. BMW's reset procedure is much easier (essentially selecting "reset" from a menu) but this is one rare instance where GM's implementation is actually better in some respects, as it allows you to scroll through the actual pressures of each wheel on the display.
nate
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On 10/24/2013 12:05 PM, Ron wrote: ...

Which one(s), specifically? I've never seen such and had almost exclusively (one Chrysler thrown in) for the entire time of the pressure sensor era...
I want to be sure to not ever have one--it's another thing to check for that one wouldn't normally--like whether there's an actual antenna on the radio or not (who'dda thunk that wouldn't be on a vehicle but the '10 Enclave doesn't :( ).
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On 10/24/2013 2:00 PM, dpb wrote:

I've already posted this once but here it is again and this covers the 2010 Enclave....
http://www.gmtruckclub.com/forum/showthread.php/130797-Reset-TPMS-in-Chevrolet-Traverse-amp-Equniox-GMC-Acadia-amp-Terrain-Buick-Enclave
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On 10/24/2013 1:11 PM, Ron wrote:

...
Oh, we've been talking two different things -- that's for the replacement of a sensor and the recalibration of the system--I apparently misinterpreted the first posting responded to's pont of reference.
I was just speaking of how to reset the alert after an alarm situation/tire repair/etc. I can understand that swapping out a sensor is more involved to reprogram the CMOS constants; I've never had to do that in the entire time of all the vehicles that have had pressure sensors.
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On 10/24/2013 3:10 PM, dpb wrote:

No, that was after rotating the tires. It even stats in the owners manual that the after rotating the tires to "Reset the Tire Pressure Monitor" Page 10-50.
And the steps to reset the monitor are on page 10-49.
Maybe you have never had to do it because the tire store reset it after installing/rotating tires?
http://www.buick.com/content/dam/Buick/Global/master/nscwebsite/en/home/Owners/Vehicle_Manuals/01_Images/2010-Enclave-Owner-Manual.pdf System.
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On 10/24/2013 2:42 PM, Ron wrote: ...

I've never bothered to rotate tires--can't see it's ever made any difference presuming keep vehicle aligned and proper inflation since advent of independent suspension. Of course, on these gravel roads wear isn't such as would see if only drove on paved roads, either...
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On 10/24/2013 3:07 PM, dpb wrote:

About the last car I can recall that "religiously" rotated tires on would probably have been the '69 Charger... :) -- and even that would have been pretty irregular. Once the bias-ply 6.70-15 nylon cord construction disappeared, there really was little need afaict.
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On 10/24/2013 05:43 PM, dpb wrote:

GM FWD cars chew up the outsides of the front tires like you wouldn't believe. If you don't rotate you'll end up replacing the fronts 2x as often as the rears.
nate
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On 10/24/2013 6:13 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

Not just GM. All FWD cars wear out the front tires much quicker than the rear. I've never heard of anyone (until now) not rotating their tires.
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On 10/24/2013 06:43 PM, Ron wrote:

Well, BMW specifically recommend against it.
I can't rotate my summer set as it's staggered, but I'm definitely putting my winters on opposite of how I did last year... I must have a heavy foot, the rears are 2x as worn as the fronts!
nate
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On 10/24/2013 6:43 PM, Ron wrote:

Really? I know lots of people that don't rotate. I'm rather lax about it myself and am way overdue by 17000 miles.
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On 10/24/13 8:14 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I learned a lesson on my Subaru about tire rotation. I waited about twice as long to rotate the tires as I should've. It didn't take long before tires started wearing really badly. The lesson I think is rotate on schedule or not at all. Tires are one thing that have really improved over the years. It used to be common to see people changing tires along the roads. It's fairly rare now.
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On 10/25/2013 6:59 AM, Dean Hoffman > wrote: ...

All rotating does is camouflage the wear by moving a given wear pattern to another location. If the vehicle is set up properly and the tires are properly inflated, they shouldn't have such differential wear.

That depends on how many nails are in the roadways... :) On our country roads there are always things every time they grade them chances are pretty high of picking up something. It's rare to go a month without a flat on at least one of the vehicles. :( Highway/town driving is far safer from that standpoint -- I don't recall when I last had a flat on a trip other than discovering a slow leak on second day out or so.
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On 10/25/2013 2:11 PM, dpb wrote:

I don't know where you are getting your info from, but considering that on a FWD car the weight distribution is roughly 60-40, that puts most of the vehicles weight on the front tires. Not to mention the front tires are steering the vehicle and doing most of the braking putting even more wear on the tires. Like I said, every single FWD car that I've owned (including one of my current ones) have always worn down the front tires quicker than the rears. And I'm not talking about wear patterns (I only had that problem on a Honda Accord)...I'm talking about tread depth. Let me Google something real quick...OK I'm back. Read this....
<snip> Tire rotation or rotating tires is the practice of moving automobile wheels and tires from one position on the car, to another, to ensure even tire wear. Tire wear is uneven for any number of reasons. Even tire wear is desirable to maintain consistent performance in the vehicle and to extend the overall life of a set of tires.
By design, the weight on the front and rear axles differs which causes uneven wear. With the majority of cars being front-engine cars, the front axle typically bears more of the weight. For rear wheel drive vehicles, the weight distribution between front and back approaches 50:50. Front-wheel drive vehicles also have the differential in front, adding to the weight, with a typical weight distribution of no better than 60:40. This means, all else being equal, the front tires wear out at almost twice the rate of the rear wheels, especially when factoring the additional stress that braking puts on the front tires. Thus, tire rotation needs to occur more frequently for front-wheel drive vehicles.
<snip> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tire_rotation
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