How do you drill through stainless steel at home?

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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 19:49:02 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"
Ever notice my domain name? The Cal Poly motto is "Learn by Doing" (Discere Faciendo). I didn't quite get the translation from Latin correct and ended up with "Learn By Destroying". It was appropriate Destruction and resurrection form a great learning experience. At the time, I think I held the record for maximum damage in a single semester. At graduation time, the faculty committee could not decide if they should require that I hang around another year as punishment for past indiscretions, or to summarily graduate me in order to get rid of me.
Working in electronics was somewhat less destructive mostly because I decided that actually thinking before I did something was a good idea.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Yes, and I've visited the site. Did you notice the emoticon that said I was joking with you?

At one job I had to take freshly minted techs and engineering students to try to turn them into usable employees. One engineering student started a fire by laying a hot soldering iron on a pile of paper towels, then he stood there screaming "Run for your lives, we're all gona die" He was standing in front of the fire extinguisher, so I grabbed the pile of flaming towels and ran out the front door to let them burn out in the parking lot. He had been shown where every extinguisher was, and there were squeeze bottles full of window cleaner that would have put it out. The last I heard of him was that he was working for RCA designing TV tuners.. I was glad that I was out of the TV repair business!
Another destroyed transistors by the handful buy putting them in wrong, then laughing about it. The last I heard, he workes at WPAFB in one of the labs. He was at R.L. Drake, till they got out of the ham radio business.
They were the cream of the crop. :(
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Were they affirmative action hires?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
At one job I had to take freshly minted techs and engineering students to try to turn them into usable employees. One engineering student started a fire by laying a hot soldering iron on a pile of paper towels, then he stood there screaming "Run for your lives, we're all gona die" He was standing in front of the fire extinguisher, so I grabbed the pile of flaming towels and ran out the front door to let them burn out in the parking lot. He had been shown where every extinguisher was, and there were squeeze bottles full of window cleaner that would have put it out. The last I heard of him was that he was working for RCA designing TV tuners.. I was glad that I was out of the TV repair business!
Another destroyed transistors by the handful buy putting them in wrong, then laughing about it. The last I heard, he workes at WPAFB in one of the labs. He was at R.L. Drake, till they got out of the ham radio business.
They were the cream of the crop. :(
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

No. It was a small electronics business, where the owner would hire people with little or no experience because they would work cheap. They were about a third of the employees, and were given the simplest jobs to start with. A lot had taken the Electronics course at a local vocational school.
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Good morning Mr. Young. Just thought I'd let you know this mean spirited posting finally got to me and you are back on ignore.
Learn more about Jesus indeed. I think I've learned enough.
--
Dan Espen

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Oh, that's got to hurt. my posts won't appear on one computer, in one building, in one town? I'm going to cry all night.
Did you ask if I was being mean spirited? No..... just made your own conclusions.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
writes:

Good morning Mr. Young. Just thought I'd let you know this mean spirited posting finally got to me and you are back on ignore.
Learn more about Jesus indeed. I think I've learned enough.
--
Dan Espen



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On Sat, 09 Mar 2013 00:08:18 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

I don't maintain it any more. I'm just below my maximum quota. I should move the DNS record to point to: <http://802.11junk.com which I also don't maintain much because it's such a disorganized mess. Oh well.

Nope. I usually ignore imbedded hieroglyphics.

Sounds like me about 45 years ago. One of the other techs had started a small fire on the workbench with a hot soldering iron. I arrived to save the day by unloading 10 lbs of Class D dry powder from a large fire extinguisher into the flames, and all over everything in the shop. One big "whoosh" and the extinguisher was empty. It took about a week to clean up the mess.
I was on the receiving end of another brain dead fire extinguisher operator. I was working on a Rose Float at the college when sparks from a welder set fire to a small pile of oily rags and rubbish. We were all standing around the impromptu bon fire (it was a cold night) when someone arrived with a CO2 fire extinguisher. Standing on the opposite side of the fire from me, they unloaded the extinguisher, which blew considerable burning debris in my direction. I was able to get out of the way of this crud flame thrower just in time.
Some things just have to be learned the hard way.

Careful, those that can't do anything useful on the bench, eventually become managers.

At graduation, we attempted to guess the future profession and level of success of various notable engineering graduates. It was generally agreed that I would die in a spectacular explosion of my own creation.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Jeff Liebermann wrote:

My incident was about 40 years ago.

Still better than fighting a forest fire with nothing but a backpak water tank, and a shovel. :)

He's probaly laid off right now. He was told that the fiscal cliff 'Sequester" would cut the funding for the contactor he works for.

It IS nice to be rcognized for your talents. It's a good thing you didn't work at a munitions plant, instead of Lingerie. How many people have been killed by an exploding corset? :)
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On Sat, 09 Mar 2013 14:43:04 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

Been there, done that, but only once. I think it was about 1966. I was doing something useless in a Cal Poly Pomona dormitory, when someone from the state forestry service arrived asking for volunteers to fight a fire. This was in the days when it was fashionable to empty the colleges, instead of the jails, to fight forest fires. We were soon on our way to do battle with a brush fire burning in the bottom of the San Gabriel River (now known as the 605 freeway) near El Monte. It's not every day that a dry river catches fire, and I wanted to be part of the experience. Our job was mostly to haul cut brush away from the river banks, so the adjacent houses would not burn. The bulldozers just couldn't work among the rubble on the river bottom. There were no fatalities or major injuries. We did loose a few due to exhaustion from being out of shape and not drinking enough water. We were at it for about 12 hrs, with erratic breaks, until another motley load of student arrived to relieve us.

