How did the burglars enter?

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Home Guy wrote:

Best way around that in homes with children is to get a small safe that is opened by biometrics, or a code you can easily peck-out in complete darkness.
Keypad version ~ $80 http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=pistol+safes \&hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw80&bihi9&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid267193382706115429&sa=X&ei¿B_T-jrIIiG8QTsr4nPBw&ved JIBEPMCMAA
or: http://preview.tinyurl.com/keypad-gun-safe
Fingerprint reader version, about $200 (Amazon.com product link shortened)
--
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This morning I made 12, I was prolific. -Mitch Hedberg
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He was in there a while.....and made a video!!!
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.

or force it closed to cause the bar to bend up like that?
Mark
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On 4/5/2012 10:19 PM, Mark wrote:

Interesting question. If the window was fully opened, then pushing it closed could force the bar to bend up, as that is what keeps the window in place. Again, why bother? The window was opened when I arrived home.
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wrote:

If you had the window unlatched and opened a crack, that could be forced open with damaging the frame. Would that do the bend? I don't know, but you can figure that out. No way it could be forced without frame damage if it was latched. Can't tell the distance to the ground, or if the burglar needed a boost up. More likely you went away for the night with the window cracked open than leaving doors unlocked - seems to me. Doesn't make much difference how they got in if they did it so easily. What would concern me is how the burglar knew you were away. Might seem paranoid, but that's what I would be thinking about.
--Vic
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<stuff snipped>

I've been told by cops that a majority of these types of burglars are committed by "neighbors" or friends of neighbors. They have an excuse to be loitering around and they can tell when you're not home pretty easily. When we had a rash of car break-ins, it was the junkie son of a elderly couple living across the street that had come home to live with them. And burglarize the neighbors for spending money.
-- Bobby G.
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On 4/5/2012 11:03 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

The bottom of the bay window is 39 inches above the soil.

That's the consensus among my friends. Odd thing was that I was away for almost three weeks, returned on a Thursday, and everything okay. Three days later, a Sunday night/Monday morning, I was away overnight for 14 hours when it happened.
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<stuff snipped>

It could likely be that after 3 weeks the spineless creep that robbed you had finally worked up enough courage to break in. Check with your local police about burglary reports in your area. They often have lots of useful information.
-- Bobby G.
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On Sat, 7 Apr 2012 06:26:19 -0400, "Robert Green"

I'd think about who knew I was gone that one night vs who knew I was gone the 3 weeks. In the end it probably won't get you anywhere though. It's best to suspect nobody than to suspect everybody. So without proof you finally chalk it up to a random burglar with no connection to you.
--Vic
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On 4/7/2012 9:24 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

Only my g/f knew I would be away that night. Two neighbors knew I was away for three weeks.

That's exactly what I believe, though my friends go along with the "casing the place" notion, and that it was someone I know.
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<snip>
Get a alarm system installed.
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Did they also break your fridge?
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On 4/6/2012 12:15 AM, Ron wrote:

No.
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Rebel1 wrote:

There's a third possibility: The do-bad(s) entered through an unlocked front door and locked the door before they left through the kitchen door. The broken casement window may be an unsuccessful attempt to open it.
Another possibility is that he (she, they, it) is still in your house.
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HeyBub wrote:

The casement window looks like they tried to force it closed from the outside.
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It's a possibility. I'll probably never know for sure, as I doubt the cops will catch anyone. As G. Morgan says, the damage to the casement operator suggests they tried closing the window from outside, but again, why bother?
Regarding the casement window, the operator is normally attached to the window by a rivet. That connection was broken, so the window could be freely positioned simply by hand without using the crank operator.
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Did you happen to notice the dryer vent pipe is broken off behind your clothes dryer? Well, I bet it is. Go check. They crawled in your dryer vent. I'm getting vibrations and I am seeing them crawling in the vent and ripping off the pipe (from the inside of the pipe), where it enters the rear of the dryer. There were two guys, one named Rob, the other Bert. Together they form the Robbert team. Both are unemployed Maytag dryer repairmen, living on unemployment compensation.
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---------- Did you happen to notice the dryer vent pipe is broken off behind your clothes dryer? Well, I bet it is. Go check. They crawled in your dryer vent. I'm getting vibrations and I am seeing them crawling in the vent and ripping off the pipe (from the inside of the pipe), where it enters the rear of the dryer. There were two guys, one named Rob, the other Bert. Together they form the Robbert team. Both are unemployed Maytag dryer repairmen, living on unemployment compensation. ----------
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Bet yours is a late post (April), months after the event -- could it have happened in late December, 24th or so?
David
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