Tire pressure

I have a 2013 Hyundai Elantra for which I had to replace a damaged tire a few months ago. I just noticed that the max press on the new tire if 55psi while the max pressure on the other three tires is 45psi.
I inflate them all to 44psi. Does anyone see a problem with that? Thanks
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On 7/6/2018 9:20 AM, CRNG wrote:

Only problem is that 44 is too high, especially in summer. I usually go about 2 to 3 psi more than indicated on the door frame sticker for proper pressure.
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On 7/6/18 9:20 AM, CRNG wrote:

Check the sticker on the driver's door frame or look in the owner's manual for the manufacturer's recommended tire pressure. Use whatever it says there.
44 psi sounds too high. If you inflate to 44 then run on the highway for a while, the heat buildup will raise the pressure above the recommended max. Remember what happened to those balloons at your eight birthday party when your friends blew too much air into them? ;-)
The reason the max pressures are different is that your new tire doesn't match the other three on your car. It has higher specs. Probably not a real big problem unless you moonlight as a NASCAR or Indy car driver.
BTW, the new tire has more tread that your old ones and that can affect handling. Though it may seem counter-intuitive, put the new tire on the rear.
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On Fri 06 Jul 2018 06:40:32a, Wade Garrett told us...

We have always inflated all tires on our cars to the pressure recommended by the car's manufacturer. Why tempt fate? Our newest car has tire pressure sensors and can notify us if any tire's presure has fallen below the recommended level. This has proved invaluable, as we currently have to drive through a construction zone and have picked up a nail on one occasion and several power staples on a second occasion. The sensors immediately notified us of pressure problems.
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On 7/6/2018 5:19 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Those sensors in the tire can go bad as could the detector in the car. Our Subaru's have only one warning light so once all the tires looked OK on my wife's car when the light came on so I inflated them all a few pounds above the called for pressure and the light stayed on. She did not want to drive just ignoring it and it cost $200 to replace at the dealer. I had to get a Toyota loaner once that had pressure for each tire. One got low but the screen did not say which one so I had to check them all to add air. As a rental nobody paid attention to the pressures and when I brought that screen up when the light came on the pressures varied over a 15 psi range.
Years ago a woman totaled my Subaru and I needed a new one as I was going on a thousand mile trip in a month. Car got great mileage and months later I discovered all the tires were over 10 psi above the recommended pressure. Dealer told me they were shipped to him that way as they might be stored for months on his lot.
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On 7/6/2018 5:56 PM, Frank wrote: ...

...
Been over 10 yr now since any new vehicle I've had hasn't had readout of actual pressure for each wheel independently.
While I don't deny it can and does happen, I've never had either a sensor nor readout fail and the sensors are within a pound of the manual gauge. I think they're quite reliable and a real treat...one of the relatively few added gew-gaws that actually is worth something...there are any number of other additional functions I've never used and don't even know what other things there might be--but they have no bearing on getting from point A to point B.
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On 7/6/2018 8:40 PM, dpb wrote:

Don't know when they got mandated. Wife's car is 10 years old and has them but I did not have them on car that would be 15 now. Don't think my 2 year old car has an individual pressure screen but I will have to look. Cars are better these days but all the gadgets can be a pain. First time I had to change the car clock to daylight savings time it took me a half hour to figure out how to do it.
My nephew who owns an auto body shop tells me they add to cost of repairs. I had a 5 year old car totaled 20 years ago. Air bags and seat belts kept me from getting injured by woman that hit me head on but car was totaled probably in part because both air bags went off.
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On 7/7/2018 7:40 AM, Frank wrote:

...

