Light won't turn off.

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GET OUT OF THAT HOUSE NOW. IT'S GONNA BURST INTO FLAMES WITHIN THE NEXT FEW SECONDS. LEAVE NOW.........
GO TO A NEIGHBOR AND CALL THE FIRE DEPARTMENT AND AN ELECTRICIAN
LEAVE NOW LEAVE NOW LEAVE NOW
WHY ARE YOU STILL SITTING THERE? GET THE FUCK OUT OF THAT HOUSE.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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trying all wire combinations.. hmmm..
this seems somewhat like using a lighter to see if the gas can is full...
randy

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What you found in your fixture box when you removed the old light was a fixture white and a fixture black spliced on to only 2 of the wires in the wall box.
Inside that wall box there was another splice which had nothing to do with your fixture wires, and for some reason you felt the need to un-do that splice as well.
You are part of the 20% of DIYers and about 10% of so called professionals who suffer from clueless overconfidence and have no business working on whatever it is you're working on. snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
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I cant understand the reason he took all of them apart anyhow. Only TWO wires went to the fixture. There was no reason to disconnect the others.
On 21 Dec 2004 10:16:13 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comjunkbloc (HaHaHa) wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comjunkbloc (HaHaHa) writes:

I would have thought that both percentages would be significantly higher -- though sometimes nowadays given the lack of traditional training and apprenticeship,I don't know which group suffers more from the cruel disease of "clueless overconfidence"
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Too late for you now... It's luck you haven't had a fire yet the way you're blindly hooking up wires.
If you didn't take note of what wires went where when you pulled the old fixture out, and you don't understand how a light switch works, hire a professional.
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The most probable reason that there are two sets of wires is because one set is the hot (power source) and the other set goes to the switch. The black hot wire is connected to the black wire going to (or coming from) the switch. The white switch wire is connected to one side of the fixture---treat and color this wire "black" as it is a hot wire. The white (power source) wire is connected to the other side of the switch. You have to determine which of the two sets of wires is the power source. The bare wires are ground wires and should be connected together and connected to a ground. Having said all that--get help because trial and error is not an acceptable approach to this job MLD

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This post, and also the one from Greg, both look accurate to me. If you are going to take this challenge, then I would first buy some books on home wiring and read all about it before jumping in. If it is too much effort to spend the time to read about it first, then I would take the safe way and get an electrician. For example, if the receptacle has a gold and a silver screw, you need to be sure you are connecting the right wire to the right screw, otherwise you could be setting someone up for electrocution or a fire years later. This opens you up to liability years after a mitake that was part of your learning curve. You should find this exact wiring setup in any beginner book, as this sounds like the most common wiring scheme used for a switched light with power entering the fixture box first. You may recall that when you unscrewed the wires there was a piece of tape, or maybe a black mark with a pen, on one of the white wires, seemingly doing nothing. What that piece of tape says is that this white wire is hot and not neutral, and that it is within a switched circuit. What you did wrong was you bypassed the switch, basically running it in parallel with the light so the switch did nothing. You need it in series with the light, so that it controls the fixture. Draw out your circuit, use a voltage tester and ohmmeter to be sure you understand the circuit, and be very very careful.
Dave

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