Generator Useage

Page 1 of 2  
I am going to buy a generator this year (I'm in FL). I have a chart showing how many watts most appliances use but what I need is a chart showing how many amps each appliance uses. Does anyone know of a chart online that I could print out? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Watts equals volts X amps. If you know the wattage, divide that number by the voltage, (usually 120 for plug in appliances, and 240 for built in cooktops, ranges, etc) and you will get your amperage
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

large generators are gasoline piggies.
have you considered a propane or natural gas generator??
todays gasoline spoils fast, even with stabilizer.
you dont need enough power to run your home normally, just run things sequentially. small window AC kept just for emergencies, fridge, freezer etc run one at a time.
leave enough capacity to help neighbors so they cant complain of the noise
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Be sure to look into a transfer switch. They are used to prevent current from entering the grid. This is very important to the safety of the power company folks. If you plan to use extension cords only, perhaps a transfer switch is not needed. Good luck Clint
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you! This year I will probably use extensions cords then next year will buy a transfer switch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dottie wrote:

Check out the following:
http://www.nooutage.com/generato2.htm
and
http://www.hondapowerequipment.com/Products/Generators/content.aspx?asset=gg_wattage
Dottie, if you're looking for a good, reliable, highly energy-efficient (approx 8 hrs powering realistic loads on 1 gal. gas) , quiet generator that is truly portable (approx. 50 lbs fully-gassed and about the size of a small suitcase) and which produces "clean" power (the "i" stands for "inverter"), I highly recommend the Honda EU2000i. With a little extension cord juggling it can power lots of stuff. However, since you're in FL you'll probably want to power at least a small window A/C and I'm not sure about that.
I just fired up mine a couple of days ago after some nasty storms (Iowa) cut out power. In the winter, I test it under load about once per month and it will RUN simultaneously: a furnace (nat. gas with 1/3 hp blower motor and with a transfer switch installed for that circuit only), refrig-freezer, chest freezer, and radio. I imagine that if any TWO of the furnace, refrig-freezer or freezer STARTED UP at exactly the same time that would likely overload it but that hasn't happened in any test or real use. I've also powered a 1/3 hp sump pump substituted for the chest freezer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Put a lot of thought into what you are about to do.
I am building a house in Virginia to replace mine that I lost to Katrina in Mississippi.
We have installed a 12KW, propane-power backup generator from Generac. It comes with a transfer switch and panel as part of the generator. The generator is 4 ft X 8 ft X 3 ft tall and comes complete with a fiberglass base that plants directly on the ground. There's a BIG cable running from the generator to a pre-wired breaker panel.
You'll need an electrician to wire it -- he/she will talk with you about which circuits you want to have power when the electrical mains fail, then, he'll wire those circuits into the generator's panel box -- which mounts inside your house. The generator is then programmed to exercise itself once a week -- ours is set for 2:00 PM Friday -- at that time the generator kicks on, the tranfer switch kicks in, and the house runs off generator power for 15 minutes after which the generator shuts off and we go back on the mains.
If the generator is the only thing in your house that uses propane, you can get by with a small tank. Or, if you have natural gas available, you can set up the generator to run on that.
ON THE OTHER HAND -- you can buy a "portable" gasoline-power generator and a big bunch of extension cords. Then, when the power fails, you drag out the generator, crank it up -- hoping that you remembered to keep a stock of gasoline -- and run extension cords all over the place.
The automatic, propane or NG powered generator with transfer switch and panel is the way to go -- mine cost $2,500 and the electrician charged $700 to install it -- I trailered it in from the Lowe's where I bought it and four of us cussed it off the trailer onto the ground.
http://www.generac.com/Products/Residential/AirCooled/14KW.aspx
It's quiet, too. Mine sits inside a back corner of the house and I cannot hear it running while I'm standing in the front yard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you dont know how to figure amps, I will bet you need to do alot of research to purchase and safely run one, you dont just buy one and plug things in, as alot goes wrong and you have to know how to monitor it and know its right. You are aware of course that a 400 watt motor can need initialy 1000+ watts off the gen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It really comes down to handful of questions:
1) Do you want to live essentially a "normal" life while the utility power is out? If so, you get something that will run your airconditioner and your water heater at the same time plus about 4 kW more. When you are on generator power, use some common sense and don't take showers and use the electric stove at the same time unless you turn off the central air conditioning.
2) If you can live without central air for the duration, but don't want to get carried away with energy management you might want 8 to 10 kW. This will run your water heater and part of your stove at the same time. Again, don't be foolish and try to run everything at the same time.
3) Otherwise, you should get a 5 kW unit. That's enough for a window A/C and "some" use of the electric stove, water heater, microwave. That's the arrangement we have. We also have a deep well water pump. When the power goes out for a time (like a few days), I get by with running it a few hours in the morning and another few others in the evening. We can take quick showers, cook meals, watch TV in an window A/C cooled family room, and even run the dishwasher. We can't do laundry and we actually turn off loads like the water pump, the water heater, etc. except when we have cut other loads to the bone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 27 May 2008 22:58:28 -0400, "John Gilmer"

