Misleading Amazon price cuts on tools

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I've never learned anything from someone who agreed with me.

Thanks for your response. I think we probably agree, but I may not have made my point clear. Clearly any decision on where to buy a tool or anything, should be based on the total cost to you at the location where you want it and that total cost is not just on the price of the product.
When we consumers consider a purchasing decision, we must weigh Internet purchasing tax-free with shipping and handling and local delivery charges added versus local purchase without shipping and handling to sales tax added. Then we factor in connivance, after sales service and other key but sometimes forgotten charges. Then we can determine the total cost. If we elect not to do these things, then Pogo may have been right when he said, "we have met the enemy and they is us."
The central point you make, that we should all be astute consumers is very valuable. I was afraid that some of the responses were just Amazon/Tool Crib bashing.
Local impact: Our refrigerator is on its way out. We are shopping for a new one. Surprise! The sell price does not include delivery and installation. No dealer has yet told me about those charges until I asked.
Jack
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Thanks for the warning.
For the "life is too short," "buy somewhere else" guys, please try to take a step back, and look at your own advice. If "life is too short," why must consumers have to waste such valuable time *the first time* ferreting out information purposely made as obscure and misleading as possible in order to determine that you should "buy somewhere else" the next time? OK, now we know what Amazon.com is doing. That's one out of how many more to go?
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Many years ago, the FTC really frowned on misleading ads. I worked for Goodyear in one of their Service Stores. In addition to tires and auto service, we also sold electronics and appliances.
The rule then was that to call anything on sale, the price had to be at least 10% lower than the average selling price the previous 30 days. You also had to have on hand enough inventory to cover expected sales. For tires, it was two sets in each size.
Standing rule for store managers: if Sears had an ad for a low ball appliance, go to the Sears store and buy it. They only had one and it was a piece of crap. They really didn't want to sell it. It was just a draw so they could sell you up. It was no big secret though. We had them load it in the Goodyear truck.
We would then place it on our floor to compare the quality of our brand (whatever it was) against Sears. Sears also got a lot of complaints for not having the advertised special in stock.
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