How do you create a PDF by copying a page in an HP printer/copier?

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Brent wrote:

Works for me

///Peter
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 20:31:37 +0000, Peter Flynn wrote:

Thanks Peter.
I found out the LaserJet 3200 TWAIN drivers are NOT on the HP web site http://www.hp.com/support/lj3200 :(
Turns out someone posted the entire HP 271Mb CDROM as a zip file here: :) http://forums13.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/questionanswer.do?admit 9447627+1266179829676+28353475&threadId•0340
A few of those HP CDROM links and torrernts didn't work but this one worked on the 3rd try: http://s197185871.onlinehome.us/hpdownloads/
So now I have the HPLJ3200 "TWAIN" drivers installed (these files were from 2000 which predates my printer mfg date of 2001 though).
The hp laser jet 3200m printer is still not scanning to PDF (yet) but at least the printer is recognized as a scanner (which it wasn't before).
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 21:47:05 +0000, Brent wrote:

imagemagick will quickly and easily convert most image files to pdf.
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Brent wrote:

Twain driver is probably in Windows....I can't imagine how it interacts with your printer (or mine:o) but if you install old software, like your printer, you might need to make sure WinXP is up to date. From the list above, my GUESS would be the xp communication patch. On one of the pages I posted links to, there is the option to let HP look at your puter to see what it needs. I would definitely try that.
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On Sun, 14 Feb 2010 17:32:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I did try that yesterday. And failed.
1. In Firefox 3.6, on WinXP SP3, I started at the HP driver page for the Laser Jet 3200m http://tinyurl.com/yd9qpm5
2. I pressed the HP link titled "Automatically check to see if your driver needs updating (MS windows only)" http://www.hp.com/cpso-support-new/SDD/index.htm?lang=en&cc=us
3. On Firefox 3.6, this reported the error: HP Instant Support - Driver Check Unsupported Operating System or Browser Currently HP Instant Support - Driver Check supports only Windows 2000, Windows XP, and later systems running Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) 5.0 and above.
4. On IE 8.0, this also failed with no errors reported (just a blank page).
End result: Nice idea of HP to check for outdated drivers - but bad implementation. And, even so, there's great doubt HP would update the TWAIN drivers (which is what we need to enable the HP LaserJet 3200 m scanner).
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Look, you've already been told the site is down. Now, you're a troll with all your excuses. Go to a "help" group and bother them. Take the Home repair group off your cross post. p.s. fuck off.
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Stepfann King wrote:

The site isn't down. If you don't like the thread, don't read it.
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You can fuck off,too.
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 02:48:33 +0000, Stepfann King wrote:

boy. you sound sssooooooooooooo manly! OOOOOOOooooooooooooooooooooooooo! can you make a pdf document, too?
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On Sun, 14 Feb 2010 20:03:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Hi Norminn,
Thanks for your help. I think I've found the answer (finally).
2:38:36 PM (and others), that the HP driver site isn't down (as you noted).
If the solution were that simple, I'd just go to the local library and download the required TWAIN drivers for the HP LJ3200m LaserJet scanner and be done with it.
2/14/2010 at 8:48:06 PM showed a more sinister problem.
HP apparently doesn't supply the TWAIN drivers needed for the HP LJ 3200m scanner on their freeware web page.
The only known solutions for the HP LJ 3200m are the following: a) Find the original CDROM that came with the HP LJ 3200m in 2001 b) Order from HP the WinXP replacement CDROM TWAIN drivers (at some cost) c) Find where someone has kindly made the CDROM available for download
I'm currently working on option (c) above and I think I will be able to report success in an hour or so (the HP TWAIN driver CDROM is reputedly 500 MBytes).
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 06:31:07 +0000 (UTC), Brent wrote:

To report back to the team, the TWAIN drivers are definitely not on the HP support pages: http://www.hp.com/support/lj3200
Warren Block confirmed that in this URL: http://forums11.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/questionanswer.do?admit 9447626+1266270241277+28353475&threadId•0340
Most of the links in that URL were dead but this one worked on the 3rd try: http://s197185871.onlinehome.us/hpdownloads /
The software is huge and OLD (it predates the printer mfg date) but once I installed the 271 Mbytes, it added something called "HP LaserJet Device Configuration", and "Scandrivers and Copier Software", and "Screen Fonts", and "Readiris Pro 6.0 OCR Application", etc.
Now Scan2PDF recognizes the printer as a scanner.
I still haven't gotten the setup to scan to PDF but now the problem is muuuuuch simpler. It's just to find which freeware to use to scan a document to PDF (which was the original question).
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Brent wrote:

http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/DriverDownload.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&prodNameId (035&taskId5&prodTypeId972&prodSeriesId$354&lang=en&cc=us&submit=Go%20%BB
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/SoftwareIndex.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&prodNameId (035&prodTypeId972&prodSeriesId$354&swLang=8&taskId5&swEnvOID"8 Why not use the install disk that came with the printer?
///Peter
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Peter Flynn wrote: (snip)

