Insulating Internal Garage ceiling.

We have a bedroom which is over a garage and as you can imagine its the coldest room in the house. I was thinking that there ought to bean easy way to insulate this, perhaps with stick on polystyrene on the garage ceiling(100mm thick), the sort of stuff fitted in cavity walls. Is this a practical way of doing it and if so what sort of glue would be needed. Any ideas/suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks
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comp.zrch.embedded wrote:

stick on polystyrene is flammable, and drops burning gobbets down, you definitely dont want it in a garage with petrol etc...
3 inches of kingspan/celotax (from seconds) and then pink fireresistant plasterboard?
but first fill in the draught gaps with expanding foam. [g]
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george [dicegeorge] wrote:

andor more carpet and underlay upstairs (and foam in the gaps)
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Another option if you can take down a strip of ceiling or enough floor is to push the semi-solid fibreglass batts along the ceilings, and then reinstate the ceiling or floor. My parents had this done with a flat roof.
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Our bedroom too is over a garage, and despite several cm of fibreglass in the floor void, thick underlay and carpet, draughtproofing the garage ceiling (actually a side effect of fireproofing it), cavity wall insulation, double glazing (it has 3 large windows) and a decent amount of loft insulation, it's *still* cold in there. Once it gets below freezing, we usually have a 2kW convector heater running on a plug-in thermostat at night (less wasteful & noisy than running the central heating all night) set to 13 deg C, despite having a 13 tog quilt and fluffy 'jamas... :o)
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I would measure all the wall/ceiling temps with an IR thermometer, to discover which one(s) are responsible for the heat loss.
Another problem (common with modern houses) is that there may simply be nothing with any heat capacity inside the insulation.
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I have the same problem with room over garage. Thankfully it's used as a study. Came to the conclusion that in the end it's cheaper and easier to use an oil filled rad to top up the room temp and always be mindful never to buy another house with a room over the garage.
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Davey wrote:

Normally it goes between the rafters, but maybe your roof isn't constructed like that.
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On Fri, 4 Dec 2009 18:06:28 -0000, Davey wrote:

Personally I think that a room over the garage is a great idea .... as long as you've got enough land to put up another garage and then convert the old one into a room - much cheaper than extending :)
SteveW
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I have a bedroom over the garage, and it doesn't get cold. The under floor space is filled to the full joist depth with rockwool. The garage isn't heated but doesn't get fully down to outdoor temperatures. I wouldn't presume that rooms over garages are necessarily cold.
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Our living room and part of the kitchen are over the garage. We had our cavity walls insulated about 20 years ago with blown in rockwool. The guy who quoted said he would do the garage ceiling for a few pounds more and we accepted the offer. They drilled holes between the rafters and blew the wool in. I think it used as much wool as the rest of the house but it made a tremendous difference. When I had to take up part of the kitchen floor a few years later, I found the whole space between the rafters beautifully and completely filled with the wool.
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