Options to finish wall and ceiling in garage

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I have a 2-1/2 car garage built in the 1940's It is all brick and heavy wood, insulation and paneling. The attic is a walk-in type and is also insulated.
The wiring is also 1940's...
This winter I plan on starting from scratch on the wiring, and rip out the paneling.
I think due to the location and build of the garage it is prone to sweating in the spring and summer. I will add some ventilation and a heater (working on now)
I am a bit leary of drywall due to the moisture. Any other cost effective options to finish the ceiling and walls after I am done with the wiring?
Thanks
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theedudenator wrote:

If the paneling is in basically good shape and not horrific to look at, I'd be inclined to disconnect the existing wiring, and abandon it in place, and rewire with conduit on the surface. Cover the old boxes with blank plates or the new boxes. Much easier to modify down the road, if you or the next owner want to use the garage as a shop. It's a garage, after all. Exposed wiring is not at all out of place. Being a garage, there are likely to be all sorts of things living in those walls you would rather not know about.
What sort of paneling is it anyway?1940s would likely have been T&G. If it is the thin stuff that was popular in the 50s and 60s, no loss, but T&G is about the best garage wall you can have.
-- aem sends...
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The garage is brick, then tongue and groove, then studs, then cheap 60's paneling which looks real bad.
I wanted to pull the paneling and correct any insulation problems.

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theedudenator wrote:

In that case, I'd do some shopping, and build back with T&G, if I could find a cheap source for it. Sometimes the stuff that is lower-grade than people put in their rec rooms and saunas is available at a tolerable price. 'Car siding' is what to ask for. Also a lot easier to install than drywall, IMHO. Just get the starter row straight, and work out from there. Is the brick veneer, or structural? If the paneling is 1960s, the wiring (or part of it) may be as well. You are right, drywall is the wrong thing for a garage with moisture issues, and OSB would be as well. The non-paper drywall they sell for bathrooms would work, but that stuff is pricey enough that T&G may be cheaper. Great thing about T&G is that you can hang stuff anywhere.
-- aem sends...
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I am not sure about the brick. Since there are studs and tongue and groove, I am assuming it is veneer.
Is the brick veneer, or structural? If the paneling is 1960s, the

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Where is the moisture coming from to cause the sweating?
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I have no clue, it happens on humid days. I think because the garage is so well insulated it keeps cold, and when I open the door and let the warm humid air in it sweats.

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Do you like the looks of pole barn siding? I put up the metal siding that is used for pole barns on the walls and ceiling. You can get it in different colors, it is ordered within an inch of the length you need and I didn't have to tape any joints, nor paint. Install and you're done and it can be washed off easily.
Hank
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

I thought about recommending that, but he wants to bury the wiring in the wall. That stuff is a pain to install around electrical boxes. Plus, he already said he has condensation problems- metal walls will just make that worse.
-- aem sends...
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I will need to price out tongue and groove vs drywall.
If the T&G does not cost alot that is what I would prefer...

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wrote:

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The garage is not attached.
I ripped the side wall apart this weekend. From the inside out, studs, 12" wide tongue and groove at 45 degree angle, tar paper then red brick. All of the wood looks good, the paneling and insulation was from the 60's - it is all going in the trash.
I am now planing on drywall everywhere. Any benefit to using the moisture type drywall in bathrooms? Or just go with standard 5/8" and a good coat of paint. I will be adding a furnace and correcting ventilation issues. I have a new ridge vent in the roof, but little soffit vents, that look to be clogged with insulation. This will hopefully fix my moisture issues.
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Unless there is a frequently used shower you don't "need " MR sheetrock in a bathroom...Code may say otherwise however...The only place you need 5/8 Type X sheetrock is the ceiling of the garage and the wall between the house and garage...The rest can be half inch...Cheaper and MUCH easier to handle and install...LOL...Good luck...
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Why is 5/8" called out on the ceilings? I already have wood strips every 16" in both directions. I was not planning on removing the ceiling, just drywalling over the existing.

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Because you have living space over the garage the ceiling in the garage has to be 5/8 Type X Fire Code Sheetrock for fire protection for the living space above...Same goes for the wall between the garage and house IF attached for the same reasons...Both your insurance company and Fire Code requires it.......No ifs , ands or buts....
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I do not have "living" space in the garage. It is a walk-up storage area. A glorifed attic.
So do I still need 5/8's for code?

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On Tue, 13 Oct 2009 03:41:06 -0700 (PDT), theedudenator

5/8 fire rated drywall is required if there is habitable area above a garage.
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So I am set on standard 1/2" drywall for the entire garage.
Improving the ventilation is to correct the condensation issues. Water is for a sink and brewing beer (there is an existing drain the garage floor - looks like an old toliet drain (from the 1940's) Heater is to heat the garage - while I brew beer or keep wife's car toasty Wood burner is to boil water Attic is for storing X-mas crap Attic has a window Attic has proper ridge vent (new roof) Attic has old improper soffit vents (from 1940's) Attic has a pull down stairs for access Attic has no floor! Garage is 75 feet away from house - separated by driveway.

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theedudenator wrote:

Fix the soffit vents somehow or other. Ridge vent won't do much if there is no way for air to get into the attic.
-- aem sends...
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I agree... just running out of time!!

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