OT: Is a stuck car accelerator capable of doing this?

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In many of these cases, the person was pressing hard on the accelerator thinking it was the brake!
People are different. ALL sorts of people drive cars including those who are NOT "mechanically inclined". Some elderly people get "confused". Some people are not too bright. Some people "freeze up" in a dangerous situation.
Get one person out of a million who has all of the above traits to an extreme and you have an accident. (The other million would step on the brake, put it in neutral, or turn off the ignition.)
Also some people don't want to admit their mistakes. Or it may be in their best "legal" interest to claim it was the fault of the car.

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This happened to me on a 1992 Ford Van when less than a year old. I could not stop with braking, auto transmission. Was able to shut off ignition. Towed to nearest dealer. They replaced both cables for accelerator and cruise control. Happened again, Towed to nearest dealer. They shot oil into cables. Happened again. Contacted Ford Motor Co. They had me take to original dealer. Ford contacted dealer and told them what to do. The list that was parts changed was a full page of every thing that had anything to do with electronics. Cured problem but never found out what part was the bad one. Never happened again. Still have van. WW
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WW wrote:

I had the accelerator return spring snap on a 1967 Chrysler aircraft carrier. I turned off the ignition, stopped, opened the hood and bent the end of the spring back around the post then drove to the dealer to get a new spring. The Chrysler wasn't really an aircraft carrier, it was just freaking huge. A Chevy Nova ran a stop sign in front of the big Chrysler, the Nova lost.
TDD
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WW wrote:

Glad you posted, many people would think the brakes would stop the vehicle but I know firsthand that they very well may not.
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WW wrote:

I had a '66 chevy van that the throttle linkage came off, and it wanted to maintain highway cruise speed. I unlatched the engine cover beside me (between the two front seats, opened it, and throttled it down with my hand. What's the problem?
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You are exceptional, to be able to do that.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sep 20, 8:32pm, "Stormin Mormon"

I had a Chevy SS Impala that developed a stuck accelerator. Problem turned out to be a broken motor mount.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

put the linkage in a bind, and then it just stay that way. throttle open and engine rared up. They never did fix it. they put cable restraints on the motor mounts to limit the travel when they broke.
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 22:48:41 -0500, Steve Barker

"interlock fingers" that did not allow a de-laminated enginemount to separate. They went steel on steel in the "up" position if the rubber let go. The cable was the "fix" for pre 1969 recall.
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Bob F wrote:

throttle linkage disconnected, and the remaining spring snapped the throttle wide open. The engine went to full song and would not stop/slow down. Fortunately I was on an empty expressway. At about 85 mph I regained my composure, turned off ignition and got it stopped. This linkage setup is most stupid design I have ever seen. The incident convinced me that SAAB's are designed in Sweden by exiled German morons.
EJ in NJ
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yeah,why would engineers design it so the spring OPENS the throttle instead of snapping it closed in a cable failure? were they trying for a light pedal pressure?
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

EJ in NJ
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I could find no reference to that and plenty that the spring closes the throttle. Can you provide any citation to back up your claim that saab throttle springs open the throttle?
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AZ Nomad wrote:

Do you have any info on the 1968 v6 showing that I am wrong??. I don't need a citation. I owned one and it happened to me. EJ in NJ
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EJ Willson wrote:

ago?
BTW this these same geniuses put a downward turning "snout" on the air cleaner that brought the combustion air in just below and behind the the front wheel suspension. If you went through a large puddle (say 6 inches deep) under power, you filled the carburetor with water. Another great piece of design work.
EJ in NJ
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Reminds me of a VW bug I owned. What an absolute pile of shit that car was. At various times, I've had puddles cause my knees to get wet (rotting body) and the interior compartment to fill with steam from water being pulled into the air intake and going through the heat exchangers. Thought the dash was on fire.
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Anything more recent? If I held all car makers accountable for idiocy of 40 years ago, there'd be none left. Don't buy GM because of the corvair. Don't buy honda because of melting civic cvcc carbs. Don't buy ford because of the pinto. Don't buy any car from europe because of the citroen 2CV.
I'm more interested in currency idiocy like replacement turn signal assemblies costing nearly a thousand bucks, or engine compartments that require disassembly of the suspension in order to change an alternator out.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

Yes, on this point I agree with you completely.
IIRC replacing the clutch on the SAAB required pulling the engine. BTW I had a senior moment. It was a V-4 not a V-6
About three years ago replacing an interior rear view mirror on my 1997 E329 Mercedes cost $400.00.
I just paid $US2300.00 for repairs on my 1999 Mercedes C280. There were three problems..The trunk leaked water, The windows had stopped working, and the check engine light was on. To fix the check engine light they replaced the airflow sensor (about $800.00). Fixing the trunk leak (replacing the rubber gasket..over $700.00), and finally fixing the windows ($800.00).
The window problem is another classic in stupid design. As I understand it, on this vintage Mercedes the circuit boards that control the entire car's electronics are located on top of the transmission, just under the shift lever and cup holder. The boards are not sealed from liquid spills. I spilled about 1/4 cup of coffee and totaled the Window circuits. I was lucky..I have a friend who spilled an entire cup of coffee, deadlining her E320. With the tow job and repairs she paid over $1300.00.
EJ in NJ
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I just replaced the mass air flow sensor on my 2003 Sentra SpecV,and the parts places all wanted $300($400 at Nissan) for the sensor -with- housing("remanufactured"),and after much searching on the Internet,found the sensor alone for $78+shipping,for a total of $89 USD(under a different listing). It seems they used the same sensor on several Nissan motors and a Subaru Legacy,too.I could't find anyone who listed the sensor alone specifically for my model.Also,the local parts places all had a core charge for the sensor+housing.So,they're charging hundreds more just to replace the sensor in an old housing,a 5 minute job!
This is just a RIPOFF of customers.There's no need to replace the housing along with the MAF sensor.They could easily sell the MAF sensor alone,it just had two screws holding it into the housing,nothing special or complex. (but they used special security screws...didn't stop ME though!)
Then I had a bad lower ball joint,mechanics at 2 places wanted to replace the entire control arm for $400,I ordered a $15 ball joint from Advance Auto Parts,used their free loaner ball joint press to remove it and install the new one.

well,you aren't supposed to be drinking and driving.
--
Jim Yanik
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wrote:

throttles fail to full open for safety reasons.
On the ground they need to go the OTHER way or the SAME reason.
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