He can't find it. BTDT, usually on a second-hand printer, or because the idiot contractors that support us at work throw out any CDs that haven't been used in a couple of years, and only keep one set of disks for each flavor of printer. (Install 50 printers just alike, keep one set of disks, throw the rest away. I always look in the dumpsters when I pass them, and my CYA collection has saved the day more than once.)
-- aem sends...
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 15:42:43 -0500, aemeijers wrote:

I don't know what BTDT means but thanks for clarifying.
Yes, I lost the original HP TWAIN driver CDROM after changing PCs and moving a couple of times.
While "printer" drivers are easy to find, I thought (like others did) that HP "scanner" drivers could just as easily be downloaded from the HP web site http://www.hp.com/support/lj3200
Sad to say, there are NO TWAIN drivers for the scanner on HP's web site!
From the Warren Block pointer, I finally found a posted huge 271 MB zip file of the ancient HP CDROM on the Internet (dated 2000 whereas I bought my laserjet for $650 new back in 2001).
It's still not scanning to PDF but at least the scan2pdf freeware application is recognizing the scanner! (success almost at last)
Note to self: If I had known that it was nearly impossible to find HP scanner drivers, I would have archived the CDROM in a safety deposit box at the bank!
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 20:29:02 +0000, Peter Flynn wrote:

I would if I could find them. I bought the HP LaserJet 3200m printer/scanner in 2001 for over $650 (which was a lot in those days for a B&W printer).
I've moved twice since then; and changed computers multiple times; and, well, if I knew then that it was nearly impossible to find the TWAIN drivers for the computer, I'd have put the original CDROM in a safety deposit box or something.
Whew! I can't believe how hard it was to find basic HP scanner drivers!
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Brent wrote:

There are a lot of dusty old pack rats on the web - I don't believe any software is impossible to find. Could probably find the OS for my hubby's Commodore 64 :o) I think he said it has 3k of memory :o)
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 19:37:00 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

The 20K OS was burnt into ROM on the C-64. The 64 in the name referred to the 64K of available RAM, though only 38K of it was available for BASIC programming. Though you can find the OS and many C-64 emulators online today
The Bally Arcade sold in 1977-78 with the drop in BASIC cartridge had 2K of RAM and 2K of ROM. It preceded the C-64 by a couple years. You'd be surprised what you can author in only 2K of RAM if you are creative enough. When I see what bloatware-programmers can't even implement in 2M today I have a good laugh at them. I had a few games and utilities published for the Bally Arcade. My favorite being one called "A-Mazed in Space". That one was the ultimate programming discipline to fit it all in only 2K of RAM while written in BASIC, not one byte wasted. It would construct a new random maze of any complexity or dimensions from user input. Then you had to fly up to 4, player controlled, 8-direction-retrorocket spacecrafts through it in zero-gravity without hitting another's spacecraft or wall, or it would blow up your spacecraft and send you back to the start. Complete with all the bells and whistles of colors, sound effects, and warning text displayed while playing.
Programming on the Bally Arcade was a fun challenge in the use of 4 color "shift" keys on a 24-keypad so the 20 other keys would have full alpha-numeric and BASIC command input. They implemented the first use of saving and loading your programming to an audio-cassette recorder through the use of a modem. I sill have mine. A method that Commodore adopted later for their C-16 and C-64.
I was hopeful that Bally would have pursued their next phase of computer with the Zgrass programming language in it, the very same graphics programming that was used to create the special effects in the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey", but unfortunately the mucky-mucks at Bally put their money into gyms instead of computers and their next computer was never realized. I was forced to move to Commodore. I think I still have the pre-order form in my "collectibles" cabinet, in anticipation for when it was going to be manufactured and released but never was. I suspect the CEOs of Bally are probably kicking themselves today with every step on their stair-masters in their temples of self-worship. Though that too was a good financial move it was nowhere near to what they could have been sitting on today had they developed their computer line instead. Jocks are never very intelligent. The phrase "dumb jock" was epitomized by the CEOs of Bally.
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wrote:
[snip]

