Is a woodstove worth the money?

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I'll put it this way: We moved into a home which already had a woodstove. I love it. However, I don't love it enough for me to buy it.
Michael
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

company. Compared to friends and family my heating costs are significantly less. But most of all my interior temp is much nicer. To achive my average temps their bills would be out of sight.
Perhaps one of the hidden secrets is where and when to buy your wood. I get mine in April or May for use in the next season. Around here that represents a minimum 20% discount as the suppliers need business. Ideal for me as that means I know seasoning of the wood is at least 6 months when I activate the fires.
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adding the wood to the stove. So unless you are getting free wood I suggest a wood pellet stove or corn stove as a much better alternative (you only have to fill them once a day or so). Corn stoves are appealing in the rural midwest, but are less appealing in big cities where is may be more difficult to get corn cheaply.
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Yeah, but say I get trapped with no electricity and all my pellets run out. Then I can't use wood. I can't get to the store to get the pellets. I'm doomed. I know that silly and I am exagerrating, but I don't know that I want to have to keep buying pellets from the store. I don't know what that sounds so bad to me compared to good old fashioned wood.
Do the pellets get the stove hot enough so I could cook on top of it (with a pan)?
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So buy either a pellet stove that does not need electric feed (and buy enough pellets to last the whole season) or buy a pellet stove that can safely burn wood (and cut some wood two years before you plan to burn it.)

Any stove that gets too hot to touch is OK for cooking -- not necesarily in an open frying pan, but you can slow cook stews, soups etc. (as we did for 8 days during the 1999 ice storm in eastern Canada.)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

pellets won't run out in most pellet stoves requires electricity for the blower and the pellet mover.
So buy a regular wood stove! No electricity involved. And they don't cost anywhere near $2000 unless you are a Yuppie. But they do require some work.
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