Off Topic - Car Exhaust Tips Needed

Yeah, this is off topic, well not completely because I am REPAIRING my car at HOME.
The flange rusted out on my Chevy engine where the pipe connects to the engine Exhaust manifold. First the flange rusted then the "donut" deteriorated. The pipe goes to the catalytic converter. Both the converter and pipe are still solid. The problem is that in order to get the flange onto the pipe, I must remove the pipe from the cat. converter. The nuts of the clamp came off easily and I removed the clamp. Now comes the problem. What is the best way, or should I say are there any tips or tricks to get the pipe out of the converter without damaging either of them? So far I applied PB Blaster and tried to do some hammering, but nothing moved. The clamp was not on seriously tight so there is not much deformation of the pieces.
However, I know that pounding real hard around the converter will damage the "guts" inside of it. I also dont want to damage that pipe. By theway, the pipe is only a little over a foot long, and is a 90deg. bend.
I have taken apart pipes and mufflers when one or the other is going to be replaced, by chopping out the broken piece, but this is a first. I want to save both, just get it apart to install the flange onto the pipe. Anyone know of any tricks?
Dont bother telling me to replace all the parts. I cant afford them, and I dont replace parts that are still good. I did and still am considering cutting the new flange in half, slipping the halves around the pipe, and welding them back together. That might be my only option, but I thought I'd ask if anyone has any other suggestions first.
(I have a stick welder, but not a cutting torch.)
Note: They do make some hinged type "split flanges", but none for this particular vehicle.
All help appreciated.
Mark
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Exhaust Tools INC does make a tool to seperate the pipes without damaging either....I have two of them....(one for 2 to 2 1/2 inch pipes and the oter for 2 1/12 to 3 inch pipes)...
They work very well and do not damage either pipe...
Unfortunately I believe the cost of the tool(s) would exceed the cost of replacing the parts.... I restore old cars as a hobby and I have a need to remove old exhaust systems enough to justify owning the tools (thats honestly questionable)...
I think you are going to have to bite the bullet, and open your wallet, ....
I do not know if the manufacturer even has a web site...just a small outfit that was selling these tools at a swap meet in Hershey Pa and Carlisle Pa few years ago...
BTW: I hate exhaust work...!
Bob G.
On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 05:05:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

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try rec.autos.tech
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

soak it in solvent oil overnight, dry throughly, apply torch. you can hitch the bend to something solid, like your garage or your house, get the joint hot and heave away. tap with deadblow hammer from time to time.
PITA,
carl
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answers.
2. Having said that- I'd pay the fifty bucks and have a muffler shop do it, up on a lift, with a smoke wrench. Some chores are just so filty miserable and nasty, that it is worth paying for somebody with the right tools who does it every day. The pipe itself is cheap, and even if it seems solid, is likely getting thin, especially in the tight corners.
aem sends...
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