The previous machine, the Commodore VIC-20 (The worlds first color computer for under $300) came with 5K RAM (3.5K available for BASIC programs). There was an additional 1K*4 bit RAM for color. It was possible to add 24K additional RAM using a plug-in cartridge (plus another 3K and 8K, but the screen makes it non-contiguous)

I wrote a BASIC expansion (called BASIC PLUS) for the C-64, which was designed to fit into the lo cartridge address space ($8000-$9FFF). I really got a lot into that 8K. I added a version for the C-128 too.
BTW, these Commodore machines had very slow disk drives. A 1200BPS modem was faster.
[snip]
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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wrote:

Right after I hit send, I remembered the VIC. =) I ran into them when I was fixing friend's computers that wanted me to add in the extra SID chip to their C-64's for stereo.

I vaguely recall using that. =)
HEX editing printer drivers was my main ML coding at the time, trying to get obscure printers to work with the C-64/128's at the highest resolutions possible. My earliest full-color printer with the CMYK ink bands on the ribbon was a real challenge to get it to work in GEOS. It finally produced some fairly decent images at something like 280dpi. Quite the feat for what is originally a 72dpi platform. I had built an NTSC to GIF converter board and wanted to print some of those captures from my VHS-recorder and VHS video camera. The days before they contained the tape within the camera itself. =)
The C-128 with the RAM expansion pack, still hooked up in the basement with the GEOS operating systems on it, was my first taste of CP/M. When I later migrated into DOS I realized there was some major Gate's thievery going on. There was virtually no difference between the two. My previous CP/M experience making the move totally painless. About the only difference being that .COM and .BAT files were named by different extensions, which I forget at the moment.

A whopping 168k on a single-sided 5.25" floppy! At the allotted 1-2 hour a day access to BBS's it would take a good 3-7 days to download a new game or application to fill a 168k floppy. The days when shareware actually meant SHAREware. Today it's been renamed to freeware after the greedy and self-serving usurped the title of community shareware. My box of 8" 168k floppies in storage is even more fun to look at. There's also an interesting 150 baud modem in that storage pile. It weighs about 30-40 lbs., the size of a medium suitcase. You have to hardwire the phone line, no modular plugs back then.
Interesting (to me) I found I can type faster than 300 baud modems. Chats were highly annoying. Did you ever lose connection on a P2P file transfer in Punter protocol and had to resume it by one party typing GOOGOOGOO... real fast and the other typing ACKACKACK... ? ("go" and "acknowledge") Those were the days ... =)
The more interesting thing about these old "slow" machines is that they weren't all that slow at the time. Programmers had the discipline to tighten up their code, making every byte count within those limited memory constraints. I attribute the eventual move from 1MHz to 3.4GHz CPUs being caused by really sloppy programmers and those that got paid by how many lines of code as opposed to functionality--bloatware. They wondered why their programs ran so slow, always blaming the CPU speed instead of their own terrible programming skills. By using some creative thinking I found a way to scan all 4 game-controllers' switches and pots in that Bally Pro Arcade with only 3 short lines of BASIC for a 4-player "Simon" game I wrote. Those 3 lines becoming a real assist for any later BASIC programs. Run Windows 3.1 on a present PC machine sometime. Be amazed at the blinding speed at which it operates.
This off-topic got me interested in searching out emulators for these old machines. I found a program called MESS at .org. Then on rapidshare I found a pack of 631 gaming-machine and early computer ROM images to plug into it. Everything from my first gamer the Odyssey II with PONG (1974-75? still have it), to Gameboys, Playstations, Kaypros, early Macs, TI's, and C-128's, etc. It'll be a fun walk through nostalgia-land.
I'm glad someone brought this up. This was a good "net-suck".
[Net-suck: n. Minding your own business on the net and you see some obscure thing that triggers a memory and you are sucked into the net into a remote and distant place that had absolutely nothing to do with what you had intended on accomplishing. The original reason for surfing now just an obscure memory. Usage: (usually derogatory) "Well there goes 7 hours of my life I'll never get back, all thanks to that nasty net-suck."]
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** COMMODORE 64 BASIC V 2.0 ** 64 K RAM SYSTEM 38911 BASIC BYTES FREE READY :-) Spend most of my adolesence (my free time, obviously) on my best friend's c-64. There were also manu Cold War inspired games (Raid over Moscow was one).
--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering
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