Finally an alternative to incandescents?

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Moving air helps perspiration to evaporate. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I do not believe ceiling fans actually do anything except make people think they're more comfortable when they're not. It's psychological. So as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine. When you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.
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ting.

nk they're more comfortable when they're not.  It's psychological.  So as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine.  When yo u're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.
Which is obviously wrong. Is it just psychological that it feels cooler when a breeze is blowing? Of course not. Moving air increases evaporation from the body and takes more heat away, it's an actual physical process.
And as someone else pointed out, using a motion sensor on them isn't going to allow them to be used in a bedroom, when someone is sleeping. If it's an optional one that can be used or not used depending on the application, then it's a good idea. If it's another ram it down or throats mandate from govt, then it's a bad idea.
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wrote:

ld

osting.

hink they're more comfortable when they're not.  It's psychological.  S o as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine.  When you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.

Ny best friends family runs many fans 24/7 in the summer even when no one is home to keep the house cool. No mtter how much he tries to explain it his family insists that a vacant home with fans running is cooler than no fans........
All the fans do is add more heat:(
I suggested he just get AC since it might be cheaper to operate...
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ould

posting.

think they're more comfortable when they're not.  It's psychological.  So as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine.  W hen you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.

It isn't what the thermometer says, it is what it "feels" like. A bit too warm in the house? I turn on the furnace fan and am comfortable again. Eventually, it gets warm enough that I have to use the AC of course but that usually comes hours after I started that fractional horse fan. Yes, I know, you will deny that that works and refuse to even try it out. I have been there before with yu doubting thomases.
Harry K
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would

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le think they're more comfortable when they're not.  It's psychological.  So as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine.  W hen you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.

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Count me as one of the doubters. With a ceiling fan you get a cooling breeze, which is a direct effect. It's blowing right on you. With a typical furnace fan running you don't get a breeze, in fact that would be undesirable. I guess if you had one area of the house that happened to be significantly colder, then it might get you somewhere, but that isn't the typical case......
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wrote:

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ople think they're more comfortable when they're not.  It's psychological .  So as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine.  When you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.

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As I said, doubters won't try it.
Yesterday with outside temp at 87 it got uncomfortable. Flipped on the fan almost instant comfort. Of course you can explain that by the ductwork running in basement and crawl space thus containing a fair amount of cool air at the beginning. Does not explain why it was still comfortable a couple hours latere.
Harry K
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On Friday, May 10, 2013 2:42:12 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I think it might even work in reverse.
If there's no air movement, you may get some stratification or at least a gradient with the hot air up near the ceiling and the cool air down at the bottom where you're sitting or lying.
Mix that up with the house fan, and it should end up all the same temperature. It would be the average temperature, very likely considerably warmer than the temperature that formerly was at the lower levels where you are.
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wrote:

they're more comfortable when they're not. It's psychological. So as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine. When you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.
Nonsense. Moving air cools people off.
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wrote:

they're more comfortable when they're not. It's psychological. So as long as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine. When you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.
Do you use ceiling fans? They work, but IME you have to feel the air on your skin. I've had a couple that were pretty useless because they didn't push enough air. A good ceiling fan is often the difference between comfortable and sweat running down your nose. When you have good ones where needed you can knock about 5 degrees off your HVAC setting. Big savings.
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5 degrees sounds like a lot and I'll guess that humidity will make a difference in the A/C setting too. Anyone else have an estimate?
I'd like to get some idea of fans vs. A/C settings to see if I might save energy this summer by installing a fan rather than using the A/C so much.
Tomsic
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That's 5 degrees is just a guesstimate from me, and it's always somewhat subjective. We have ceiling fans in most the rooms where you sit or lay. Keep the AC set on 80. Sometimes we drop it to 78 when humidity is high. I'm guessing I would need 75 to get the same comfort level with no ceiling fans.

I use a 12" oscillating desk fan by my basement work area, so you don't need a ceiling fan to test comfort level with moving air. Main thing with ceiling fans is blade size and design, and motor noise. I've got cheap paddle blade ones that move air well enough, but are hummers. My sister has some nice dead quiet ones in her Florida condo, with smaller blades that move more air than mine. Shaped metal blades. Probably a big cost difference.
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In today's US society, it's a small price to pay to reduce the chances of law suits. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
No, it's not a huge amount of energy. But if there's no point to lighting something, why do it?
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Sometimes it costs more to turn things on and off frequently. Burns out stuff. Expensive repair.
Greg
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I heard that from the building electricians. And that restroom everyone insisted on turning off at work, that lamp needed changing often.
Greg
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wrote:

Turning a fluorescent lamp on and off frequently typically reduces the life of the lamp. But, there are certain ballasts that can minimize the effect. Fluorescent lamp life is usually determined using a 3 hours/start cycle.
There is little effect on the life of incandescent and LED lamps due to on/off switching; but incandescent lamps can fool you since they often burn out when switched on. However, tests done years ago operating incandescent lamps on a flashing circuit vs. continuous burning while recording the actual "on" times for each showed no significant difference in life.
Tomsic
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Ballasts were going bad too. Cfl's suffer a bit from on off cycling. Many of mine are always on.
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

A couple run about 14hrs/day, so those should go in just under six years.
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wrote:

A couple. Those are candidates for CFLs, possibly. All? Good grief!
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On Fri, 26 Apr 2013 20:15:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I have a kitchen under counter fixture that has been on for the 32 years we've lived here. Actually, I'm on the third, maybe fourth fixture. It is a Lights of America fluorescent that is cheaper to replace than just buying a new bulb.
There are 8760 hours in a year and these things last a few years. There may be an LED in the future for that location.
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What a horrible waste of electricity. You should be taken out and flogged by a Greenie.

Perhaps. A switch would be more effective, though.
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