Help me buy a circular saw

Page 2 of 3  

Sacramento Dave wrote:

I've never used a circular saw - possibly because, as a nurse, I took care of people who had :o) This is a really interesting thread because I am considering buying a table saw for small wood projects. Does Skil make a comparable table saw? I am not contemplating cutting 2x4's, and the main concerns would be (I expect) accuracy and control, safety and noise. Have to keep it in the condo, as there is no garage. Can arrange a disguise to keep it in the living room :o) My home has almost always had at least one project going on, so a little sawdust is not a major concern.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
46erjoe wrote:

I'm w/ Tony...what in the world have you bought previously and how much do you use it and for what?
Have several, all of which are by now at least 10 years old, the one I use most often as it is the handiest for the occasional use is Dad's old B&D that is now 50+ and never had anything other than a cord replacement. Others include my first which is an unknown manufacturer sold by JC Penney (wife worked there so got employee discount plus on sale meant could afford it as married undergrad) that got in mid-60s and still also works well although somewhat on the "clunky" side. For when get serious, old Skil Mag 77 is the choice altho it's now pushing 25. Granted, don't use them every day, but get pretty heavy use when do use them. Unless in the trades doing framing or similar, can't see wearing most any decent quality one out.
Are you sure it's not a case of dull blade or loss of set in teeth or something similar? Can you move the blade on it's shaft indicating wear?
P-C, Makita, Skil, Milwaukee, others all make stuff that should last a homeowner-type user their lifetime and more...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
black and decker / skil whats the difference?
| | 46erjoe wrote: | > I'm so tired of electric circular saws wearing out! I need to buy one | > that will last. The biggest problem I have had over the years is not | > power, or failed motor, but the inability of the saw to go in a | > straight line. The blade wants to wander on its own, even if I build a | > jig and use a straight board as a guide. I attribute this to worn | > bearings, yes? Am I right in assuming that sealed roller bearings will | > be far superior to brass non-rollers? I'd like to buy a saw and never | > have to buy another for a long long time. Any hints, suggestions? | | I'm w/ Tony...what in the world have you bought previously and how much | do you use it and for what? | | Have several, all of which are by now at least 10 years old, the one I | use most often as it is the handiest for the occasional use is Dad's | old B&D that is now 50+ and never had anything other than a cord | replacement. Others include my first which is an unknown manufacturer | sold by JC Penney (wife worked there so got employee discount plus on | sale meant could afford it as married undergrad) that got in mid-60s | and still also works well although somewhat on the "clunky" side. For | when get serious, old Skil Mag 77 is the choice altho it's now pushing | 25. Granted, don't use them every day, but get pretty heavy use when | do use them. Unless in the trades doing framing or similar, can't see | wearing most any decent quality one out. | | Are you sure it's not a case of dull blade or loss of set in teeth or | something similar? Can you move the blade on it's shaft indicating | wear? | | P-C, Makita, Skil, Milwaukee, others all make stuff that should last a | homeowner-type user their lifetime and more... |
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
kitchens etc. wrote:

Skil is now part of Bosch
B&D independent and holder of P-C, Delta amongst multitude of others...
Skil 77 still, afaict essentially unchanged and I see a lot of them w/ framing crews, far more here than anything else -- but everybody has their preferences and it seems like west coast/mountain/southwest far stronger for the worm-drive lefthand as compared to east coast/south....
For homeowner, many choices will be just fine. OP's problem as I and others noted, is far more likely actually blade than saw itself, whatever it is...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
46erjoe wrote:

Need some more info......
current saw? previous saws? duty cycle? homeowner, handyman, framer?
I've had very good luck with my old Milwaukee worm drive......VERY heavy, so if you're not into heavy saws get a lighter one.
My friends like the Skil 77, one has the Mag version
My experience has been a bad blade on a good saw....cuts wander off straight
A good, sharp blade is the most important thing
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not fo;llowing a line is more an issue with dull blades or cheap ones that go wiggly, upgrade your blade first. Try tenryu, hitachi, skarpaz, freud etc
46erjoe wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