Hadn't realized actually were mandated; Gargle says anything sold after fall, 2007...given the penchant of most folk to pay no attention at all, probably has prevented a number of blowout fatalities that otherwise might have occurred. Of course, there's no way in the world to know altho I suppose somebody has tried to do comparative statistics...
Indeed everything has gotten much more complicated and therefore, expensive...even farm tractor now has so much electronics that a power surge on a neighbor's cost over $10,000 in parts to replace various modules--fortunately for him, much was managed to be covered as warranty work by the local dealer--one not so willing to fight Deere corporate might have been different story.
Give me a '63 Chebby w/ just a modern suspension system and disc brakes, A/C and a few amenities and I'd be more than happy... :)
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On 07/07/2018 07:37 AM, dpb wrote:

I don't want to start a discussion about whether you should or shouldn't but one of the traditional little adders when you bought new tires was new stems. I was wondering how that would be treated with the new sensors. Ah, the TPMS rebuild kit! Can't let that cash cow die.
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On Sat 07 Jul 2018 06:37:09a, dpb told us...

I once hd a '65 Chevy Impala that had A/C and I was very happy!
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On 07/07/2018 11:39 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I once had a '51 Chevy that did not have A/C, AT, PS, FI, air bags, keyless ignition, an ECU, seat belts, cruise control, backup monitors or any of the other necessary stuff. Hell, one fine day it didn't even have brakes; no dual braking system there. It cost me $35 and I was very happy.
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On 7/7/2018 4:26 PM, rbowman wrote:

You overpaid. My '64 Karmen Ghia convertible was equally equipped and it had no working heat. Paid $15. Did not run at the time though, bought it sitting on the side of the road.
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On 07/07/2018 02:31 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Nah, for the extra $20 I got a car i could drive home and it had a working heater. When you live in upstate NY heat is essential. iirc Volkswagen owners tended to build campfires on the passenger side floorboards.
Somehow I made it through my youth without ever owning a VW. I rode in one once and drove one about 100' to get it away from a loading dock. The concept from its inception fascinated me but the closest I ever got was an Audi. Unfortunately that was in the early years when Volkswagen was still figuring out how to build a car with the engine and drivetrain in the front.
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Didn't need heat in Zambia when I owned my only (1949) Beetle
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On 7/7/2018 4:26 PM, rbowman wrote:

Yeah, but did it have those great vacuum wipers like my '51Pontiac?
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On 07/07/2018 08:15 PM, Gil wrote:

Damn straight. Ferry St. in Troy climbs up about 350' from the river and I went up blind more than once. None of the other streets were any kinder. Snow storms were a real adventure.
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I put AC in my 1957 (Dodge) Fargo pickup before heading to the street rod nats in Tulsa in '76 - and I was VERY happy
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On 7/7/2018 7:40 AM, Frank wrote: ...

GM of mid-2000s until at least whenever they introduced actual LCD screen interfaces just rotates the displayed info onto the one-line display with the 'road info' selector button; rotates thru mileage, tire pressure front, then rear, various other stuff...the '99 Chrysler 300M was similar. Don't have anything newer than '10 at the moment...
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On 7/7/2018 9:43 AM, dpb wrote:

I think I have been through all the screens on my Subaru but do recall seeing one for tire pressure. I had to change dates for service and oil changes as the dealer sets them for half the time the manual mandates.
With complex manuals I've known people make an appointment with the dealer to learn how to use the electronics. Even the salesman that sold my brother a Subaru identical to mine did not know how to use them. I went back once when I needed to Bluetooth in a new cell phone and sitting in a car with a salesman on a cold day with engine and heater running he could not set it. Next day when I started the car I heard a ding indicating my cell phone was set. Apparently you have to reboot the computer in the car.
Guy who is retired and teaches part time told me that a lot of the younger crowd will trade in their car for a new one, not because the car is getting old but because the electronics are getting old. Also if out of warranty they can be a costly repair. One of our sons had a BMW where electronis failed under warranty and was told if not for the warranty it would have cost him $3,000 to repair. He sold that car and bought another brand new car and paid for an extended 10 year/100,000 mile warranty.
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On 07/08/2018 09:38 AM, Frank wrote:

When I bought the last Toyota it came with a radio. It didn't work so I called the salesman to make sure I wasn't missing anything. After being assured there was no secret ritual I investigated further and found that dealer prep did not include putting in the fuse for the radio.
With the one before that the salesman did volunteer the information on how to start the car after it thinks it's been in a wreck. This county has more miles of unpaved roads than paved and the accelerometers apparently were triggering on what was just a normal day on a rough mountain road.
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