The thing a lot of people ignore is "feeding the monster" as folks called it after Charlie here. These things, even small ones, use an extraordinary amount of fuel. A 120 gallon propane tank is not going to last very long, maybe a week if you take it easy but you can burn 120 gallons in 3 or 4 days if you are running your house like normal. If you are carrying cans from the gas station plan on going every day or two with a truck load. You will also start to appreciate how cheap electricity is from the utility when you fill up those tanks and cans,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 29, 6:40pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

They are monsters, and the auto cycling of those auto gens can cost $10-20 month for their "self tests" Nothin is free. Buy gen and its a new kid to feed, at least installing a transfer panel gives options.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

please cite that monthly cost,,,, want link.
i doubt is anywhere near that, they run basiclly unloaded for 5 minutes 4 times a month..
how do you get 10 to 20 bucks a month from that?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If they are properly installed they will run until the coolant temperature reaches a preset value. With most of the generators I've installed that's about fifteen minutes. Then they transfer the load back to public power, then ten more minutes for no load cool down prior to automatic stop.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well the new generator is in the garage. I finished reading the instruction manual and all it said about extension cords was "don't use old frayed cords". One of my neighbors said he plans to use 14 gauge. I went to Lowe's yesterday and looked ... the lawn and garden equipment we have uses 16 gauge. The generator will be sitting outside the garage and the cord that came with it will slip under the garage door - so the extension cords will all be inside. It seems to me that 16 gauge would be sufficient to run things like refrigerators, TVs, microwave and lights. We do not have room air conditioners. I hesitate to invest a lot into extension cords now because I am seriously thinking about buying one of those kits next year and connecting it to that. What do those of you who connect by extension cords use with yours? Thanks. (I bought two two-gallon jugs of gasoline today and put about one half tank in my car and I'm still reeling from the sticker shock. )
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dottie wrote:

Dottie -
Get yourselves some good extension cords! And buy only the length you absolutely need since the added resistance of a long cord (or multiple connected cords) reduces the electrical power (Watts) or current (Amps) it can safely carry. (Remember: Voltage x Amps = Watts)
Remember, the higher the gauge number the less electrical power or current it can safely carry. In other words, 16 gauge is made for fewer watts (or amps) than 14 gauge which is made for fewer watts (or amps) than 12 gauge, etc.
Here's a handy table of cord gauge recommended for given Amps (Watts/Voltage) and length:
http://nevadawalrus.com/index-wired.html
Personally, with my small generator (Honda EU2000i which has two 120 volt outlets with surge watts: 2000 watts; running watts: 1800 watts; therefore, approximately 15 amps), I use 12 gauge extension cords and keep max total length <= 100 ft.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Erma1ina wrote:

Ooops! Just noticed I made a mistake -- my EU2000i has running/rated watts: 1600 (NOT 1800).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You reposted about twenty lines of chicken scratches to make a correction like that? What a waste of bandwidth.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

If so, I'm SO SORRY. I'll be sure to refund your admission fee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dottie wrote:

After getting some good extension cords (I use and would recommend 12 gauge), you might consider getting cheap battery-operated thermometers with remote sensors that go inside the refrig/freezers and transmit (wired or wirelessly) to a receiver outside.
That way you'll know when you really need to have the appliance(s) plugged in. Since they are well-insulated, refrig/freezers can go many hours without running once the temp is brought down. So, you can either save gas by not running the generator or plug in something else that you need.
I use a couple of the following wired remote sensor thermometers:
http://indoorhealthproducts.com/805e.htm
They were worth the 12 bucks each, shipping included. After putting them in my refrig/freezer before an ice storm that was predicted last winter, I've just left them in for the spring thunderstorm/tornado season. To save battery life, I only turn them on when I want to read the temp.
By the way, about the gasoline: Be sure to use something like STABIL and keep the supply in the gas cans fresh. At the end of each month, I put the gas remaining in the can(s) into the car and refill the cans with fresh gas-plus-STABIL. Some folks store their generators dry; I keep mine fully gassed and run it several hours under load each month to keep it "in shape and ready to go" with (pretty) fresh gas-plus-STABIL.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you for your help. The man who sold us the generator said he puts just enough gas gas into his to test it once a month ... then he removes the left over. He said that doing that kept it from gumming up the works. Several people have said they have siphons and I have been meaning to ask where to buy them. There is an auto parts store not too far from me so I can start there I guess. The generator I bought has 5000 running watts. I have to measure and see how long I need - don't want to use more than necessary. Do you have a carbon monoxide monitor? I will be sure to run the generator outside but don't know how far the fumes move ....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.