Hmmm, I'd rather have cheap saw with GOOD blade than good saw with cheap blade, LOL! When good blade is on, you already feel the difference. It gives effortless cutting. I spend few more and always buy good blade. Cuts better, lasts longer. And worth reusing after sharpening.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

All saws will eventually wear out, but you can expect a good one to last 10 years and beyond. The larger saws have more power but these can be clumsy to handle. Ergonomics, price, sight lines, adjustments, guards, weight, bevel range, and price must be considered. For about $125 you can get the Milwaukee 6390, perhaps the top-quality 7.25" circular saw. It has an excellent line-of-sight. Porter Cable and Bosch make good circular saws too. If you can try before you buy, all the better. Cutting concrete or metal is abusive and will greatly shorten the life of your saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. I attribute that to dull blades, misalignment of the motor (and hence the blade) with the shoe, and/or operator error.

Porter-Cable or Milwaukee.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Inability to follow a line or straight edge:
Operator error Dull blade Operator error Shoe out of line with blade Operator error Poor quality blade Operator error Overheated dull blade Operator error Maybe, on a really bad day, a worn bearing, but more likely: Operator error
Any name brand, commercial grade saw will deliver more power and accuracy than you or I can manage.
I use Milwaukee / Black&Decker Saw Cat / Porter Cable, right cut / Skil worm drive / Black &Decker worm drive. These saws are all over 10 years old used in a commercial everyday environment. There is a reason for each. None has ever had a problem following or delivering a line with one major exception:
Operator error.
I don't personally like Bosch - just don't, except for the jig saw. The old commercial Black & Decker stuff became DeWalt. All of my battery stuff is DeWalt 18volt and I have a DeWalt Miter saw only because my Black & Decker was stolen. I also have one of the original 9" Rockwell power miters, though we just don't use it anymore. I had evolved to Black & Decker commercial or Milwaukee ONLY (many of these tools are over 30 years old in daily commercial use). Makita made an outstanding drywall gun ( I still have two of the originals). Hilti makes great stuff. Buy once, buy quality, treat accordingly. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ DanG A live Singing Valentine quartet, a sophisticated and elegant way to say I LOVE YOU! snipped-for-privacy@okchorale.org (local) http://www.singingvalentines.com/ (national)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| | Inability to follow a line or straight edge: | | Operator error | Dull blade | Operator error | Shoe out of line with blade | Operator error | Poor quality blade | Operator error | Overheated dull blade | Operator error | Maybe, on a really bad day, a worn bearing, but more likely: | Operator error | | Any name brand, commercial grade saw will deliver more power and | accuracy than you or I can manage. | | I use Milwaukee / Black&Decker Saw Cat / Porter Cable, right cut / | Skil worm drive / Black &Decker worm drive. These saws are all | over 10 years old used in a commercial everyday environment. | There is a reason for each. None has ever had a problem following | or delivering a line with one major exception: | | | Operator error. | | I don't personally like Bosch - just don't, except for the jig | saw. The old commercial Black & Decker stuff became DeWalt. All | of my battery stuff is DeWalt 18volt and I have a DeWalt Miter saw | only because my Black & Decker was stolen. I also have one of the | original 9" Rockwell power miters, though we just don't use it | anymore. I had evolved to Black & Decker commercial or Milwaukee | ONLY (many of these tools are over 30 years old in daily | commercial use). Makita made an outstanding drywall gun ( I still | have two of the originals). Hilti makes great stuff. Buy once, | buy quality, treat accordingly. | ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ | DanG | enough about the crappy tools you own except for the bosch jig saw.
Dewalt tools are a joke I wouldn't buy those damn things for my grandkids to play with to make a bird house. they are most unreliable and made by B&D.............still crap and always was.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You come across as an argumentative twerp. I suspect the tools I am using every day are probably older than you are. Why don't you try to help the people with questions rather than listen to yourself bleat?
Skil, Black & Decker, and Milwaukee have sure built a lot of things in this country. I believe strongly in buying American when and where I can get comparable quality and price. I will even pay a bit more.
It is some of you and yours buying Japanese and other "ese" tools, cars, and electronics that have moved this country into a service only economy. I grew up when American made really meant something. It still does in some areas, I wish it did in all. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ DanG A live Singing Valentine quartet, a sophisticated and elegant way to say I LOVE YOU! snipped-for-privacy@okchorale.org (local) http://www.singingvalentines.com/ (national)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| You come across as an argumentative twerp. I suspect the tools I | am using every day are probably older than you are. Why don't you | try to help the people with questions rather than listen to | yourself bleat? | | Skil, Black & Decker, and Milwaukee have sure built a lot of | things in this country. I believe strongly in buying American | when and where I can get comparable quality and price. I will | even pay a bit more. | | It is some of you and yours buying Japanese and other "ese" tools, | cars, and electronics that have moved this country into a service | only economy. I grew up when American made really meant | something. It still does in some areas, I wish it did in all.
face it nothing that has quality is made in America
plastic- China mechanical parts-Germany Appliances-Sweden/Germany Autos-Japan the list goes on and on
Americans look for the cheapest way to produce a product to make a higher profit while sacraficing quality. why not just call the USA, Mexico (PRETTY SOON THEY WILL BE)
so tell me Mr.DanG what is quality made in the damn UNITED STATES of Mexico today.|
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@spamless.net says...