True. I haven't worked much with explosives, but I came close. Pollack-Benedict(?) construction was building the Simi Valley freeway between the north end of the San Fernando Valley and Simi Valley. The connecting pass was plagued with large granite boulders, typically about the size of a large 2 story house. This was too much for the earth movers, so blasting contractor was hired to break them apart. Everyone assumed that during blasting, that the 2 lane highway, next to where the freeway was being built, could be closed to traffic. Nope. In provide the illusion of safety, some traffic control was needed. What better use for expendable students.
A desperate call was made to San Fernando Valley State College (now known as Cal State University, Northridge) for anyone with RF experience. Of course all the ham radio operators immediately responded. 4 of us were hired to direct traffic, but more importantly, to yell at anyone with a 2-way radio in their vehicle to turn it off or risk having their transmitter cause a premature explosion. Signs highlighting the danger of radio transmissions in the area were installed at key locations, and generally ignored. It seemed that the local public service, public safety, and VIP drivers didn't really like the idea of driving for about 20 minutes without their radio. I had to settle for having them unscrew their microphones or promise not to transmit until clear of the area. There were no explosions, but I was genuinely concerned. Many years later, I discovered that a radio was unlikely to cause a blasting cap to explode, but at the time, it was generally accepted that it was possible.

I have no idea. Googling for "exploding corset" yields only one possibility: <http://www.lelong.com.my/kx/corset+exploding.htm
My father's factory (Tosca Lingerie) did not make corsets. It made womens night wear, commonly known as lingerie. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingerie>
However, I did work for a company that made corsets, which were designed to contain an exploding waistline. I got a summer job in shipping and receiving at Foundation Garments in Smog Angeles. The bulk of their sales were male girdles offered for sale in the military PX stores. At the time, the military was downsizing well after the Korean War, and was using every excuse possible to retire overweight and out of shape officers. The only quick solution was to redistribute the flab with a male girdle. My employment was uneventful, although I did obtain a new proficiency with profanity, that has remained with me to this day.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Mine was on the Ft. Greely reserve, in the Buffalo Drop zone. I had just finished 40 hours on duty in two days when I was dragged out of bed and told I had volunteered to fight a fire cased by two idiot officers who shot at a rabbit whit a M16, and hit the rock it was sitting on. It ricochet and hit the gas tank on the tactilely equipped jeep they had taken from the motor pool and it exploded. Hundreds of acres of heavy forest were on fire, and we were to dig a fire break by hand. They lost the tanker in heavy smoke, and had to bring another truckload of water. A helicopter was dropping water on the flames, but the smoke was so thick you could only see about eight feet most of the time.

I saw a lot of those signs when we made a trip to Florida in '66. They were building I-75, and very few sections were open for any real distance. A lot of time was spent on US 27 and various old roads to get from one section to the next. Often we were diverted from open sections because of blasting.
OTOH, and uncle owned a huge quarry in Kentucky, and they had several blasters on their staff to blow away the sides of the cliffs into the quarry. He sold the crushed rock to the state to build the interstate system in Kentucky.

No corsets in the PX, but the one on Alaska sold tights with a fly as lightweight thermal underwear in cotton & Nylon. The box had a drawing of a postman in shorts wearing them. When it was below -40, you wore them with the regular thermals to keep from losing your legs to frostbite. The damn things had a seam up the insides of the legs that could rub you raw. I figured out really fast why the nylon (without the seams) was never in stock. :(
They gave some guys 90 days to lose up to 50 pounds in '74. No healthy way to do that, in such as short time frame. One of the 'broadcasters' (AKA: A 'Talking Head'/DJ) got written orders to lose weight, or take a dishonorable discharge.
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It wasn't managed by a man named Scarpia, was it?
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On Sun, 10 Mar 2013 04:13:57 -0700, "William Sommerwerck"

No. My father (Maurice Liebermann) and his partner (Israel Drier) ran the factory. There was no general manager. When the business was sold in about 1987, it was purchased by Dave (I forgot his last name), who hired his son in law, Jim Greenspan, as general manager. At its height, in about 1985, we had about 100 employees scattered among 3 buildings. There's currently a retail store at the same location, that has recycled the name as "Tosca Lingerie II".
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 17:08:39 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Want one? I run across at least 1 a year. I sent one off last year to be scrapped. Ran fine, nobody wanted it.
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On 3/7/2013 3:46 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Ya know, I just remembered that I used my Dremel Tool to make a hole in some extremely hard metal on one occasion. I used a little carbide ball bit and it worked quite well but wasn't as fast as drilling. ^_^
TDD
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 11:27:57 -0600, The Daring Dufas wrote:

I have one of those! I've never used it (it came with the bits). I'll see if it works.
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On 3/8/2013 11:45 AM, Danny D. wrote:

I had to get out a broken grade8 stud that was below the surface of the block on a generator engine and the Dremel Tool made a hole for a screw extractor. A drill bit wouldn't work. ^_^
TDD
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On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 21:46:00 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I know you like that thing. So put it in the kitchen. Hang this on the BBQ. http://www.webstaurantstore.com/5-church-key-can-and-bottle-opener/407C801.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term@7C801&utm_campaign=PLA&gclid=CPLM05b_7bUCFY9AMgodQz4ALg Don't mean to be a SS drilling party-pooper. but hey.
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 14:52:24 -0600, Vic Smith wrote:

Interesting, they call it a "Church Key".
I have an old (way way way old) one, Ballantine stamped on it, stored somewhere in the garage.
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On 3/7/2013 3:46 PM, Danny D. wrote:

I had a thought that if you're wanting to attach a chain to it and it has a hollow handle, you could use an expanding concrete anchor and a bolt with Loctite 262 to keep the bolt/screw from coming out. ^_^
TDD
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s.

Plus, start with a small drill and work progressively upwards to the size you want.
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