Wiring Of A Garrage Door Opener When There Is No Ceiling Outlet ?

Hello:
Friend is moving into a 30 year old house which is a bit shy on electrical outlets.
The previous owner put in an electric garage door opener, but as there is no outlet on the ceiling of the garage for a door opener, he ran an extension cord across the ceiling and half way down a wall to where there is an outlet.
Ceiling and walls in garage are finished, so it would be quite a pain to install an outlet there now.
Realize that installing a ceiling outlet, snaking the wires internally to where they can be spliced in is of course the best way to do it. Will probably end up doing it that way, I guess.
But would like to ask:
What do most folks faced with this "problem" do ? Just this extension cord bit ?
Does this violate any electrical codes ?
Any thoughts on would be appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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The hooligan wrote:

the
you
foot
He can do that provided there is constant 110v at the box. It could be on a switch being it's a light fixture.
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"My garage door opener has been connected to a wall outlet, with an extension cord strung across the ceiling, for 20 years. It does not violate any electrical codes anymore than using an extension cord for anything else."
I would beg to differ. Using an extension cord for a garage door opener is a code violation. Extension cords are intended to be used for temporary connection, not for connecting appliances, motors, etc which are built into the structure. Just because you did it for 20 years doesn't mean it passes code. This is typically red flagged during a home inspection prior to sale.
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I had the very same problem. My garage door openers were installed in 1962. But rather than run an extension cord the owner/builder wired the openers and fluorescent light direct to the ceiling light boxes. If you have ceiling light you can remove the box and put an outlet box up there. One plug can be used for the opener, the other for a 4 or 8 foot fluorescent with attached plug. HTH
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On 2/26/2005 7:09 AM US(ET), Robert11 took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

My garage door opener has been connected to a wall outlet, with an extension cord strung across the ceiling, for 20 years. It does not violate any electrical codes anymore than using an extension cord for anything else.
--
Bill

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What about the fittings for feeding track lighting with a short cord and a 3-pin plug? How come those are legal? Track lighting is usually installed permanently rather than temporarily, isn't it?
Perce
On 02/26/05 11:44 am Richard tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

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willshak wrote:

I think if you look into the electrical code you will find that it is in violation. Extension cord are only intended to be used for temporary connections and may not be used as a substitute for permanent wiring.
Waldo
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replying to Waldo, x Hades Stamps wrote: Not everywhere requires permanent wiring. I DO agree that extension cords are not supposed to be used in that way, but there's nothing else you can really do if your ceiling and walls are finished. It's kind of pricey to install more outlets, even if you do it yourself, which I recommend doing. You would have to pay for new drywall, more electrical pipes, electrical wires (copper price is declining from outrageous, but it's still ridiculous) that are insulated, a ground wire (usually NOT insulated), and the outlets, not to mention you'd have to have someone respray your ceiling on if you have a popcorn ceiling, an electrical box, a brace for the electrical box, and anything I missed. Often, fluorescent light fixtures do not have their own permanent wiring and have to plug DIRECTLY into an outlet connected to the light switch. There IS something that CAN be done, though, and that is to install a longer cord. THAT wouldn't be a violation, WOULD IT? You could cut the end off of an old extension cord and connect it to the screws on the garage door. That would PERMANENTLY connect it, and it would no longer be an extension cord.
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On 09/13/2017 05:44 PM, x Hades Stamps wrote:

Oh good lord!
Cut a 16" x 16" hole (center of stud to center of stud) near the ceiling, drill a 6" access hole in the ceiling, drill a 3/4" hole thru the top plate and run your wires and install receptacle. If you cut the holes carefully, you can reuse the drywall cutouts to fill the holes.
It would take me longer to find my tools than it would to do the actual work.
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Sounds like your garage is like mine - where DID I leave my drywall tools (Haven't used them in YEARS.)
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On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 at 5:44:10 PM UTC-4, x Hades Stamps wrote:

Just stop already. New drywall? electrical pipes? braces? I had to add one in the second bay in my garage. There was a receptacle in the first bay. I had to make one small drywall hole, ran romex from the existing receptacle, it was a small, easy job. Will it always be that easy? No. But without knowing the details of the actual location, you're just throwing a lot of FUD up. And who ever saw a popcorn ceiling in a garage?
Often,

As stated previously, yes it would be a violation.
You could cut the end off of an old extension cord

Screw a cord onto the garage door? Now that's a new one! I think I see some issues there.
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On 2/26/2005 7:32 AM or thereabouts, Mikepier appears, somewhat unbelievably, to have opined:

In that case just leave the switch on. I did this in a previous home and the switch gives an additional security feature. When you go out of town, flip it off. Then thieves with "code-breakers" can't open the door that way.
--
I sent ten puns to all my friends hoping that at least one
would make them laugh.
  Click to see the full signature.
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replying to Dennis Turner, x Hades Stamps wrote:

Sadly, no pun in ten did. Ha ha!
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The extension cord is a violation, although you find them all over. The proper thing to do is snake the outlet and patch the holes

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RBM wrote:

What is the logic for this "violation"? What's the difference whether the wire is in front of or behind the wall?
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Biggest issue is exposure -- the wire is just exposed 24x7, just waiting for someone to damage it.
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replying to RBM, x Hades Stamps wrote: Couldn't you just install a longer cord?
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On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 at 5:44:10 PM UTC-4, x Hades Stamps wrote:

No. It's still a code violation for a number of reasons, including the new one of modifying UL listed eqpt. You can't use flexible unprotected cord fastened to ceilings, walls, etc to power permanently mounted eqpt. In this case it would go across a ceiling and half way down a wall.
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On 9/13/2017 8:49 PM, trader_4 wrote:

When you try to interpret the codes, it all depends on the definitions of "unprotected" (is an outdoor, waterproof extension cord unprotected?), "flexible" (steel girders are flexible; is Romex flexible?), "fastened" (if I screw an eyelet into the ceiling of the garage, attach a one foot length of nylon twine through the eyelet and knot a loop around the "protected" and "inflexible" wire, is that fastened?), and "permanently" (is that more than overnight, a week, a year, a century, a million years?). And, if you sell the property "as is" and the buyer waives an inspection contingency, is it still an illegal sale? Lawyers love real estate disputes! All those billable hours.
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On Thursday, September 14, 2017 at 9:25:50 AM UTC-4, Peter wrote:

You make it sound like this is totally uncharted territory. It's not. Most of those terms are defined in the NEC and this particular issue is very clear. A given AHJ is free to follow or not follow NEC. If the person interested wants to know for sure what their inspector will say, they can go ask.
And, if you sell the property "as

Who said any sale would be illegal?
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