Installing vinyl siding in the winter

I live in the Northeast and am considering having my house vinyl sided. Do installers routinely do this sort of work year round or is it necessary to wait for warmer weather?
If installation in the winter is commonplace, are there any drawbacks to having the work done at that time of year?
The existing siding must be removed if that is a factor in determining whether the work can be done in the winter.
Thanks, Rich
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Rich wrote:

They build homes all year long, don't they. Yea it's done all year long. If they know what they are doing it should not be a problem, if they don't know what they are doing, waiting until summer is not going to help.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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The house two doors from me was sided on a day that was -4. The once across from e was sided in +15.

Yes, you freeze your ass off.
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Rich wrote:

Only two things that I can think of. 1. The plastic will be stiffer in cold weather and will not bend as freely as it does in warm weather. Not so much that the siding will crack, but it is a little more difficult to bend the siding to fit into J-channel and into the corner post channel, especially in tight spaces. 2. When cutting cold siding to length, it is imperative to take into account that the cold siding is probably at its most contracted state, and it will expand when it gets warm, so the allowance for expansion must be strictly adhered to. If it is not allowed for, the siding will be rippled when it gets warm. FWIW, vinyl siding is not nailed firmly to the sheathing, it is hung from roofing type nails which are driven into the center of the slots provided, leaving a gap between the nail head and sheathing to allow for lateral movement for expansion and contraction. If you have ever seen vinyl siding that is rippled, it is because someone nailed it tightly instead of hanging it. I have to look at the ripples in my neighbor's vinyl siding every summer because someone nailed it solidly. It goes away in the winter though, when the siding contracts. An experienced sider will know all this and will probably only take his personal comfort into account as to whether he wants to hang siding in cold weather.

Just personal comfort.
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Thank you for the information, this is helpful.
willshak wrote:

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Before having the vinyl installed, I need to have the existing hardboard siding removed. I have a couple of sections ~ 4x2 where water has gotten behind the siding and has damaged the OSB sheathing. Do vinyl installers typically do these repairs or is this something I have to sub out to someone else?
Thanks again.
willshak wrote:

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Some will, some won't. Be sure to ask ahead as you don't want to hold up the siding guys while you find a carpenter.
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Rich wrote:

When you have the guy come out to give you an estimate, tell him about any repairs that you know about and might have to be made. He can then bring the repair material when he comes to install the vinyl, rather than him having to stop in the middle of the job to go get some. Here's something else you might consider. When I had my siding installed, I opted for an underlayment, which was 3/8" thick polystyrene boards with aluminum foil on front and back. Just for a little more heat and sound insulation. It wasn't a whole lot more added to the cost. My house is very quite. I can't even hear cars or trucks pulling up in my driveway. I see the oil or propane delivery guy walk by my window dragging a hose and never heard the truck pull up.

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I've seen a foam product that some installations use to smooth out the wall and to provide at least a little insulation, both sound and temperature. I thought this was something that I would like to have. I would think that I still need to have the OSB repaired to provide a good nailing surface. I figured that since the board is exposed anyway it would be good to do the repair.
Thanks!
willshak wrote:

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Rich wrote:

I hope you have OSB and not that fiberboard crap like another neighbor of mine whose house was built about 35 years ago by one of those mass-producing, common bi-level (split foyer), home builders. He has asbestos shingle siding over the fiberboard and the nails keep popping out. There is no way to pound them back in where they will stay. As a matter of fact, they can almost be pushed back in with a thumb. That stuff is more suited to be used as a bulletin board. My custom built, one-off, house has plywood sheathing (built in 1984). Definitely easier to make repairs when the siding is off, rather than after it is resided. :-)

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The house is 12 years old and it's definitely OSB. Thank goodness it's not fiberboard!
Thanks again.
willshak wrote:

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"Rich" wrote

Around here, fastening must be done every 16" and into a stud. Just hanging into the OSB or plywood is a big no-no. Even old homes with 1"x material, the siding fasteners must hit a stud every 16". Our area requires 16" OC wall studs, and not 24" OC like some areas.
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Thanks, I didn't realize that.
Rivers wrote:

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"Rich" wrote

If the contractor hasn't told you already. Make sure to remove all pictures/knick-knacks/clocks etc. from the perimeter walls. Otherwise, you may possibly find things broken from hitting the floor.
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