Instant Cooling to 35deg.F

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I agree with you that a spinning can in an ice water bath will cool faster than a spinning can in a container of cubes with no water, but you wrote

which is incorrect. Water has a 0.596 W/mC conductance, vs 2.26 for ice.
It's fun to watch you wriggle when you're wrong :-)
Nick
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wrote:

I'll plead guilty to imprecise use of terminology, at least. Water is a far more efficient heat-transfer agent than ice, partly due its greater specific heat, but largely due to its ability to remove heat by convection. You're right that the thermal conductivity of ice is greater than that of water, but that's not all there is to the story -- and I think you know that.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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But the icewater bath temp hardly changes...
Nick
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wrote:

Right, until the ice melts. And that's why you use salt when making homemade ice cream: to enable you to have icewater at a temperature lower than zero C.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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An Ice/water mixture at 32deg F is probably better than just ICE alone at 32 deg F.
But..
Ice alone could be at -20 deg F or any other colder temperature.
Then the answer is not so obvious...
Ice/water at 32 or ice at -20?
Mark
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Mark wrote:

Ice by itself will in all likelihood be worse than the ice/water mixture because can't easily get full contact w/ the container so the effective heat transfer rate will be less for it than for the water. My gut feeling is still w/ the water. But, of course, w/ the brine solution you can approach 0F w/ salt and get the advantages of both the full contact/good heat transfer and colder temperature than the melting ice to boot...
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Mark wrote:

Depends. How many square inches of contact surface? I bet 100 square inches of 32F water will cool to 35F faster than 3 square inches of -20F ice. Especially so if the ice forms a skin of water between ice and beer can, limiting the interface temperature to 32F.
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On Aug 30, 9:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) often writes.: .

. Doug: That reference to the Boston Tea party, which in turn led to American Independence, always amuses! . But even more amusing was an occasion (in the eraly 1960s) when myself, an ex Brit. had to explain to a good friend and neighbour at that time, an American serviceman (Tech. Sgt.) of Mexican extraction, the significance to American history of the Boston Tea Party! . His wife though was from Massachusetts or Maine (somewhere in New England) and one would have thought she would have explained it!
Regards. Terry
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On Aug 29, 10:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@hot-o-mail.com wrote:

Dry ice (frozen co2).
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On Aug 29, 11:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@hot-o-mail.com wrote:

http://kwc.org/blog/archives/2005/2005-05-09.mythbusters_cooling_a_sixpack_ancient_battery_and_rebuilding_buster_extended_edition.html
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On Aug 29, 10:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@hot-o-mail.com wrote:

Or pretend you're in England and drink warm beer.
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Heh. I shipped to Germany in 1962. All local bars served warm beer - very good beer.
Shipped again in 1968 - many local, GI patronized bars now had chilled beer. The guys like me who had been there before always had the beer warmed (little electric heaters they stuck in the mug).
Then there was the NCO club. They served german beer but were required to push American. Became automatic to order a German brew and recieve an American with it which promptly got poured out.
Harry K
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I worked with Siemens in 1975. In Munich, they cooled beer in the chilled air ducts of their large computers.
Nick
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On Aug 30, 4:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

I worked with a large telephone equipment manufacturing company in the late 1950s. Electro-mechanical telephone equipment then worked on large quantities of 48 volts DC. Many of the technicians tools included a little resistor that could be wired up to the 48 volts to hang into and quickly heat one single mug of water to make tea. The resistors, which were usually stained dark brown from the teal leaves used (few tea bags then) didn't burn out because the excess heat well above their, in air rating, boiled the water! Didn't take long for a one or two unnoticed amps at 48 volts to boil one cup of water. Watts = Volts (48) times amps (2) = 96 watts. As much almost as a 100 watt light bulb!
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Our bank coin handers were made in Stuttgart. The workers set their dark beer in the sunny windows so it would be warm for lunch.
They also chuckled at our "Pilsner" beers.
-larry / dallas
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The OP just has to learn to hit the bottle just right. Liquid to ice in a few seconds. http://video.google.com/videoplay?docidS30299656943225595&q er+freezing&total7&start=0&numP&so=0&type=search&plindex=0
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Kitep wrote:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docidS30299656943225595&q er+freezing&total7&start=0&numP&so=0&type=search&plindex=0
that's called a "supercooled liquid" - you can actually cool a liquid below its freezing point if it is very, very still - but jostle it a little bit and it will immediately undergo a phase transformation.
I wouldn't recommend that video for a high school physics class though :)
nate
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snipped-for-privacy@hot-o-mail.com wrote:

Beer is easy. Don't worry about chilling it en route to your camp spot. Worry about will it warm up enough to drink when you get there.
Favorite white water rafting and desert camping trick. Works with canned beer only. Freeze the beer rock solid for two three days. It isn't hard to find room in a separate freezer to freeze 6 or 12. Beer freezes at a very low temperature, about 2 degrees fahrenheit. Once frozen it'll store forever in the freezer.
Does not work with non alcholic stuff. Non alcoholic stuff freezes at too high a temperature.
Use the frozen beer to keep the food in the cooler cold. Haul out a couple when you arrive so they defrost in time to drink.
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