The other thing to look for is a cast shoe. Stamped shoes tend to go out-of-alignmemt. I like the design of the Porter Cable saws and they come in both right and left hand models.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Consider getting a left blade model if you are right handed. Porter-cable makes a nice one.
It's much easier to see the cut line because the motor is on the opposite side of the saw compared to a "typical" circular saw.
46erjoe wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| Consider getting a left blade model if you are right handed.
that will just throw the saw dust in your face.
| Porter-cable makes a nice one. | | It's much easier to see the cut line because the motor is on the | opposite side of the saw compared to a "typical" circular saw.
like I said: that will just throw the saw dust in your face. it's kinda tough to see the line with the suit of armor you will be wearing to deflect the wood chips flying at you. Isn't the line guide in the front on all saws?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
kitchens etc. wrote:
- - - Consider getting a left blade model if you are right handed. -

- that will just throw the saw dust in your face.
The PC has an adaptor that sends the saw dust in any direction the operator chooses.
- - It's much easier to see the cut line because the motor is on the - - opposite side of the saw compared to a "typical" circular saw.
-Isn't the line guide in the front on all saws?
Look at the pictures of Norm at this site...the ones where he is doing the plunge cut and the gang cut. Notice how he is leaning over the saw to see his cut line. Now, picture the same cuts with the saw motor on the opposite side of the blade. Norm would not be leaning over the saw to see the cut line since his head would be on the same side of the saw as the blade.
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/tools/article/0,16417,463950-5,00.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Makita makes the best and most versatile circular saw you can buy. 25 years later with daily use and it still cuts straight. it is the only saw I would cut with for sawing over my head. they even have lights on the newer models.
only had to replace the cord (caused by lowering it down from the staging)
| I'm so tired of electric circular saws wearing out! I need to buy one | that will last. The biggest problem I have had over the years is not | power, or failed motor, but the inability of the saw to go in a | straight line. The blade wants to wander on its own, even if I build a | jig and use a straight board as a guide. I attribute this to worn | bearings, yes? Am I right in assuming that sealed roller bearings will | be far superior to brass non-rollers? I'd like to buy a saw and never | have to buy another for a long long time. Any hints, suggestions? | Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pretty much *any* 25-year-old saw is better made than most new ones.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 13:59:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrotF:

I've had Skil s before. Lasted til one week after the warrant. My most recent one, the one I have been bitching about, was a Makita. What a POS.
I went out and bought a Milwaukee 6394-21. As soon as I started using it, it was like driving a Lexus after having driven a Neon. I couldn't NOT make it go a straight line!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.