HD Plastic Electric Tie-Wraps

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Hi,
Bought a package of those electrical plastic tie-wraps at HD. The kind they sell, mainly, for wrapping around a cable bundle to hold them together.
But, they are useful for a zillion other purposes, too.
Tried to wrap them around a fence post to hold some reflective markers on.
They fractured immediately.
Guess the plastic they use can't take to cold. But it should; only about 20 deg F out there, which really isn't all that bad.
Anyone else ever experience this ?
Bob
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I don't know about that problem, but if you are going to use them outside, get the black ones that are rated to be UV resistant. The white ones will not last very long in the sun. They may be other colors than black that are UV resistant,but I don't know right off hand.
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Yes - the Harbor Freight ties are similar. The trick is to find nylon ties and not plastic ones, but that's not always easy.
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On 12/21/2010 12:13 PM, Robert Neville wrote:

Ahem, nylon is plastic ;)
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Point taken. Should have said UV resistent nylon over other generic alternatives...
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Lordy! ...are they still with us? Haven't thought of them since I perused their wish-books for Knight ham gear, as a kid.
nb
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wrote:

That wasn't Allied Electronics, it was 'ALLIED RADIO', which was bought out by Tandy (Radio Shack) about 1954. I really liked Allied Radio in Chicago - they had a good catalog. What was your ham tag? I was W5??, but I was never very active, too busy making a living and raising a family back in the 1950's.
Bob-tx
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On 12/21/2010 10:54 AM Bob-tx spake thus:

Yep. I grew up reading the Allied catalog from cover to cover and hanging out in the local store (Evanston, Ill.). And that line was called "Knight-Kit", which I guess was their response to Heathkit; you could buy them either in kit form or assembled.
I seem to remember that for a short time after being swallowed up by Tandy that they were called "Allied Radio Shack", though I can't be sure. Even in those days Radio Shack was clearly third-rate, much more limited than Allied (or Lafayette, or any of the other electronics lines available).
I'm sitting next to an Allied receiver that runs my computer sound. Still working after being bought--*used*--in 1975. (I had to replace one transistor in the preamp section about 15 years ago.)
--
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wrote:

All that talk brings back memories. I had all the catalogs, despite the fact that I lived in Canada and most US companies wanted nothing to do with Canadian customers. If my parents had some money, I probably would have been an electrical engineer, but I also had problems with math. Ended up in printing, designing and creating business forms, which really sharpened my math skills, as forms for early computer printers had to work with odd-ball font and line spacing, while still creating all the preprinted information on the forms. It was a living.
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On 12/21/2010 4:08 PM, EXT wrote:

Oh yea! You did it old school. I worked with a guy who owned a company that produced ink for offset printers. He had developed a waterless ink for offset printers and I designed and built a cooling and humidification unit for his process because the ink needed to stay cool in order to perform and it also needed a touch of humidity. We took it an industry show and some printing companies and even discussed it with some guys from AB Dick. My friend dropped dead of a heart attack while watching a football one afternoon. The project died along with him.
TDD
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On 12/21/2010 2:47 PM The Daring Dufas spake thus:

What do you mean, "waterless ink"? All offset ink is waterless. (Offset lithography works on the principle that oil & water don't mix: the ink is oil-based, while the non-image parts of the printing plate are wetted with water, repelling the ink.)
I think maybe you mean ink for waterless offset? (Have to pardon me; I used to be an offset printer, so I know a thing or three about the process.)
Too bad about your friend, though.
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On 12/21/2010 5:08 PM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

The offset presses I'm familiar with have a water trough for wetting the the printing plate. The ink I'm referring to was run on the press with no water to wet the plate. That was a big deal from what I understand of offset presses because the printer "not the machine but the guy in the funny hat" didn't have to fiddle with the water adjustments. I'm no expert on offset printing even though I've repaired a lot of controls for presses and collating equipment. I built an auxiliary vacuum source for one guy's collating machine and put a big label on it that read "SUCK-MASTER 2000". I hope my explanation clears things up. :-)
TDD
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On 12/21/2010 4:08 PM The Daring Dufas spake thus:

That's the water fountain, that delivers water to the dampener ("form") rollers that wet the plate (ackshooly, not just water, but mostly water plus other stuff in what's called "fountain solution").

OK. That's waterless offset. I actually don't know how it works (magic?); the plate somehow repels ink from the non-image areas without water. (Water in offset printing is kind of a pain in the ass, leading to scumming, press sheets that don't lie flat and other problems.)
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On 12/21/2010 7:11 PM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

That's it, the guys who ran the presses had to screw around with the water and said it was a real pain. The cooling unit I built cooled the area around the plate and an ultrasonic humidifier added an adjustable level of moisture to the air stream. It's been sitting in storage ever since my friend died which was some years ago. I suppose I could re-purpose it for something like keeping flowers fresh. :-)
TDD
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On 2010-12-21, Bob-tx <No> wrote:

I never did the ham thing. My buddy did, but I turned left at rock and roll and guitars and amps and joined a band. Guess who is starting all over again, joined ARRL, and even learning morse code. Yer never too old. ;)
nb
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They were probably old ones, then. They degrade and get brittle when they get old.
I second the use of the black-colored ties.
--
Tegger

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On 12/21/2010 2:30 PM, Tegger wrote:

Good ones don't.

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On 12/21/2010 2:30 PM, Tegger wrote:

At first black ones were UV resistant, and they were labeled that way. Don't judge them by color, many black ones made now are not UV-resistant. Read the label to find UV-resistant ones.
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On 12/21/2010 10:50 AM, Bob wrote:

Yes, big box cable ties are junk. If you want good quality ties go to a real supply house and buy say ty-rap brand:
http://www.tnb.com/ps/pubint/index.cgi?a=get_sub&cid=2
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Yes-
Check country of origin.
My buddy gets his at HD or HF and they are typically from China. The material looks crappy; chalky & rough
I get mine from McMaster in various colors & they come in bags labeled Made in USA. For ~3 to $7 per hundred depending on size, I figure the Made in USA are worth it, they've never fractured or cracked.
cheers Bob
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