Hole Saw--Removing the Saw from the Bit?

I have a hole saw, 2" in diameter that is fastened to a drill bit with a nut that secures the bit to the cylndrical cutter. How does one get it apart? The cutter looks like a small tin can with one end missing. That end has the teeth. The top has a hole for the bit, and two small holes to either side. I have a suspicion that the two small holes are for a tool to help unloosen the nut holding the bit.
In the past, I'm sure I used a wrench on the nut and held the cutting tool with a pliers. Not so easy this time.
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Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
(121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
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I don't completely understand this. Some arbors have a set screw that holes the center drill bit in place. Is that what you want to get out? Or do you want to get the saw portion off? Some brands have "disk" on top that must be pulled up and then the saw is unscrewed from the arbor.
See the two small holes? Is there a piece in them holding it in place? They must be retracted to unscrew the saw.
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W. Watson wrote:

The hole saw (the can part) is threaded onto the arbor (the part with the spiral bit and nut). It must be unscrewed. I usually put a screw driver thru the side slots and use a wrench on the nut. You could also put the hole saw in a vice and use a wrench. If you put on some good leather gloves and hold the hole saw, put a wrench on the nut and tap it with a hammer, it usually comes loose.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Robert Allison wrote:

described it. There are no slide slits, unfortunately. I'm not real comfortable about putting the can part in the vise in that it might warp the can, although it seems pretty sturdy. Well, maybe a little oil into the nut and thread. The two parts are nicely stuck--so far. Back to the bench.
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Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
(121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
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OK, now I see the problem. They are good for maybe one hole. If you intend to use it for more than that, buy a better brand.
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Solved the problem. I put liquid wrench on the nut, grabbed the saw with a rag, put a wrench on the nut and twisted. Still couldn't get it off, so I took it to the hardware store, and asked the guy who sold it to me. He did the same thing but got out a hammer and whacked the wrench a few times. Off it came. I've now oiled the arbor threads.
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Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
(121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
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W. Watson wrote:

I will quote from my previous response:
If you put on some good leather gloves and hold the hole saw, put a wrench on the nut and tap it with a hammer, it usually comes loose.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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replying to W. Watson, S. Keller wrote: best bet is to get an arbor with a quick release collar, it has two posts that are spring loaded and fit into the hole saw bit and keep it from over tightening on the arbor threads.
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On Friday, August 5, 2016 at 12:44:05 PM UTC-4, S. Keller wrote:

A better bet is to not wait 11 years to offer a suggestion.
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Uncle Monster posted for all of us...

No gerbils?
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Tekkie

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burfordTjustice posted for all of us...

No I am not. However you seem to frequent the he/she part of the equation s o I don't know where you reside and don't really care.
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Funny you should ask; I used my new hole saw set today and was wondering about the same holes. (Blu-Mol?)
If you stick two drill shanks in, it will give you something solid to hold onto while you remove the arbor with a wrench. At least that is what I came up with. There is probably some sort of special pin wrench that fits them, but the drills worked.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)10348645/sr=8-3/ref=pd_csp_3/102-3927868-0530567?v=glance&s=hi&nP7846
Take a look at the above and enlarge the picture. I have this setup. Larger diameter saws require the arbor with 2 pins that go into the 2 holes on top for a positive lock. The arbor for the small holes does not have pins and is not interchangeable with arbor for large holes.
You should be able to get it apart, its right hand thread.

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That end has the teeth.

The two holes are for pushing out the piece removed from whatever you were cutting.

Easy or not, mine works just this way.
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put the the hex partof the arbor in a bench vise & use a pipe wrench on the hole saw; you might have to give the wrench a smack.
Arbors that connect to the hole only with a screw thread tend to get stuck. The better arbors had a sliding element with two egagement pins that do the driving. They usually engage before the thread is completely tight.
A drop of oil on the threads prior to assembly will help prevent lockup.
cheers Bob
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Sorry, Ed, the holes are for the drive lugs. They are not anywhere near long enough to knock out slugs, though I suppose the correct punch could be used to do so after the hole saw is removed from the mandrel. Failure to use the drive lugs will cause the hole saw to jamb onto the mandrel tenaciously.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
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I stand corrected then. That's what I've always used the holes for. I guess I never had a hole saw that came with drive lugs because I've never seen them, I usually buy the cheap stuff when I think a tool may be used just once or twice.
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